Join mailing list by writing your e-mail and hit return on your keyboard:
overgaard.dk contact HOME

 
 
Leica M Type 240 Digital Rangefinder Camera - Page 44
      Thosten von Overgaard on Facebook Thorsten von Overgaard on Twitter Thorsten von Overgaard on Instagram Thorsten von Overgaard on Google+ Thorsten von Overgaard on Leica Fotopark Thorsten von Overgaard on LinkedIn Thorsten von Overgaard on BlipFoto Pinterest Thorsten von Overgaard on Flickr Thorsten Overgaard on YouTube Thorsten Overgaard video on Vimeo Thorsten Overgaard on Tumblr Thorsten von Overgaard on Exposure Thorsten von Overgaard on 500px
Bookmark and Share Clip to Evernote
leica.overgaard.dk    
Leica M Digital Rangefinder Camera - Leica M Type 240
 
The Car. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
   
 
   

Leica M Type 240 Digital Rangefinder Camera - Page 44

 

Index of Thorsten von Overgaard's user review pages covering Leica M9, Leica M9-P, M-E, Leica M10,
Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom, M 246  as well as Leica Q and Leica SL:

Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M9-P   Links
Leica M10
V 1   3                                  
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44         What if?
Leica M-D 262 1 2                        
Leica Monochrom 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
A
29
B
29
C
29
D
               
Leica Q 1         Leica TL2: 1 2              
Leica SL 1 2 3 4 5                               Books


Pre-vision of the Final Image - Focusing the Leica M - Part 3/5

By: Thorsten Overgaard. August 17, 2016. Last edit on August 21, 2016.

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

 

Manual Focus with the Leica EVF-2 Electronic ViewFinder

 

With the Leica M 240, the Leica got Live View which enables you to see what the sensor sees while focusing, when you put the EVF-2 on top of the camera. It made a quantum leap forward in accurate focusing and previewing exposure.

 

Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95
. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

65 years later … The Electronic VisoFlex

After 100 years of almost unchanged proportions and usability, now sits a modern electronic attachment on top of the Leica M camera. I can't wait to get a Leica M with a built-in electronic viewfinder and I am sure we will see one such around September 19, 2016 when Photokina in Germany kicks off.

It’s called an Electronic ViewFinder (EVF), or “Electronic VisoFlex” as Leica calls it (with a reference back to the VisoFlex attachment they made in 1951, so the Leica M film cameras with screw-mount lenses had a built-in mirror).

The EVF-2 has turned out to be indispensable for me. I’ve used it a lot, and the only problem I have with it is that it sits on top of the camera and ruins the classic industrial design of the Leica M.

 

Leica Visoflex EVF2 electronic viewfinder
  The Leitz VisoFlex came out in 1951 as a way to implement a mirror ona Leica M. The first version exist for screw mount lenses and M mount lenses.
Leica Visoflex EVF2 electronic viewfinder.
You can also use the Olympus VF-2 which essentially is the same.

 

 

The Leitz VisoFlex came out in 1951 as a way to implement a mirror on a Leica M. The first version exist for screw mount lenses and M mount lenses.
     

 


Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95
. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

The Polaroid of digital cameras

The EVF allows me to see the image I am about to make very precisely in terms of exposure, sharpness, depth of field and the actual frame I am getting.

Not only that, right after I make the photograph, the EVF-2 also shows me a preview of the photograph. This allows me to see if I got what I wanted: did I get the expression I wanted, did I get the person walking past me, how does the background work and much more.

 

Actor Terence Hines in Los Angeles. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Actor Terence Hines in Los Angeles. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.


It's very much like what a Polaroid test-photo did in the old days. Those Polaroid test photos were made to make sure everything was in focus, that the exposure was correct, that the composition worked and that every detail was taken care of. It took a lot of time, effort and money but it was the way to do a professional photograph in the studio or on a set not that many years ago when there were only film cameras.

With the Leica M 240 and the EVF-2, it’s all back, implemented at no cost and as a constant quality control of what you do.

 

Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Ansel Adams and (pre-) visualization

Ansel Adams realized when he was 25 years that he had to learn to visualizethe final print already when working with the camera in the field.

His visualization must be understood as two levels of prediction:

One is to have the knowledge and ability to predict how the current scene will look in a negative and what can be done in the darkroom for the final print with that negative.

The second level of prevision is the ability to see how it will technically work; and then make an artistic visualization of how to get the emotional impact you want (with the implied changes of the "correct" technical result).

 

Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

You start out with proper focus, correct exposure and correct white balance. That’s the visualization that require technical skills. Then you decide that you want to colors to be much warmer, the focus to be shallower, and the sky to be rally dark. That’s the (pre-)visualization that requires technical skills and an idea how to depart from that (and technical skills on how to get to that result).

 

Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The EVF gives you a great deal of prevision of the final result, and I’m sure Ansel Adams would have loved to be able to see the prevision already when hanging on some mountain side.

You put on a red filter and already before you press the shutter, you can actually see a prevision of how it will look. It’s actually pretty amazing. Maybe not as sportsman-like as not knowing, but who would blame you if the final photograph looks amazing?

 

Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

         
 

Buy the new eBook
"The Freedom of Photographic Expression"
by Thorsten Overgaard

 
         
 

"The Freedom of Photographic Expression" by Thorsten Overgaard

"The Freedom of
Photographic Expression"
eBook for computer, Kindle and iPad
October 2016 (268 pages)

 

In this easy to read and apply eBook,
Thorsten Overgaard takes beginners and experienced photographers through the basics of controlling the light and the camera.
This book covers the technical side of photography from beginners level to semi-pro, features a number of photographs by Thorsten Overgaard and chapters on his philosophy on photography.

Only $148

     
 

Buy Now

Add to Cart

Instant Delivery

 
     

View Cart

 
 

 

"I've bought the new book - made a start reading it - it is really interesting.
I know it’s basic at the beginning but it isn't written in a patronizing way. I have been taking photographs for many years and have been lucky enough to be paid to take them for the last seven years; but it's always good to be taken back to the start"
P. S. (UK)

 

""Really enjoy your writing and teaching"
D. K. (USA)

"I love your insights on photography."
D.B. (USA)

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

 

 

 

 

The Leica EVF takes a swivel

One of the things you get used to with the EVF-2 is that the EVF swivel 45 degree up so you can in fact "look down" in the EVF-2 while the camera records what is in front of it.

I've seen people do that for street photography as it gives a good level to work from, with that added feature that people don't notice you are taking pictures.

The reson people don't notice you is that you don't have eye contact with them and doesn't seem to have any attention on them. This can be done also by simply being begind your camera and not make eye contact with people. But that's another story.

You get so used to this feature that when you get to use the Leica SL or Leica Q that doesn't have this feature, you miss it.

 

The Leice EVF can take a 45 degree swivel up.
The Leice EVF can take a 45 degree swivel up.

 

 

"Not like the old days"

They have a saying in the England that "nothing is like the old days" and that is one slogan I think many Leica users would applaud and agree with. At least ‘til they have tried the EVF-2 electronic viewfinder.

I have had people in my workshops who have given up Leica M because they couldn't focus. Generally, there has been an idea amongst Leica users that the EVF-2 just isn’t a real Leica, so that prevented some from getting to try one. They simply hadn’t heard about it.

 


Never to old to hang out on street corners. Paris, May 2014. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 II. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The blind leading the blind

I met one guy who had bought the Leica M and some lenses, but when he felt he couldn’t get the focus right, he sold it all and bought a professional Nikon with lenses. When he attended my workshop a couple of years ago, his astonishment that the EVF-2 existed was great, and it solved all the problems he had. So he sold the Nikon gear and bought a Leica M again, this time with an EVF.

 

Shanghai. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Shanghai. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

It’s not impossible to focus the rangefinder, but if you think it’s too difficult, there is nothing wrong with using an EVF.

I mean, look around. If you don’t see the EVF coming in as the future, you’d better look again. The EVF is what enables them to make a mirrorless Hasselblad.  It’s what makes it possible for many professional photographers to use a smaller camera most of the time (and only a dSLR for very specific things).

The rangefinder is charming. Yes, but it’s not the only way to do it.

 

Emirates from Jakarta to Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Emirates from Jakarta to Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The glass plate photography is back

Even when glass plates were replaced by the much more economical and handy film plates, Ansel Adams and others would still use glass plates. Considering that a landscape photographer back then in the 1930’s had to carry a large wooden camera with large lenses and fragile glass plates up and down mountains, it would have been so much easier to just go with film.

Even in the 1960’s you could order glass plates for large format cameras. It wasn’t easy to get, but they were available for the patient and ambitious photographer.

The point in using glass plates was (and is) that the focal plane is very precise. The film may move or bend slightly in a camera, but the glass plate stays 100% plane.

With digital sensors in the first digital rangefinder (the Leica M8 that came out on September 14, 2006) we achieved unheard-of precision in a 35mm camera.

 


Actor Terence Hines. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. This photo is with available soft light from the windows covered with white curtails. You can read about in The Story Behind That Picture "The Hollywood Murder", my photo session with actor Terence Hines. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

To begin with – let’s be frank about this – it created some new problems. Suddenly we discovered that we weren’t as great at taking sharp photographs as we previously thought.

The digital sensor was merciless and showed each little departure from exact focus. It was easy to tell because in a matter of minutes we could now import the photograph to the computer and zoom in on each little detail.

We also learned that the Depth of Field scale on the lenses wasn’t made for digital sensors. When the DOF scale said the lens would perform acceptable focus from 3 feet to 5 feet, we learned that this was in the film days. In the digital age, the acceptable sharpness was reduced.

 

Men in black in Rue de Beaujolais, Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Men in black in Rue de Beaujolais, Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.


Heck, the whole idea of what acceptable sharpness was, suddenly took a quantum leap in a disappointing direction.

With the EVF-2 electronic viewfinder that reads directly from the digital sensor, we finally have a tool that is suitable for achieving the accuracy we want.

So let’s look at how it works.

 

The ZOO in Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
The ZOO in Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Focus Aid and Focus Peaking

The Leica M 240 offers Focus Aid (zooming in on the image) and Focus Peaking (colored outlines of sharp edges) to help you focus.

The colored lines require contrast and your image does not always have that. You will fairly quickly train your eye to look at the actual image and see when it is sharp. You don't a need red outlines to see when something is in focus.

 

Red outline isn't always sharp

You should know that the red outlines, when created by contrast, simply means there is a high contrast edge. This is not the same as optimum focus.

Expscially with wide angle lenses, the range of "acceptable focus" or "red outline" is much wider than for tele lenses, so particularity with wide angle lenses, you may find that what had a red outline, is in fact not in focus in the final image.

With a Noctilux at f/0.95, the focus is so narrow that often, when you see the red outline, it is in fact in focus.

 

The office of fashion designer Bolongaro Trevor. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
The office of fashion designer Bolongaro Trevor. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.


It’s a question I constantly get, “I don’t see the red lines”, and that’s the explanation. Sometimes you just don’t get them because there are no edges of hard contrast in the image.

It’s a bad habit from automatic cameras to wait for a green light or beep to tell you everything is OK to shoot. But with manual focus you never get any acknowledgement from the camera. The red outline is a help you sometimes will get, but mostly don’t wait for it. Just look at the image in the EVF. When it looks sharp, it’s sharp.

Another thing that makes the lines hard to see is the fact that they are small. I for one am thankful that the lines are rather discrete, because if one looks through the Sony A7 the red outline is so dramatic it disturbs the composition.

 

Wedding outside Cafe Les Foudres in Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Wedding outside Cafe Les Foudres in Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

If you have used the matte screen of an SLR in the past when they were bright and accurate (as in Nikon 3F HP) or the current Leica S, you will know that a complete matte screen without the divided "focusing field" in the middle is more accurate to use than the "focusing field". It's just a matter of habit and trust in what you see rather than what some electronics tell you.

 

Stars and stripes in Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M f/1.4 AA. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Stars and stripes in Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M f/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Setting up the Leica M for Focus Aid (zoom to focus)

When the Leica M comes from the factory, it’s set up with Manual Focus Aid. That means you have to press the front button on the camera to turn it on. Unfortunately, the factory setting also means that the Focus Aid doesn’t zoom in on the image.

Obviously, you don’t see the point in focus aid if it doesn’t do anything. But when you have activated Focus Aid (by pressing the front button), you can change the zoom that Focus Aid is supposed to provide by turning the thumb wheel and choosing 1X, 5X or 10X enlargement of the image.

Aha! Now you see what it does. It zooms in 5X or 10X on the image so you can see when it's in focus!

 

Playing. Leica M 240 with Leica Cine 100mm Summicron-C f/2.0. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Playing. Leica M 240 with Leica Cine 100mm Summicron-C f/2.0. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

In the Menu of the camera you should immediately change the Focus Aid from Manual to Automatic. This will make the camera turn on Focus Aid automatically when you touch the focus ring on the lens.

All Leica M lenses, even the old screw mount lenses from the 1930’s, activates the focus in the camera. There’s a metal ring inside the lens that touches and moves the focus mechanism in the camera.

All M lenses then work with Automatic Focus Aid. Only Leica R lenses, Leica Cine lenses and other brand lenses mounted on the Leica M requires you to press the Manual Focus Aid button on the front.

The Focus Aid turns off when you touch the shutter release slightly. So keep you finger off the shutter release when you focus. Then when you touch the shutter release, the EVF-2 goes back to full frame so you can frame the photo and take the it.  

 

 

1 X Focus Aid   5 x Focus Aid   10 X Focus Aid
         
   
The full frame at x 1   The image enlarged x 5 times   The image enlarged x 10 times
         

The Thumb-Wheel is the one that you use to scroll
between X 1 and X 5 and X 10 preview size in the EVF-2.

I recommend you use X 5 for most things,
maybe x10 with very wide lenses like 21mm and 18mm.

  The Thumb-Wheel is the one that you use to scroll  between X 1 and X 5 and X 10 preview size in the EVF-2.  I recommend you use X 5 for most things,  maybe x10 with very wide lenses like 21mm and 18mm.
         
The four corners that make frame lines in the middle are a little confusing. They illustrate what part of the image will be visible if you use X 10 Focus Aid. I never use them. All I ever got out of them is a lot of e-mails asking what they are there for.
The four corners that make frame lines in the middle are a little confusing. They illustrate what part of the image will be visible if you use X 10 Focus Aid. I never use them. All I ever got out of them is a lot of e-mails asking what they are there for.
         

 

 

Focus Peaking explained (red outline)

 
  The red outline of red is not always easy to see.
   

Focus Peaking is the outlines on the screen or inside the EVF-2 of where the image has high contrast (sharpness). If there is no high contrast, there will be no Focus Peaking visible.

In the Leica M 240 the outlines can be set to Red, Blue or Green. I prefer Red as it is easily visible in my black & white image preview. Blue or Green might work better for others, especially if the image preview is in color.

 

 

London. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
London. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Black & White Preview explained

In the beginning, the Leica M 240 offered you the possibility to photograph both DNG and JPG at the same time.

Not much reason to photograph JPG pictures in colors when you photograph DNG. The colors and all of the DNG are so much better when you work them over a little in Lightroom.

So I would set the JPG to black & white so as to get the DNG in colors (it is always on color as it’s the full raw data of all that the sensor records) and the JPG in black and white. When editing in Lightroom, I would see the same photograph in color and black and white and it would be very easy to see which worked best in what, or if both the color and the black & white editions worked well.

 


Happy friends in Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

This setting also meant that the preview in the EVF-2 would be in black and white only. I prefer that because the colors aren’t that accurate or important to preview. The exposure is, and that is actually easier to preview in black & white than colors. And on top of that, the red outline (when it is there) is easier to spot when the rest of the preview is in black & white.

With a later firmware update Leica made it so you can photograph DNG only, but if you set the camera to black & white preview in the Menu under Film Mode, the preview is black & white without you ever have to make or download a JPG file.


Alexis Khoo working her Leica in Singapore. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Alexis Khoo working her Leica in Singapore. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Focus Aid explained (zoom to focus)

Focus Aid is the button on front of the Leica M 240. You press the button and there will be a preview of the focus. While focusing with Focus Aid you can scroll the thumb wheel to choose between 1X, 5X or 10X enlargement.

I recommend 5X as that is enlarged enough to see focus. 10X may be helpful to see minor details for example when using a 21mm super wide lens. But mainly 5X is the setting of enlargement.

The menu should be set to Automatic as then you don't have to press the button on the front of the camera anymore. The focus mechanism on Leica M lenses automatically activates the focus aid. When you press the shutter release gently the EVF-2 goes from 5X enlargement to 1X so you see the full image you are composing. So don't press the shutter release at the same time as the Automatic Focus Aid then is not showing.

 

Princess Joy Villa in the gym for a series for MOST Fitness Magazine about her "Total Body in 10 Moves" program.Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Princess Joy Villa in the gym for a series for MOST Fitness Magazine about her "Total Body in 10 Moves" program.Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The way to use Focus Aid, explained

The way to use it is 1) turn the focus barrel on the lens and focus on the main subject in the image, then 2) press the shutter release gently to get the full image (which now is in focus) so as to compose the image and cropping.

 

A bicycle in my hometown Aarhus, Denmark. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
A bicycle in my hometown Aarhus, Denmark.
Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

EVF doesn't care if the focusing mechanism is out of focus

One of the other advantages of the Leica EVF-2 is that when it reads the image from the digital sensor, the rangefinder mechanism can be out of adjustment and it doesn’t influence the focusing.

I got so used to the Leica M 240 with the EVF-2 that this became my preferred way of focusing for a long time.

 


Morning tea in London. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Using the new camera back in March 2013 and giving it a rough time, I managed to displace the rangefinder mechanism. As the EVF isn't susceptible to being displaced, it was an easy choice to use the EVF.

For me it meant that during the first three months of using the new Leica M 240 I had to use the EVF, as my rangefinder mechanism had to go back to Leica in Wetzlar to get adjusted. Then when it was adjusted, I had gotten so used to the EVF-2 that I kept using it.

 

Chess in Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Chess in Sydney. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The EVF always reads the image from the sensor, and if that one if in focus, the final image is also. I'm stipulating this as a fact as I have had a few questions coming up from people who had trouble focusing their Leica M 240 with EVF and thought the EVF was wrong.

It is simply not possible that the focus is off when it is in focus in the EVF. Period.

But what is possible, is the same phenomena as with the rangefinder: you are sure that you’ve nailed the focus, but then when you get back to the computer, there is back focus (the focus sits a little further back than what you focused at).

 


Banksey in London (Clipstone Street). Leica M 240 with Leitz 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 "rigid" Series II. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

In the rangefinder mechanism it is possible that the rangefinder needs adjustment. When it does, it’s mostly back focus and rarely front focus (the focus sits a little in front of what you focused at).

What happens when you focus and then photograph somebody or something, is that they move or you move. That’s why you will still see back focus in some photos made with the EVF-2.

 


Shanghai. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Focusing a Leica M with EVF-2 digital viewfinder

The EVF-2 is a somewhat alien instrument and may feel wrong on a Leica M. But you must get over that, and frankly, if you haven't tried the EVF-2, you are missing out.

As simple as that.

The hurdle with the EVF-2 is that it is terribly ugly and that it is slow. When I used it all the time for the first three months back when I got the first Leica M 240, I simply got used to the rhythm of the EVF-2.


Tokyo. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Tokyo. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

A couple of years later I decided that I wanted to use the Leica 50mm APO exclusively for a couple of months to see if I could increase my affinity for this lens.

It’s far from as sensitive to focusing precision as the Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 that I use most of the time. So I decided to take off the EVF-2 and use the rangefinder.

The smaller size of the 50mm APO invited to simplify my setup, and I really liked it. I liked it so much that when I put on the Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 again and used its razor-thin focus, I kept the EVF-2 off the camera.

 

Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Paris. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Built-in diopter adjustment

The EVF-2 has built-in diopter so you can adjust for your eyesight. The way to set it is to look into the EVF and when the text is crisp and clear, the focus is ideal.

The diopter ring tends to get loose and turn by itself when you walk with the camera. I’ve solved this by putting a piece of isolating tape under it so it stays where I want it.

 

The garden 8:00 AM at The Manor Hotel (Chateau Elysee) in Hollywood. This is my office in the morning when in Los Angeles. Did you notice where the focus is ... and did it matter? Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
The garden 8:00 AM at The Manor Hotel (Chateau Elysee) in Hollywood. This is my office in the morning when in Los Angeles. Did you notice where the focus is ... and did it matter?
Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Limited time offer for my readers from Serge Ramelli:
Serge Ramelli Landscape Masterclass
When Serge Ramelli attended my workshop we spoke about letting my readers have some of his courses in Lightroom at special prices. This is the first one. Simply click on the link and use the code: THORSTEN to get 60% off the price.

 

 

 

“I can’t focus without the EVF”

Using the EVF-2 has the back side that you lose confidence that you can focus without it.  When in fact, you can focus with the rangefinder, and it’s actually much easier than you thought.

You don’t need the EVF-2. Almost 100 years of Leica camera models without it document that it isn’t necessary to use the EVF.

 

The car. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
The car. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

“I can’t stand the EVF-2”

When I finally put on the EVF-2 again, I was surprised how slow it was. The sound of the shutter becomes sticky and slow. The reason for this is that when you use Live View, the shutter curtain goes up when you turn the camera on. It stays up, so when you take a photograph, there is a slight delay (and some extra mechanical noise) because the shutter curtain first has to close, then open to take the photo, close again when the exposure is over, and then open again so the Live View works.

This is a lot of movement and a lot of unfamiliar noise compared to a traditional Leica M.

 


Nirata Airport, Tokyo. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Also, the EVF-2 is set up so you see a one second preview of the photo you just took. You can turn off the preview in the Menu, but then you still will be getting a 1 second blackout. So you might as well set preview to 1 second in the menu. Better looking at something for 1 second than nothing!

If you take a burst (series) of photographs, you see the last photograph in the burst for 1 second in the EVF-2.

For us who wear glasses, the rubber ring on the EVF leave smudges of rubber. The Leica SL and Leica Q do the same because it’s soft rubber. The Leica M also has plastic around the rangefinder viewfinder so that it doesn’t scratch the glasses; but that is hard plastic and it doesn’t leave smudges at all. Genius design, actually.

Take a note, Leica Camera AG. No more soft rubber rings around viewfinders.  

 

Per Hildebrant working the Leica X-Vario in the Paris Workshop. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Per Hildebrant working the Leica X-Vario in the Paris Workshop. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Not to make anybody wrong, it should be pointed out that the EVF is a great tool for anyone who wear glasses to see more of the frame, or actually the whole frame. That is extremely helpful when working with wide angle lenses. Wearing glasses and using the rangefinder in the Leica M, your view is usually limited to a 40mm frame.

 

 

Disneyland, California. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPHERICAL F/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Disneyland, California. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPHERICAL F/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

When to use the EVF-2

When I do assignments where I need to make sure the focus is accurate, I will use the EVF-2.

I sort of like the freedom and speed of the rangefinder, but I also like the precision of the EVF-2.

Often I will photograph some of a photo session with the EVF-2 and a portion without. It’s two different styles.

With the EVF-2 on the camera for portraits I get the precision and can focus on the subject’s eyes with a precision that was unheard of before. But then after I take the photo, I can’t see the subject for 1 second.

 

Princess Joy Villa in Shanghai. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Princess Joy Villa in Shanghai. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

I fake it, because the subject doesn’t know. I keep the camera in front of my eyes and wait for the preview to disappear. Then I set the focus again and give the subject the next instruction. They have no idea that I just “lost them” for a second.

Without the EVF-2 I have a real-time view of the subject through the rangefinder all the time and can react to it, take photos when they make a special expression, and I can work much faster. But … with less precision.

Well, actually not less precision. But with less guarantee for the result.

I recently had a Leica M 240 that went out of focus. It seldom happens, so I had been photographing for two days before I noticed that something was actually wrong. There were simply too many weird out-of-focus photographs.

So I checked the focus, and yes, it was off.

 

Richard Williams in Shanghai. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Richard Williams in Shanghai. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

When I had to photograph an actor a week later, one was out and the other was perfectly aligned. So I used both cameras. One with the EVF-2 and one without. The advantage being that I know that my focus will be perfect with the EVF-2. And I also know I wouldn’t be able to have him fly out again for another photo session if my focus had been off.

So that is the way I use the EVF-2, almost as the Polaroid in the old days. A test then of things to make sure every detail is perfect.

 

Robin hanging out in LA. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0.
Robin hanging out in LA.
Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0.

 

Overheating and freezing the Leica M

One of the new things that came with the EVF-2 was overheating of the Leica M. The fact that the Live View heats up the sensor and thus the camera’s electronics, resulted in the camera simply freezing.

I found that it would for sure freeze when used in even normal room temperature. If you had a not-too-hot day in New York and you worked with the EVF-2 in the sunshine, the camera would for sure freeze after 5-15 minutes.

With freeze, I mean the camera would stop responding, or the EVF woild lock up in black or white. Or simply just not work.

But even on a very cold day, the Leica M 240 would freeze too.

 

Mr. Grant in Hollywood. Leica M 240 withLeica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.2. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Mr. Grant in Hollywood. Leica M 240 withLeica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.2. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Several firmware updates have come about and each promised that this phenomenon would now happen less. Which might be true, but it still happened from time to time, and mostly at the most inconvenient times (while in the middle of a photo session).

With the current firmware, it doesn’t happen that often, if ever. But sometimes the EVF-2 will go completely white or completely black so you can’t see anything.

The remedy for a frozen camera or EVF-2 is to turn off the camera and turn it on again. If that doesn’t remedy it, take out the battery (to reset the camera completely) and then insert the battery again.

I won’t spend much more energy on this issue, as it’s not as troublesome as it was in 2013 when the Leica M 240 came out. It’s annoying when it happens, but it doesn’t happen that often anymore.

 

Cimetiere du Pere Lauchaise in Paris. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Cimetiere du Pere Lauchaise in Paris. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

 
 

 

 

Cleaning contacts of the EVF-2

The reason for the EVF-2 going black or white and not showing any preview can also be dirt in the connection to the camera. I’ve had people reporting that after they cleaned the contacts with alcohol, the problem disappeared.

 


Alex Marton in Hollywood. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Battery usage and the Leica EVF-2

The battery in the Leica M 240 is really powerful. It was made to support Live View and video.

Video is something that drains a lot of power because both the sensor and the buffer (writing the data to the SD-card) is working hard.

If you plan to use a Leica M 240 for video, don’t leave home without three batteries.

For a day out and about with using the EVF-2, the first battery will be drained after 5 hours or so. So always have two batteries.

If you use the rangefinder, the battery will last for more than a day.

 

Fitzroy Square in London. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Fitzroy Square in London. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Advanced light metering and battery usage

Be advised that if you have set the light metering in the Leica M 240 to Advanced, this is the same as Live View as the sensor is exposed all the time and the light metering works off the preview of the image. Even if you are not looking at that Live View, it’s active for the light meter. So this, obviously, will eat just as much battery as using the EVF.

 

London. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
London. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

If you haven’t tried it

From my own experience and the many users who I see in my workshops, my estimate would be that 70% of the current Leica M 240 users would buy the Leica M with a built-in electronic viewfinder.

Over time a Leica M with a traditional viewfinder would be an excellent object to own and admire, just as the Leica MP is the perfect film camera with admirable technical and industrial design qualities.

 


REMM Hotel in Ginza, Tokyo. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Next EVF in the next Leica M

The Leica Q and the Leica SL point towards the next EVF we will see in the Leica M 241 (or Leica M 11 we might hope it would be called)

The Leica Q shows how fast and elegant a Leica can be. The EVF in the Leica Q is far ahead of any other EVF’s in similar cameras. The resolution and image quality is really great. It works so there is no black screen between photographs. Part of the reason for this is the computer-power of the buffer and the overall camera operation. It’s just faster. But also, the camera doesn’t have a shutter curtain that has to close and then go up and down to take a photograph.

 

Paris Nights at Restaurant Aux Lyonnais. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Paris Nights at Restaurant Aux Lyonnais. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2015-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Leica SL which is the new Pro camera from Leica has an even better EVF. The optics in front of the EVF is brilliant, wide and bright so you can easily see the screen, which in itself is another step up in image quality.

The Leica SL electronic viewfinder is so precise and so bright that many sold their Leica M 240 and bought a Leica SL to use for their Leica M lenses. Suddenly it was possible to see the image so clearly that, without zooming in, you can comfortably focus a Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 or a Leica tele lens.

The Leica SL doesn’t have a shutter either, so a much faster, almost instant, operation, and no “blackout” between photographs.

 


London rain. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Leica M11 or Leica M 241

The next Leica M is definitely coming, and likely it will be announced at Photokina 2016.

There are several possibilities for how it will integrate an EVF, but it’s unlikely that it won’t have one. It could be another add-on on top of the camera, but much faster and maybe even prettier and more durable than the EVF-2.

 

Zhi Min Wu in China. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Zhi Min Wu in China. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Another possibility is a Leica M model with integrated EVF. They must have been speculating till the grey hairs stared growing at Leica Camera AG in Wetzlar: “Just how important is the rangefinder for the Leica M users?”

When the EVF-2 came out, nobody liked it. Now many use it.

Back then I predicted that Leica would make a Leica M with EVF built-in and a traditional Leica M without EVF. I don’t know if that’s going to happen. But for sure, a new and better EVF solution will come for the Leica M. That’s a given.

 


Working the Leica M 240 in Paris. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Updating the EVF-2

The Leica M 240 was constructed in a way that EVF can’t be updated. It’s made by Epson and used by both Olympus and Leica. When Olympus came out with an updated EVF, it worked for them, but the same EVF didn’t work for the Leica.

For the Leica M 240 there is only one EVF that fits, and that’s the one and only EVF-2.

So no matter what else happens, you won’t be able to upgrade the EVF-2 on the Leica M 240.

 


Sydney. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.


 

Another EVF bites the dust

The EVF is made by Epson for Leica (and Olympus) and is not exactly a piece of Leica engineering though it has gotten a design by Leica that resembles the VisoFlex.

It's a strange piece of electronics added to the top of the camera and as such it doesn't fit into the industrial design of the Leica body. And perhaps more importantly, it easily gets damaged. I drop my Leicas several times a year, either by accident or simply bang into things or drop them a little too hard on the table.

It's not really a problem for the Leica M, but for the EVF it is. I am on my fourth EVF now in three years.

 

Paris apartment. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Paris apartment. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Lightroom Survival Kit

 

 


Mr. Flavio
When in Rome in May I photographed three men talking by a cafe. One of them, Flavio, came over to me and asked, and then invited me to come see his apartment inside the courtyard. He wanted to show how painters and artists used to live in the high-ceiling spaces with large windows before this area of Rome became one of the most expensive. I learned later that this is a very sought-after location for movie crews and location scouts, hence the people who live there is very protective and it is almost impossible to get in. I did some portraits of him, as well as this one. The space was purely his working space. A large apartment with lots of books, and he put on some classic music on the cassette deck(!) to create a nice atmosphere. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95
. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

 

         
 

Buy the new eBook
"A Little Book on Photography"
by Thorsten von Overgaard

 
         
 

A Little Book on Photography by Thorsten von Overgaard eBook

Order now - Instant delivery.

More info

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

 

It's a humorous understatement to call this
new eBook by Thorsten Overgaard for
"A Little Book on Photography".
It's a grand book, a history lesson, life experience, a biography and poetry book and brilliant photo book!
All in one beautiful package of 180 pages
to fire you up and get you to love
photography ... unconditionally!

"A Little Book on Photography"
eBook for computer, Kindle and iPad.
New release March 2017.
Intro price only $47 - 180 pages.

     
 

Buy Now

Add to Cart

Instant Delivery

 
     

View Cart

 
 

 

 
     
 
     
 

 

 

 

 


Neon at Hollywood Blvd Vine Street in Hollywood. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPHERICAL F/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Night vision and the EVF - Seeing in the dark

The EVF shows the image as if in daylight. Only when you press the shutter release slightly down do you then see the preview of the exposure. Until then it is as a daylight photo, even in the darkest places. That is obviously very helpful when it is dark.

 

The Grammys. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
The Grammys. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

           
 

Join the NEW Thorsten von Overgaard
Photography Extension Course

"My wife game me this course and I absolutely love it.
Now I think more in light and shadows. Used a lot of the techniques on a recent trip and
my photos have improved a lot. Well done, Thorsten!"
S.N. (Mexico)

"I am happy with my purchase of the extension course. Well written, easy to understand"
K.D. (USA)

“I very much enjoy the incredible knowledge”
V.V. (United Kingdom)

"Addictive, beautifully and simplistically written. Just amazing. Cleared my concepts"
V.P. (USA)

"The extension course is the best course I read about photography (and I'm still at the beginning)"
M.S. (Luxembourg)

"I'm already in page 81 of the Extension Course, and your communication and words provoked a change in me at an aesthetic level that I felt but I couldn't explain"
C.L. (USA)

 
           
  Join the NEW Thorsten von Overgaard Photography Extension Course  
           
           
 

The NEW
Overgaard Photography Extension Course

The waiting list is over!

After a couple of years with a long waiting list, I have finally redesigned the course so I can handle the students interested in this course. Not only that. The number of pages has gone up from 120 to 330..!

I teach you the basics of photography in an easy-to-understand and step-by-step way that anyone from age 12 to 90 years can understand and easily apply. This extension course is for everyone from 12-90 years. 

The intention with this extension course is to get you going in your photography adventure with lightning speed and inspire you to reach to new heights.

Enjoy!

Specially tailored for Leica and digital photographers.

You work at your own pace after you recieve the full package of material via mail. It works as PDF on computer, iPad, Kindle, or - if you like - make your own print.

More info --->

   

Join the Home School for
Leica and Digital Photographers

The Thorsten Overgaard New Extension Course 2016

Only $798.00

Add to Cart

View Cart

Buy now. Instant delivery by mail.

ITEM #1708-2016

Note: If you have bought The Overgaard Extension Course (2010) previously you may enroll on this new course for free. Simply e-mail me.

 
 

 

 

       

 

 

Peter Wais in San Francisco. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Peter Wais in San Francisco. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

New exciting possibilities with the EVF-2

The EVF-2 for the first time makes it possible to focus lenses without focus coupling to the Leica M rangefinder. You can mount any lenses you can find an adapter for, including Leica R lenses, Leica Cine lenses, Canon, Nikon and more.

 

Working with #lenses in #hollywood by #leica #photographer #thorstenovergaard #noctilux #summicron #cine

A photo posted by Thorsten von Overgaard (@thorstenovergaard) on

 

Macro and EVF

Also using a Macro adapter is now a possibility on the Leica M 240. The OUFRO adapter from the 1970's is my favorite as it moves the lens 10mm away from the camera and thus brings you closer, but not too close.

Leica Camera AG also made a Leica M Macro Adapter which brings you even closer; and then you can "zoom" it to bring you really close.

 

OUFRO on the Leica M Type 240
OUFRO on the Leica M Type 240 for macro. OUFRO is an original Leitz Extension Ring (produced 1959-1983 as part no. 16469Y). OUFRO can even be stacked withs everal of the at a time for greater magnification and will work on the Leica M Type 240 as macro for all lenses, including the Noctilux, 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0 (as shown on this picture) and even 21mm lenses. With the EVF-2 and Live View you see the image crisp and sharp, easy to focus. The 90mm f/4.0 or f/2.0 would be my preferred macro lens. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

Leica Macro Adapter M
An easily overlooked detail is that the macro ring is variable! It is very neatly designed and is a real piece of Leica engeneering. One turns the ring and it expands, as simple as that. $690 at BH Photo.

 

Leitz OUFRO and Leica M Macro adapter
As can be seen in this image, the extent of macro (how far out the lens is moved from the Leica M body) is different from the OUFRO to the Leica M Macro adapter.
The OUFRO is a compact choice for traveling and have close range possibilities. The Leica M Macro adapter gets you even closer.

 

Size proportions for the Leica Macro M adapter and the OUFRO

         
   
Leica Macro Adapter closest   Leica Macro Adapter widest   The Leitz OUFRO
         

 

China. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
China. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Leica M with auto focus

Why hasn't Leica made an auto focus, when that would obviously be easier to deal with?

Maybe they will one day.

 

When the Leica III came out, Leica promoted it as "automatic focusing". What they referred to was of course that now - thanks to brand new technology - you could look through the viewfinder and find the accurate focus. Before that you had to guess the distance to the subject and then set the dial on the lens accordingly. Not very precise, and not suitable for low light lenses with narrow DOF (Depth Of Field).
When the Leica III came out, Leica promoted it as "automatic focusing". What they referred to was of course that now - thanks to brand new technology - you could look through the viewfinder and find the accurate focus. Before that you had to guess the distance to the subject and then set the dial on the lens accordingly. Not very precise, and not suitable for low light lenses with narrow DOF (Depth Of Field).

 

It would be foolish to say that Leica Camera AG is so great that everything they do is the best. The matter of the fact is that they have chosen a technology that on one hand gives some possibilities for control, on the other hand restricts what one can do.

It's a well-known fact that Leica invented auto focus back 40-50 years ago but deemed it so unwanted by users that they sold the patent! It could be classified as a bummer, or minimally a wrong estimation of reality. As in the famous estimations that nobody would ever want a telephone, or that nobody would ever want a personal computer.

 


Robin and her tutor Terry in Hollywood. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPHERICAL F/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

In practical terms a manual lens that is made into an auto focus gets lighter and less durable to drops and hits. To make room for the motors inside the lens that focus the lens, everything has to be smaller and lighter. At least, that's how it has been with Nikon and Canon lenses.

One of the things Leica Camera AG have been playing with has been making auto focus by moving the sensor.

If it is a realistic dream or just a cool sounding idea, I am not the one to judge. I know it has been on the drawing table along with other ways to offer auto focus.

 

China. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
China. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

I wonder how you would move the sensor enough to achieve the focus when the lens element often has to move half an inch or more to achieve the focus. I could also think of a system where the user focuses and the camera then fine-tunes the focus.

Or perhaps like on the Leica S where the camera auto focuses but the user can then fine-tune the focus manually.

One of the advantages with manual focus is the control of focus. Auto focus will put the focus on the nose or the glasses on a face, even though the photographer wanted the eyes to be in focus. It’s out of control in a way that manual focus isn’t.

I don’t think it is in the future of the Leica M system to have auto focus. The Leica SL came, and that is definitely an auto focus system.

 

San Francisco in the fog. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0.
San Francisco in the fog.
Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0.

 

 

The next thing

There is no doubt in my mind that the next integrated viewfinder we will be seeing in a future Leica M will be either an indirect Live View as in the Fuji below ... or simply a straight Live View and no analog view as was the case in the Leica Digilux 2 that came to market in 2004, as well as in the Leica SL from 2015 and the Leica Q from 2015.

 


The Fuji X100 camera was - apart from being very complicated to use - the first really smart combination of the analog viewfinder, combined with an LCD screen for preview of what the sensor saw, as well as focusing. The LCD would zoom in on a detail of the image so you could focus, then return to the full image so you could frame it correctly. It was a really awful smart idea!

 

In all fairness, the reason this type of viewfinder didn't find its way into the Leica M 240 is not because they are still writing everything with fountain pens on handmade paper. Stefan Daniel who is product manager at Leica Camera AG certainly has drawings of the next two or three generations of the Leica M on the wall that he and the team works on consistently as they work their way through samples of new electronic gadgets that may or may not be implemented in a future Leica model.

 

Denmark, September 2014. The DAnish Prime Minister (upper left corner) does a selfie with school kids in Denmark. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
The Danish Prime Minister (upper left corner) does a selfie with school kids in Denmark, September 2014.
Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Already in 2010, a year after the Leica M9 was released, product manager at Leica Camera AG, Stefan Daniel was talking about Live View and electronic viewfinders, and the possibility of it being good enough for the next camera following Leica M9. This was at a meeting with 120 members of LHSA (The Leica Historical Society), and it was clear that Stefan and his team had been playing around with the new toys and that Stefan Daniel believed in the possibility.

  Same procedure as last year, Miss Sophie?
  Same procedure as last year, Miss Sophie?
   

The people he carefully asked were mainly camera collectors, whom – as we all know – would probably prefer a remake of the Leica M3 over any new camera with a digital sensor!

I mention this to put the future possibilities into perspective. I think that Leica Camera AG internally believed in an electronic viewfinder in a Leica M 240, but also knows that 95% of the Leica M users would never allow such a radical change.

This is why the Leica M 240 came out with the glorified traditional rangefinder mechanism, as always. Just as in the 90th Year Birthday ... and then an add-on on top of a EVF-2 to test the waters.

I still meet people who haven't even considered buying a EVF-2 electronic viewfinder for their Leica M 240. That is how the alien the idea is to some hardcore Leica M users.

 

Robin. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPHERICAL F/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Robin. Leica M 240 with Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPHERICAL F/1.4 AA. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

My experience is that 70% or more of the Leica M 240 users really like the EVF-2 electronic viewfinder when they get it. Obviously, if the next Leica M is being offered in two models - one with only EVF and one with only RF, then the EVF model would likely sell a little more than the RF version. But many of us would want to get both of them.

But a Leica M with a combined viewfinder as the Fuji had, bridging the two possible models into one might just spare us all a long and tiresome discussion about what is better.

We will see, I guess ...

 

Paris Workshop. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Paris Workshop. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2014-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

I hope you enjoyed this article on focusing with the Leica EVF-2. As always, feel free to e-mail me at thorsten@overgaard.dk with suggestions, ideas, corrections and interesting stories and details. I will be finishing the last two pages on focusing the Leica M soon, but expect my Leica M-D 262 and Leica SL articles to come before that.

 

#1712-0816

 

     
  This article will continue on page 45 -->  
  Coming soon!  

 

Enjoy the latest articles on the Leica M 240:

This is a continious user-report by Thorsten Overgaard. See more articles here and make sure to join the mailing list to stay in the know.

     
Page 42 in the article series on the Leica M
Color photograhy and the Leica M
  Page 42 in the article series on the Leica M
Focusing the Leica M - Five pages about that...
     

 

 

Arteh Odjidja. Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.
Arteh Odjidja.
Leica M 240 with 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2013-2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 


 
 

 

 

 

Index of Thorsten von Overgaard's user review pages covering Leica M9, Leica M9-P, M-E, Leica M10,
Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom, M 246  as well as Leica Q and Leica SL:

Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M9-P   Links
Leica M10
V 1   3                                  
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44         What if?
Leica M-D 262 1 2                        
Leica Monochrom 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
A
29
B
29
C
29
D
               
Leica Q 1         Leica TL2: 1 2              
Leica SL 1 2 3 4 5                               Books
   
   

 

– Thorsten Overgaard

   


leica.overgaard.dk
Thorsten Overgaard's Leica Article Index
Leica M cameras:   Leica S:
Leica M10   Leica S1 digital scan camera
Leica M Type 240 and M-P Typ240   Leica S2 digital medium format
Leica M-D Typ 262 and Leica M60   Leica S digital medium format
Leica M Monochrom Typ246 digital rangefinder    
Leica M Monochrom MM digital rangefinder   Leica Cine Lenses:
Leica M9 and Leica M-E digital rangefinder   Leica Cine lenses from CW Sonderoptic
Leica M9-Professional digital rangefinder    
Leica M4 35mm film rangefinder    
Leica M lenses:   Leica SLR cameras:
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica SL 2015 Type 601 mirrorless fullframe
Leica 21mm Leica Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4   Leica R8/R9/DMR film & digital 35mm dSLR cameras
Leica 21mm Super-Angulon-M f/3.4   Leica R10 [cancelled]
Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica R4 35mm film SLR
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH FLE f/1.4 and f/1.4 AA   Leica R3 electronic 35mm film SLR
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leicaflex SL/SL mot 35mm film SLR
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95    
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0 and f/1.2   Leica R lenses:
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f//1.4   Leica 19mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 35mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leitz 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 "rigid" Series II   Leica 50mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4   Leica 60mm Macro-Elmarit f/2.8
Leica 75mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 80mm Summilux-F f/1.4
Leica 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 90mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 90mm Summarit-M f/2.5   Leica 180mm R lenses
Leica 90mm Elmarit f/2.8   Leica 400mm Telyt-R f/6.8
Leitz 90mm Thambar f/2.2   Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
    Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/4.0
     
History and overview:   Small Leica cameras:
Leica History   Leica Q full-frame mirrorless
Leica Definitions   Leica Digilux 2 vintage digital rangefinder
Leica Lens Compendium   Leica Digilux 1
Leica Camera Compendium   Leica X
The Solms factory and Leica Wetzlar Campus   Leica Sofort instant camera
    Leica Minilux 35mm film camera
    Leica CM 35mm film camera
     
Photography Knowledge   Thorsten Overgaard books and education:
Calibrating computer screen for photographers   Thorsten Overgaard Masterclasses & Workshops
Quality of Light   Overgaard Lightroom Survival Kit for Lightroom CC/6
Lightmeters   "Finding the Magic of Light" eBook (English)
Color meters for accurate colors (White Balance)   "Die Magie des Lichts Finden" eBook (German)
White Balance & WhiBal   "Composition in Photography" eBook
Film in Digital Age   "The Moment of Impact in Photography" eBook
Dodge and Burn   "Freedom of Photographic Expression" eBook
All You Need is Love    
How to shoot Rock'n'Roll   "After the Tsunami" Free eBook
X-Rite   The Overgaard New Inspiration Extension Course I
The Origin of Photography   The Overgaard Photography Extension Course
Case in Point    
The Good Stuff  
Hasselblad/Imacon Flextight 35mm and 6x6 scanner   "Magic of Light" Television Channel
Leica OSX folder icons   Thorsten von Overgaard YouTube Channel
   
Leica Photographers:  
Jan Grarup   Riccis Valladares
Henri Cartier-Bresson   Christopher Tribble
Birgit Krippner   Martin Munkácsi
John Botte   Jose Galhoz
 
Douglas Herr    
Vivian Maier  
Morten Albek    
Byron Prukston    
     
The Story Behind That Picture:   Thorsten Overgaard on Instagram
More than 100 articles by Thorsten Overgaard   Join the Thorsten Overgaard Mailing List
Thorsten Overgaard Workshop Schedule   Thorsten Overgaard on Twitter
    Thorsten Overgaard on Facebook
Leica Forums and Blogs:    
Leica M10 / M240 / M246 User Forum on Facebook   Heinz Richter's Leica Barnack Berek Blog
The Leica User Forum   Leica Camera AG
Steve Huff Photos (reviews)   Leica Fotopark
Erwin Puts (reviews)   The Leica Pool on Flickr
LeicaRumors.com (blog)   Eric Kim (blog)
Luminous Landscape (reviews)   Adam Marelli (blog)
Sean Reid Review (reviews)   Jono Slack
Ken Rockwell (reviews)   Shoot Tokyo (blog)
John Thawley (blog)   Ming Thein (blog)
  I-Shot-It photo competition
 
 
The Von Overgaard Gallery Store:    
Hardware for Photography   Von Overgaard Ventilated lens shades:
Software for Photography   Ventilated Shade for Current 35mm Summilux FLE
Signed Prints   Ventilated Shade for older Leica 35mm/1.4 lenses
Mega Size Signed Prints   Ventilated Shade for Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH
Mega Size Signed Limited Prints   Ventilated Shade E43 for older 50mm Summilux
Medium Size Signed Limited Prints   Ventilated Shade for 35mm Summicron-M ASPH
Small Size Signed Limited Prints   Ventilated Shade for older 35mm/f2 lenses
Commisioning Thorsten Overgaard Worldwide   Ventilated Shade for 50mm Summicron lenses
Thorsten Overgaard Archive Licencing   Ventilated Shade for Leica 28mm Summilux
Vintage Prints   Ventilated Shade for current 28mm Elmarti-M
Photography Books by Thorsten Overgaard   Ventilated Shade for older 28mm Elmarti-M
Home School Photography Extension Courses   Ventilated Shade for 75mm Summicron (coming)
Overgaard Workshops & Masterclasses   ventilated Shade E55 for 90mm Summicron
Artists Nights   Ventilated Shade for 28mm Summaron
    Ventilated Shade for 24mm Elmarit
Gallery Store Specials   Ventilated ShadeE60 for 50mm Noctilux and 75/1.4
 

 

Above: The Car. Leica M 240 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2016 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Leica logo

LEItz CAmera = LEICA
Founded 1849 in Wetzlar, Germany.

 

Feel free to join the
Leica M Type 240 User Group
on Facebook

 

Quick links:

How to install firmware update

Which memory card to get

Formatting memory cards

Latest Leica M Type 240 Firmware
update from Leica Camera AG

Camera Raw 7.4 Beta and later
(with support of Leica M 240)

 

Leica M9 & Leica ME firmware

 

 

Thorsten von Overgaard in Hong Kong by Jonathan Seah.
Thorsten von Overgaard
in Hong Kong by Jonathan Seah.

 

The photos on this page have been edited in Adobe Lightroom 3.6 and Lightroom 6.6, and few or none have been adjusted further in Photoshop. To read more about my workflow, visit the page of my "Lightroom Survival Kit"

.

 

 

Also visit:

Overgaard Photography Workshops
Von Overgaard Gallery Store
Von Overgaard Ventilated Shades
Thorsten Overgaard Books
Leica Definitions
Leica History
"Photographer For Sale"
Leica Lens Compendium
Leica Camera Compendium
Leica 21mm Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4

Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M f/2.0
Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4
Leica 90mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0
Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica Cine lenses from CW Sonderoptic
Leica Digilux 2

Leica M10
Leica M9, M9-P and Leica ME
Leica M 240
Leica M 240 Video
Leica M 262
Leica M-D 262
Leica M Monochrom
Leica M 246 Monochrom

Leica SL full-frame mirrorless
Leica R9 and R8 SLR with digital back
Leica Q
Leica TL2
Leica Sofort
Leica S digital medium format
Leica X
"On The Road With von Overgaard"
Light metering
White Balance for More Beauty
Color Meters

Screen Calibration
Which computer to get
Sync'ing photo archive to iPhone
Lightroom Survival Kit
The Story Behind That Picture

 

 

Overgaard Photo Workshops


 

 

 

 

 

 

Thorsten Overgaard
Thorsten von Overgaard is a Danish writer and photographer, specializing in portrait photography and documentary photography, known for writings about photography and as an educator. Some photos are available as signed editions via galleries or online. For specific photography needs, contact Thorsten Overgaard via e-mail.

Feel free to e-mail to thorsten@overgaard.dk for
advice, ideas or improvements.

 

 

 


 

 



     
     

Join a Thorsten Overgaard
Photography Workshop

I am in constant orbit teaching
Leica and photography workshops.

Most people prefer to explore a
new place when doing my workshop.
30% of my students are women.
35% of my students do
two or more workshops.
95% is Leica users.
Age range is from 16 to 83 years
with the majority in the 30-55 range.
Skill level range from two weeks
to a lifetime of experience.
97% use a digital camera.
100% of my workshop graduates photograph more after a workshop.
1 out of 600 of my students have
asked for a refund.

I would love to see you in one!
Click to see the calendar.

     
     

Hong Kong

 

New York

Shanghai

 

Boston

Beijing

 

Washington DC

Tokyo

 

Toronto

Kyoto

  Montreal

Taipei

  Québec
Seoul  

Seattle

Jakarta

 

San Francisco

Bali

 

Los Angeles

Manila

 

Las Vegas

Singapore

 

Santa Barbara

Kuala Lumpur

 

Santa Fe

Bangkok

 

Austin

Sydney

 

Clearwater

Perth

 

Miami

Melbourne

 

Cuba

Auckland

 

São Paulo

Napier

 

Rio de Janeiro

Moscow

 

Cape Town

Saint Petersburg

 

Tel Aviv

Oslo

 

Jaffa

Malmö

 

Istanbul

Stockholm

 

Palermo

Aarhus

 

Rome

Copenhagen

  Venice

Amsterdam

  Wetzlar

Frankfurt

  Mallorca

Berlin

  Madrid

Münich

 

Barcelona

Salzburg

 

Amsterdam

Vienna

 

Paris

Cannes  

London

Reykjavik   Portugal
    Milano
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

 






 

Photo seminars Berlin Copenhagen and Hong Kong

 

Photo seminars Berlin Copenhagen and Hong Kong

 

Photo seminars Berlin Copenhagen and Hong Kong

 
           
  · © Copyright 1996-2017 · Thorsten von Overgaard


 

© 1996 - 2017 Thorsten von Overgaard. All rights reserved

 

Web Analytics