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Leica M Monochrom Henri Digital Rangefinder Camera - Page 22
 
Khalid Al-Thani & Thorsten Overgaard leica m monochrom sample photo
   
 
   

Leica M Monochrom Digital Rangefinder Camera - Page 22

Index of Thorsten von Overgaard's user review pages covering Leica M9, Leica M9-P, M-E, Leica M10,
Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom, M 246  as well as Leica Q and Leica SL:

Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M9-P   Links
Leica M10
V 1                                      
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44         What if?
Leica M-D 262 1 2                        
Leica Monochrom 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
A
29
B
29
C
29
D
               
Leica Q 1                            
Leica SL 1 2 3 4 5                               Books

 

Writing light letters by the moonlight

By: Thorsten Overgaard

I woke up in the middle of the night some months ago and yelled, "I don't want to be a landscape photographer!" and then fell back asleep.

A nightmare, clearly.

I don't have any rules for what I don't want to photograph, nor have I warned my kids against becoming landscape photographers, and I probably have done a few pictures that would qualify as landscapes. But what people mostly point out to me is that there are people in most of my images, and rightly so.

But maybe it was some irony of life that I recently found my self spending nine days shooting landscapes in Qatar. Whilst I did not find myself very succesful in making any landscape pictures I found interesting, I worked with Khalid Al-Thani whom I may tell more about later. He is rather discrete about his photography, and I would like to change that to a more public profile as he has a very intersting eye for landscape, light and patterns.

 

White Horse by Thorsten Overgaard wtih Leica M Monochrom leica m monochrom sample photo
The White Horse in Doha, Qatar, January 2013. Photographed in the last minutes of the sunset light, Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. Adjusted in Lightroom 3. 320 ISO, 1/4.000, f/0.95. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Working with someone else is always interesting because you get to understand what they see, and mainly to see what they saw when you didn't think there was anything to see. I've given the example many times, that if you take four photographers with the same camera and the same lens and have them photograph the same scene at the same time, you will get four very different views. So in my opinion - and experience - walking and working with other photographers is very interesting and can nothing but expand your own view and/or clarify for yourself how your own photography represents a unique viewpoint from others.

 

Khalid Al-Thani working with the Leica Visioflex
Khalid Al-Thani working with the Leica Visoflex 65mm Macro Elmar f/3.5 to get some details of the wings (the lens goes from macro to infinity). Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. Adjusted in Lightroom 3. 320 ISO, 1/4.000, f/0.95 with B+W 3-stop ND-filter. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

We all expect that what we can photograph, anybody else can photograph too. Not so. Far from the truth. Your viewpoint is very unique, and if you knew just how unique, you would appreciate your own photographs much more and envy others' less.

 

The bird man. Leica M Monochrom
The bird man. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 with B+W 3-stop ND filter. 320 ISO, 1/2000 second. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard

 

         
 

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Night photography (and other adventures)
with the Leica M Monochrom, Leica M9 and Leica MP in Qatar

The adventure we set forth to do was mainly shooting landscapes by moon light. Some times with birds, camels or horses.

Our day would usually start with preparations after lunch, and in the afternoon we would drive out to a location in the desert, arriving in time to shoot in the sunset light. And usually an hour later - around 7 PM - the moon would be in position to shoot scenery with the moon as the only light source.

 

Shadows by moonlight. Leica M Monochrom
Shadows by moonlight. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 800 ISO, 1 second. Tripod. Finished in Lightroom 3. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 
 

 

 

 

I of course cheated a little by implementing people in my photographs, and by doing so I might have proven my own opinion about each photographer making each scenery fit his own viewpoint. Khalid would see patterns and light and follow his photographic goal of communicating the atmosphere of the Qatar desert. I would find people, light or other living things to communicate.

 

Brothers of the desert. by Thorsten Overgaard
Brothers of the desert. Whilst we were setting up a rather complicated scenery with camels at sunset, a father and five of his sons (living in the desert) came by in their Land Rover. For me a chance to do portraits and candid photos of the sons. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 320 ISO, 1/1000 sec, f/0.95 with B+W 3-stop ND-filter. Finished in Lightroom 3. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

But the conditions was not set by me. I was placed in a (for me) foreign landscape with challenging light conditions both at day and even more so at night. To play with composition and light where there were no light and not many elements to compose.

In other words, it was a challenge and a learning experience for both of us; working side by side with expressed and unexpressed preferences.

 

Khalid Al-Thani photographing a landscape with tripod by moonlight
Khalid Al-Thani photographing a landscape with tripod by moonlight. We worked with double exposures and both Leica M9, Leica M Monochrom and Leica MP loaded with 400 ISO film. I did several of these similar looking, but decided for this one with some headlights from a car some miles away making the image more alive. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 400 ISO, 4 seconds, tripod. Finished in Lightroom 3. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

High ISO experience

One of the freedoms of the Leica M Monochrom that you soon start to appreciate is the ability to turn the ISO up to 3200 and 6400, and even 10000 if you must. With a lightstrong lens as the Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 or a Summilux f/1.4 there is hardly anything you can't photograph.

If you look at the images on this page you will see that very few are really high ISO. Because when you shoot in almost complete darkness, your chances of getting a good picture handheld at very high ISO are not that good.

I did a few handheld pictures but soon turned to tripod. One thing was that we were trying to emulate 400 ISO of the film cameras on most cameras, and for some images, we wanted motion blur and/or multiple exposure.

But the next concern was the quality of details.

 

Khalid Al-Thani photographing by moonlight
Khalid Al-Thani photographing by moonlight with the Leica M9 Hermes and the silver Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95, 10,000 ISO, 1/8 second. Edited in Lightroom 3.

 

Capturing details and aesthetics in low light

The point of it all was not so much having low light, but to have a different type of light. I will later be finishing an interview with lens designer Peter Karbe about the Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH that he was the lead designer of (as he was on the Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4, the 35mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4 FLE (FLoating Element) and the 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95).

One of the things he told me a couple of weeks before was ringing in the back of my head as I stood in the dark and cold desert, freezing by the camera on the tripod.

 

Camel by tree in moonlight. Leica M Monochrom
Camel by tree in moonlight. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 1600 ISO, 1/8 second. Finsihed in Lightroom 3. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

On a final note about how to perfect the lens design further, he said, "it's easy to take photos when there is light. It's another thing to take photos when there is no light."

He wasn't referring to my upcoming desert experience but to the fact that Leica lenses such as the current 35mm and 50mm Summilux and the 50mm Noctilux, as well as the new 50mm APO-Summicron seem to see more shadow details than the human eye.

 

Photographing birds by moon light. Leica M Monochrom
Photographing birds by moon light. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 1600 ISO, 1/4 second. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Now, he see lens design and the light in a few more dimensions than just what is captured. He has some ideas about how the quality of it should be, both what is in focus and what is out of focus. All very interesting, and in the coming months or years I will try to translate his vision into pictures and articles. More on that, later.

But how should a landscape, patterns, surfaces and all look in an image, when what the human eye can see is quite limited? That was one of the things I spent some thoughts about both in the desert where the preview would light up on the cameras display as strong as a cars headlights. And then again when I had the images on the computer.

 

The camp at nigth. Leica M Monochrom
The camp at night. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH F/0.95. ISO 400, 3 seconds. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

You can correct the exposure and all a great deal, but how should an image taken in darkness look? At some point it looks like daylight or sunset when it was in reality pitch black. On the other hand, a pitch black photo wouldn't communicate anything. So where is the balance between pitch black and a level where you can see the details, the surfaces and it contain some form of aesthetics?

 

         
 

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A new way of painting with light

The word photography comes from "painting (or writing) with light" and is of course in many ways in family with the work that painters used to do before we became able to record light with chemistry on glass plates (and later on plastic and now recorded digitally).


Berlin, October, 2012. Leica M Monochrom at 3200 ISO with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0, 1/350 sec

 

I remember my surprise when I did some photos in Berlin back in October 2012 in a restaurant in Berlin. I shot at 3200 ISO at 1/350 of a second.

Where high ISO images often can look like daylight with a plastic and unnatural look to them (because it's not daylight but low light boosted to an unnatural level), these Leica M Monochrom pictures looked different.

In a way closer to reality, but at the same time with something added that is partly the actual low light (a candle light), partly the way the sensor and lens work.

 


Berlin, October, 2012. Leica M Monochrom at 3200 ISO with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0

 

This was done with the old designed Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0, and one of the qualities of the new Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 is that it captures details in the darkness better.

In daylight the old and the new Noctilux have much in common, only the new is a bit more contrasty and a bit sharper.

But in darkness the difference should be even more visible.

 

The White Horse by moonlight, Qatar. Leica M Monochrom
The White Horse by moonlight, Qatar. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 6400 ISO, 1/12 second. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Defining a unique style

A lot in photography has to do with finding out what ones own style is, and either as part as that, or as the next step, to move it to an even more individual style. Like a painter back in the day would start by learning the technique, then see what the great masters did, and then eventually develop his own technical skills and style, along perhaps with a different way of showing things (as for example Picasso did).

In photography we can distinguish our style by the choice of sensor (or film type, brand and developing technique), by the choice of presentaion and print (as in paper types and/or developing skills and techniques in a darkroom), and by finding lenses that few others use.

 


One way of making it special and unique. This painful slow video (yet interesting) show Platinum Palladium Printing with Leica M M

 

Photogravure

Also read the article by Max Marinucci about photogravure (a modern variant of the classic copper-plate photogravure process) of images from the Leica M Monochrom. He did a spendid article on Steve Huff called "The Future Is In The Past – The Leica Monochrom and Photogravure" about it. Further info on his website, maxmarinucci.com

 

There's plenty of ways to develop a distinct style, either by accident or by exploring. But you get the picture.

And the Leica M Monochrom opens up for some obvious possibilities because it behave differently, and because it is a new and unexplored camera type.

What is interesting here is not the cameras ability to go high in ISO, but how the sensor and lens together paint the light when there is no light.

 

Khalid Al-Thani
Khalid Al-Thani in one of his tiredless attempts to find and capture patterns and light for which he has a very good eye. Leica M9 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The third element of course is how you light the scenery. Moonlight, candlelight, headlights of a car, winter darkness ...

But it is evident that where quality light is usually defined by the size of the light source (and not the strength), shooting with no light is not actually no light if the exposure is long enough; but a type of light with qualities you cannot necessarily judge by the eye.

 

Khalid Al-Thani working with the Leica Visioflex
Khalid Al-Thani working with the Leica Visoflex 65mm Macro Elmar f/3.5 to get some details of the horse (the lens goes from macro to infinity). © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 with B+W 3-stop ND-filter. 320 ISO, 1/750 second. Finished in Lightroom 3.

 

Editing in Lightroom 3 or Lightroom 4

I have never found Lightroom 4 amazing, which is why I still use Lightroom 3 (as of March 2013). My basic viewpoint is that I find the tones in LR4 unreal, and I suspect that the extreme controls of tones added in LR4 is what makes it look fake. It looks like a digital rendering (which it is; but a bad one).

One can use LR4 in classic mode, meaning one can still edit as if it was LR3 controls, or (as I have done so far) continue to use LR 3.6. I keep an install of LR 3.6 on my harddrive for students in my workshops, and you can download it here. It works as any other Lightroom installation with a 30 day trial, and then you have to insert the serial number you got with your Leica camera (and I shouldn't mention that if you change your computer's date forward a couple of years when installing and opening for the first time, then change it back to present time, you will add a couple of years to the trial period. But I do some times mention that little wellknown fact to people who want to try it for longer. But do buy and pay for software if you use it frequently and/or when you feel able to pay for it).

The reason it doesn't matter much if you use LR3 or LR4 is that the actual 'engine' to convert your RAW files is the Camera Raw in any case, and that is the same. It is a separate download and update on your computer (that happens automatically with the Software Update on your Mac).

 

Camels by moonlight. Leica M Monochrom
Camels by moonlight. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 3200 ISO, 1/2 second. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 
  Lightroom 3 sliders in the Basic Editing Tool goes from 0-100 where the sliders in LR4 goes from -100 to +100
   

Process Version 2010 vs. Process Version 2012
When importing images into Lightroom 4, you use PV 2012 (Process Version 2012), whereas Lightroom 3 uses PV 2010. You can select when importing which version you wish to use, hence which Basic Editing Tools you get. The Lightroom 4 offers extreme tonal editing, LR 3 a more 'natural' tonal editing - in my opinion. This is based on Leica M9 and Leica M Monochrom and the way I work.

However, the reason given by Adobe to upgrade is that new camera-sensors of today offer more data to work with, hence the sliders should offer more (extreme) possibilities to use that extra space. But also they wanted to make the sliders more logical, as well as adjustments in JPG and RAW files compatible.

What does matter is how the software uses the Camera Raw, and LR 4 simply allows you to go more extreme on adjusting the image. And in my opinion, too extreme and/or in a not very classic aesthetic way. This might change with future sensors, such as the Leica M Type 240 or others, so don't get locked in LR 3 forever.

 


Setting up camp. Leica M9 with Leica 50mm Summicron-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The blind leading the blind
Look at the picture and find your own style of editing and tones you are satisfied with. The more I read about Adobe Lightroom and the update, the more I am convinced that they tend to look at how to adjust histograms (even tones all over the field by lessening highlights and softening up shadows), rather than actually making skin tones look like skin tones, or a Greek pillar look like a Greek pillar.

And LR 3 is still faster than LR 4.

Speaking of LR4, I should repeat my warning about LR4 - and most software for that matter - that when you update LR3 to LR4, the software will suggest you update all your image files "as it might improve" them. It might improve noise and other things, but it also changes the exposure and all other adjustments. Hence, if you just update all your files, the edits you did so far will not look as you edited them. Bad idea, really. I want to kick someone when I see software companies suggest so ruthlessly to follow their ideas. Adobe does state in blogs and elsewhere that one should apply updates individually, but they also built in a dialog box where you with one click can update all your files.

And that goes for any other use of software on computers, firmware update to cameras, etc. Do a little research first and be sure you have a way back, or at least don't enter a one-way street with no way back before you know where it is going. I don't have to mention Apple Maps to make the point clear.

Finally, to make it really clear: LR 4 is not a prerequisit for editing Leica M Monochrom or Leica M Type 240 files.

 

Camels by moonlight. Leica M Monochrom
Camels in the moonlight. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. 1600 ISO at 1/6 second. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The final image is the final image
Your images should not be subject to continuous update. You saw them, you took them and made a decision at that point as to how they should look. Leave them like that. That's how the world looked when you took them.

 

Updating the Camera Raw to latest camers
The updating happens automatically. And ... not that it has much to do with this article about the Leiac M Monochrom, but yo may wonder anyways. The Camera Raw profile for Leica M Type 240. It's not out yet, but there is a beta test version here you can download and install till the automatic update happens of the final one: Camera Raw 7.4 Beta

 

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On our way home to the base to import and edit images after a long day. We shot somewhat 4,000 - 5,000 images each during 9 days. 110 GB of images for my part. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95

 

 

What's in your bag, Thorsten Overgaard?

Here's a couple of videos showing what I packed for Qatar, very similar to what I pack in my bags for travel, a days shooting, walking around and such.

In the day to day one should always wear a camera, and unless you have assignments or special things you need to photograph, the travel kit for a Leica M photographer can very well be just a camera and one lens over the shoulder, and then an extra battery and SD-card in the pocket. Stylish, always ready, and never a tired shoulder or painful back from carrying a camera.

Enjoy!

What's in Your Louis Vuitton "iCare" Camera Bag, Thorsten Overgaard from Thorsten Overgaard at Vimeo. Here I am packing a bag for a day in the desert where we drive from location to location.


What's in Your Louis Vuitton "Binocular" Camera Bag, Thorsten Overgaard
from Thorsten Overgaard at Vimeo. Here I am packing my small bag for walking around a whole day.

 

The inside of a bag tells the real quality
The way I shop for bags is that I look for what's inside. The hallmark of a quality bag is that the inside is as high quality as the outside. Examplified in a Fendi bag I saw with calf skin outside, crocodile inside. It was a female bag, but a bag is in my opinion a personal gadget, and the inside of it should fill you with as much pleasure as the outside.

For more #cameraporn
For more bags, straps and all the extra stuff, visit the Page 7 of the Leica M9 article, "Sexy Stuff for the Worlds Most Sexy Camera"

 


Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/0.95. 1600 ISO at 1/3 second. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard

 

 

To be continued ...

 

 

Suggestions for further reading ...

Facebook Leica M Monochrom User Group

"Henri - The Leica M Monochrom" article by Jono Slack who - likewise as he did with the Leica M9 prototype back in 2009 - took the prototype Leica M Monochrom to China and made a beautiful simple article about his experiences. Jonathan Slack has also made some of his DNG files available.

Ming Thein does some very interesting reviews and have started a three-part of the "Leica M Monochrom review" on his blog.

White Smoke Studio blog with wedding photographs taken with the Leica M Monochrom

Erwin Puts has made a very short and precise account of what kind of milestone the Leica M Monochrom and the accompanying new 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0 lens is. His "Leica Monochrom" article is here

Also Sein Reid Reviews www.reidreviews.com have had the Leica M Monochrom prototype out for testing and have written a good review. This is for subscribers so you may want to subscribe (33$ per year).

David Farkas have done a review as well on the Red Dot Forum of the Leica M Monochrom. He has also done a ISO comparison between the Leica M9 and Leica M Monochrom.

Luminous Landscape also have tested the Leica M Prototype and have written about it here.

Steve Huff and guest readers also have written about the Leica M Monochrom.

The street photographer and blogger Eric Kim has written an article about Leica M Monochrom for street photography.

Last, but not least, British based World Press winning photographer and Leica M9 shooter Edmond Terakopian have written the blog post "The King of the Tones?" with a short hands-on review.

 

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– Thorsten Overgaard, March 6, 2013
15,692 images so far on the Leica M Monochrom.

   


Index of Thorsten von Overgaard's user review pages covering Leica M9, Leica M9-P, M-E, Leica M10,
Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom, M 246  as well as Leica Q and Leica SL:

Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M9-P   Links
Leica M10
V 1                                      
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44         What if?
Leica M-D 262 1 2                        
Leica Monochrom 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
A
29
B
29
C
29
D
               
Leica Q 1                            
Leica SL 1 2 3 4 5                               Books

 

 

leica.overgaard.dk
Thorsten Overgaard's Leica Article Index
Leica M cameras:   Leica S:
Leica M10   Leica S1 digital scan camera
Leica M Type 240 and M-P Typ240   Leica S2 digital medium format
Leica M-D Typ 262 and Leica M60   Leica S digital medium format
Leica M Monochrom Typ246 digital rangefinder    
Leica M Monochrom MM digital rangefinder   Leica Cine Lenses:
Leica M9 and Leica M-E digital rangefinder   Leica Cine lenses from CW Sonderoptic
Leica M9-Professional digital rangefinder    
Leica M4 35mm film rangefinder    
Leica M lenses:   Leica SLR cameras:
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica SL 2015 Type 601 mirrorless fullframe
Leica 21mm Leica Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4   Leica R8/R9/DMR film & digital 35mm dSLR cameras
Leica 21mm Super-Angulon-M f/3.4   Leica R10 [cancelled]
Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica R4 35mm film SLR
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH FLE f/1.4 and f/1.4 AA   Leica R3 electronic 35mm film SLR
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leicaflex SL/SL mot 35mm film SLR
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95    
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0 and f/1.2   Leica R lenses:
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f//1.4   Leica 19mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 35mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leitz 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 "rigid" Series II   Leica 50mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4   Leica 60mm Macro-Elmarit f/2.8
Leica 75mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 80mm Summilux-F f/1.4
Leica 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 90mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 90mm Summarit-M f/2.5   Leica 180mm R lenses
Leica 90mm Elmarit f/2.8   Leica 400mm Telyt-R f/6.8
Leitz 90mm Thambar f/2.2   Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
    Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/4.0
     
History and overview:   Small Leica cameras:
Leica History   Leica Q full-frame mirrorless
Leica Definitions   Leica Digilux 2 vintage digital rangefinder
Leica Lens Compendium   Leica Digilux 1
Leica Camera Compendium   Leica X
The Solms factory and Leica Wetzlar Campus   Leica Sofort instant camera
    Leica Minilux 35mm film camera
    Leica CM 35mm film camera
     
Photography Knowledge   Thorsten Overgaard books and education:
Calibrating computer screen for photographers   Thorsten Overgaard Masterclasses & Workshops
Quality of Light   Overgaard Lightroom Survival Kit for Lightroom CC/6
Lightmeters   "Finding the Magic of Light" eBook (English)
Color meters for accurate colors (White Balance)   "Die Magie des Lichts Finden" eBook (German)
White Balance & WhiBal   "Composition in Photography" eBook
Film in Digital Age   "The Moment of Impact in Photography" eBook
Dodge and Burn   "Freedom of Photographic Expression" eBook
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Above: Khalid Al-Thani and me working by the moon light. We devised a technique of using a flashlight for focusing. Now a piece of standard equipment in my photo bag: A flashlight. Leica M Monochrom with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

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LEItz CAmera = LEICA
Founded 1849 in Wetzlar, Germany.

 

Latest Leica M Monochrom Firmware Update

 

 

 

Khalid Al-Thani by Thorsten Overgaard
My host in Qatar, Khalid Al-Thani with his Leica M9 Hermes in the desert. During the nine days we managed to put his Hermes, Monochrom and MP into quite extreme use.

 

 

 

Books by Khalid Al-Thani published at Steidl Books:

Here is My Secret
Here is My Secret (2011)


Language Without Words
Language Without Words (2014)

 

 

 

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Thorsten Overgaard
Thorsten von Overgaard is a Danish writer and photographer, specializing in portrait photography and documentary photography, known for writings about photography and as an educator. Some photos are available as signed editions via galleries or online. For specific photography needs, contact Thorsten Overgaard via e-mail.

Feel free to e-mail to thorsten@overgaard.dk for
advice, ideas or improvements.

 

 


 


 

 






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