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The Leica Q3 review and user report. Out and about in San Francisco with the Leica Q2 Monochrom. © Thorsten Overgaard.
   
 
   

Leica Q3 Review

By: Thorsten Overgaard. May 25, 2023. Last edit September 19, 2023.

 

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Leica Q3: The 60MP mirrorless camera

One of the most popular digital cameras of this decade now comes in a third-generation update. Known for its excellent design, simple operation, and high-quality image quality, it is the camera out there that best enables you to connect with the soul of digital photography.

 

Review: All you need to know about the Leica Q3. Features and new functions. By Thorsten Overgaard from the Leica Q3 review.

 

Happiness in Photography

To say that the Leica Q is like using an iPhone, but just the image quality is so much better – is true. But more to the point, having and using a Leica Q turns you from someone who captures things of interest into someone who makes photographs.

Frankly, a smartphone is not a bad choice if you just want to take photographs. So often when I have to explain photography in a simple way, I realize that some people would be better off with a smartphone. Because smartphone cameras are made to take photos without troubling you with settings. The problem is to elevate you from not being concerned about settings to knowing enough to handle a real camera that, in return, delivers top-notch quality images.


The Leica Q3.
The Leica Q3.

 

To be competent, you have to know how to do something in order to do it successfully. So, how can you teach someone to be competent?

The camera producers are not of any damn help in helping you understand how simple photography really is. They stuff cameras with buttons, wheels, words, and symbols you don't understand (I don't either, and I've been photographing for 40 years now).

Scratch all that. With the Leica Q3, photography became simple: top-notch image quality, a few of the necessary controls to control exposure (that a smartphone doesn't have), and all fitted with the best lenses in the world, wrapped in a now classic design.

 

In the streets with the Leica Q. © Thorsten Overgaard.
In the streets with the Leica Q. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

As a testimony to image quality and all, the Leica Q series is also the camera that 'serious photographers' buy because it's so damn irresistible: lightweight, compact, well-designed, and yet delivers image quality that is on par with almost any other camera out there. And when I say 'almost any other camera', I am talking about Hasselblad X1D, Sony A7, Leica SL, Leica M, and the rest of them.

In the recent year, I often pondered the question, "Which camera and lens make me happy?" because I have a closet full of cameras to choose from, and as time goes by, I have come to realize that they can all take sufficient high-quality images. So, it is not about the camera anymore. It is about me. And by being happy, I mean being put in a mood where I would always wear a camera, enthusiastically look for pictures, and be able to make my visions come true the instant I get the idea to take a picture of something.

Often the Leica Q is the answer because it is an easy companion, and it does what I tell it to do, and it does it quite well. On other days the Leica M with a 50mm lens is the answer. My philosophy is that any picture I take has to be a real picture. Taking a smartphone photo is a waste of opportunity because the quality can't withstand time. I make photos for the future.


The Leica Q3 or the Leica M11. © Thorsten Overgaard.
The Leica Q3 or the Leica M. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The Leica M makes me feel like a walking painter, where anything I touch or do becomes a real photograph with a glimpse of light as short as 1/125th of a second. But the Leica Q enables me to achieve the same results with an unobtrusive camera on the days I feel like going without a camera. I can be a dilettante, and yet when I see something, I can make a real photograph.

The right camera is the one you are happy to own, have with you, and which delivers the pictures you envisioned without obstructing your ideas or requiring you to memorize a 400-page manual.


Leica Q3 or Leica M11? Mr. Nicola Semprevivo in my Milano workshop with his Leica M. Leica M9 with Leica 50mm Notilux-M f/0.95. © Thorsten Overgaard. lHappiness
Mr. Nicola Semprevivo in my Milano workshop with his Leica M. Leica M9 with Leica 50mm Notilux-M f/0.95. © Thorsten Overgaard. lHappiness

 

 

         
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Straight out of the camera the Leica Q3 files are often "finished" and ready". © Thorsten Overgaard.
Straight out of the camera the Leica Q3 files are often "finished" and ready". © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

       
 

The Leica Q3 image quality

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

I will take my sweet time to evaluate the Leica Q3 image quality. As always, I work with a camera for a while, and I wait for the proper camera profiles to be available in Lightroom and Capture One Pro. I don't offer opinions before I have them.

The tweaks on how to make the Leica Q3 image files sing is in my Leica Q3 Know-All eBook, which also comes with Leica Q3 presets and styles for Lightroom and Capture One for both color and black and white. I have done the Leica Q Know-All eBook previously (2015) and the Leica Q2 Know-All eBook (2019), along with the video classes on all the Leica Q cameras, Leica M cameas and more.

 

Taking a walk in Paris. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Taking a walk in Paris. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Leica M11 review by Thorsten Overgaard: Leica M11 Mechanical vs Electronic Shutter"

 

       
 

The Leica Q3 sample photo test files

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

I made a small package with test photos from the Leica Q3. Send an email to me get alerte when ready.

Leica Q3 sample photo test files for free download: 

         
  FREE Leica Q3 DNG test files      
 

Will be availble here. If impatient, send an email to me get alerte when ready.

     

 

 

Photographer Thorsten Overgaard tell the story of the ventilated shade and why he designed his own for Leica and other brands to bring back classic style of the Leica Q3, Leica Summicron and more.
Photographer Thorsten Overgaard tell the story of the ventilated shade and why he designed his own for Leica and other brands to bring back classic style of the Leica Q3, Leica Summicron and more.

       
 

Leica Q3 with Flip Up Screen

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       
   
  Leica Q3 with Flip Up Screen
  Leica Q3 with Flip Up Screen

The main new feature of the Leica Q3 is that the camera now has a flip-up screen. Due to this addition, the camera's weight has increased by 20g, and the touch screen has slightly lower resolution compared to the Leica Q2 screen that is integrated into the camera.

Considering that many Leica Q users rely on the excellent Electronic ViewFinder (EVF) for composing and capturing photos, and use the screen for menu settings and photo review, I personally find it an odd choice to include a flip-up screen.

The flip screen is an invention that is nearly 30 years old. I recall having one of the first Nikon compact cameras with a flip screen that could rotate in all directions. It certainly offers new possibilities.

If one truly wanted to use a Leica Q at a low level or view the screen from the front of the camera, connecting a smartphone to a Leica Q2 via the Leica Photos App would serve the purpose. Besides using the phone as a remote control for capturing photos and previewing them, you can also control settings like ISO, shutter speed, aperture, etc. through the smartphone.

 

The Leia Q3, unlike previous models, now features a Flip Up Screen. © Thorsten Overgaard.
The Leia Q3, unlike previous models, now features a Flip Up Screen. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Photos like this taken from a low level in Paris can be achieved with a flip screen. It's not a bad idea, but in my opinion, not really necessary for the Leica Q3. But here we are, there it is! © Thorsten Overgaard.
Photos like this taken from a low level can be achieved with a flip screen. It's not a bad idea, but in my opinion, not really necessary for the Leica Q3. But here we are, there it is! © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Truth be told, the flip screen might be the one thing on the Leica Q3 that could entice fans to opt for a Leica Q2 with its 47MP resolution, enjoying the simplicity of design without concerning themselves much about the extra megapixels and improved ISO above 6400 ISO offered by the Leica Q3.

 

Leica Q3 with Flip Up Screen

Leica Q3: Disappointed

The Flip-Up Screen makes the design less decisive, and the introduction of a plastic frame on an otherwise all-metal camera body... I think things took a wrong turn here. You feel it, the luxurious feeling is gone, and the difficult opening of the screen doesn't make it easier to fall in love with it.

Next, some people will ask, "It would be better if it could swivel all the way to the side and around," and there we go. A great design molested.

This, I think, is the first impression of the Leica Q3, which in almost all other aspects, is a Leica Q2 with slightly improved numbers: 13MP larger files, 1-stop improved ISO, wireless charging possibilities, a series of accessories now available.

For the sake of photography, you have to make a choice. To get the newer Leica Q3 or to get a new or second-hand Leica Q2. I guess that in real life, after a few hours, any of them will work. Either suffer the pain of using a Leica Q2, knowing that there is a 'better and updated' model out there, or use the newest and most glorious model, knowing that there exists a better-designed model out there.

Then, of course, there is the image quality, which I shall return to. We mustn't forget that we get a camera to make images.

 

The addition of a Flip Up Screen on the Leica Q3 might be just what you always though that camera always needed - or it might be the reason you search for a Leica Q2 while new stock is still available.
The addition of a Flip Up Screen on the Leica Q3 might be just what you always though that camera always needed - or it might be the reason you search for a Leica Q2 while new stock is still available.

 

       
 

The Leica Q3 lens

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Can the Leica Q3 lens handle all the resolution?

In short, yes. The 28mm f/1.7 lens was designed in 2015 for the first Leica Q model. It was designed, like all newer Leica lenses, for the Leica M system and Leica SL system, with double the resolution of previously known lenses. While Leica lenses are known for their level of detail, they were originally made for film. When digital sensors were introduced to the Leica M system in 2006, new lenses were designed to handle the increased detail of digital sensors.

The 28mm lens on the Leica Q3 might very well be capable of performing well even on sensors with resolutions of 500MP and higher. As proof of its performance, consider the Leica Q2 Monochrom with its 47MP sensor, which allows for cropping an image to 10% while still maintaining impressive detail and sharpness. In fact, looking at a small crop you cant tell it is a crop.

One reason for this performance is the lens, while another is the fact that a monochrome sensor without a Bayer filter essentially has four times the resolution power. When a Bayer filter is applied to a sensor to enable color perception, it combines every four sensors into one (red, green, blue, and white). Consequently, the Leica Q2 Monochrom serves as evidence of how the lens would perform on a 200MP sensor. It is quite apparent that the lens can handle that level of resolution and more.

Take a look at this Leica Q2 photo I captured when it was first released, as well as the crop of it. Not only is the text incredibly crisp, but also observe the three-dimensional feel and level of detail, demonstrating that it is genuine resolution and not artificially enhanced edges that account for the fine details. This lens truly captures every detail.


100% photo Leica Q3.
100% photo.


Leica Q3 sharpness detail of resolution.
A crop of the same photo.

 

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Leica Q3 with digital crop

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

Leica Q3: 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 75mm and 90mm in one and the same lens

One of the features in the Leica Q3 is the digital crop to 90mm. It means that you press the function button on the back of the camera, and then you see a 35mm crop. Press again, and you now see a 50mm crop of the frame. Press again, and you see a 75mm crop. Press again, and you see a 90mm crop. Press once more, and it cycles back to the full 28mm frame.

"Digital crop" in the Leica Q3 means that you simply crop the 60MP file. This is something you can do on the computer as well, but since the first Leica Q (2015), Leica has introduced the idea that you don't need several lenses. One excellent 28mm lens is enough because, with a high-resolution sensor, you can crop the image quite tightly and small, and it still looks like a full-resolution photograph.

Not an easy sell to people nowadays who seem to insist that when they buy a 60MP camera, they want a 60MP file. Personally, I am convinced you don't need 60MP. I have made great photos with 5MP cameras that look like medium format photos.

 

Digital crop is a good idea if you can get used to it and think with it. In the Leica Q3, a 28mm high-quality image can be cropped in-camera to 35mm, 50mm, 75mm or 90mm. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Digital crop is a good idea if you can get used to it and think with it. In the Leica Q3, a 28mm high-quality image can be cropped in-camera to 35mm, 50mm, 75mm or 90mm. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Never mind. It is there, and the way it works is that you see a frame line inside the viewfinder that indicates the frame of, for example, 90mm. Then you can compose the photo as a 90mm photo. Not easy to do, but with some use, you might be able to.

Once you import the image to Lightroom or Capture One, you will see only the 90mm image. But when you hit the Crop tool, you will see that all 60MP is there as a 28mm frame. It just has the 90mm crop implemented.

If you start working with this tool, you will see that it is a brilliant idea. And it is even more brilliant in that you can move or change the 90mm crop. You have a large 28mm frame to work within.

I am glad that Leica insists on implementing this in the Leica Q3 because, in the Leica Q3, it makes sense. The lens is so excellent that from the very beginning, it was designed to over-perform and thus make a 90mm crop possible once the sensor resolution was available. Which it is in the Leica Q3.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Delany joined the Overgaard Leica Q Workshop. They both use Leica Q2, the husband a color version and the wife a Leica Q2 Monochrom version. But most importantly, they do photography together. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Mr. and Mrs. Delany joined the Overgaard Leica Q Workshop. They both use Leica Q2, the husband a color version and the wife a Leica Q2 Monochrom version. But most importantly, they do photography together. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

     
  Leica Presets for Adobe Lightroom by Thorsten Overgaard  
         
 

I have made a few essential Presets for Lightroom that does minor adjustments to the Leica files, so as to get the tones the exact way I want. To get the "Leica look", rather than a “digital sensor look”.

     
  Free today when you use the code:
"LEICAOVERGAARD"
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"Overgaard Leica Presets"

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$48.00

Instant delivery.

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  Item #1818-0818      

 

       
 

Leica Q3 design philosophy

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

A classic design is born

The Leica Q (2015) was designed by Vincent Laine who had made his own ideas of future Leica designs back home in Sweden. This led to him becoming first an intern with Leica in Wetzlar, Germany, and then an employee. One of his projects was to design the Leica Q.

Leica Q designer Vincent Laine with the first Leica Q. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Leica Q designer Vincent Laine with the first Leica Q. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

It is safe to say that modern simplicity met with the classic simplicity of the Leica that was founded back in 1925 when Oskar Barnack wanted a small portable camera of high quality optics and mechanical engineering.

The first Leica Q was so perfect, also thanks to the product manager and the lens designers, that the only thing to improve in the next generation, the Leica Q2, was the optical viewfinder and the diopter. The rest was unchanged.

A lot of the Leica Q design is round, and if you visit the Leica factory in Wetzlar, you will see a round globe in front of it, and eventually you will see the round optical elements being mounted into Leica lenses.

But then, you can get a lot of things done with a straight line, and both the Leica headquarter and the Leica cameras have a lot of straight lines. The Leica SL series has a lot of straightness to it.

 

The Leica headquarter in Wetlar, Germany. © Thorsten Overgaard.The Leica headquarter in Wetlar, Germany. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The first Leica Q even had round buttons on the back, in the Leica Q2 it was simplified to three square buttons and a round joystick. In the Leica Q3 it has been reduced further to two square buttons and a round joystick.

 

The Leica Q with the Sony RX1.
The Leica Q (2015) next to a Sony RX1.

 

Classic design from 1958, when Braun's designer Dieter Rams changed the way product design was done.
Classic design from 1958, when Braun's designer Dieter Rams changed the way product design was done.

 

You may think of the Leica optical designs and the brand value what you want. But let's just indulge in this moment where someone made a real product with a long-lasting design that makes the product useful and understandable, aesthetic, simple, and with every detail though to be as simple as possible.

That's all.

 

Here the Leica Q acessories designed by Thorsten Overgaard for "Always Wear A Camera": The The Von Camera Pouch, equipped with a Yosemite camera strap and a ventilated shade.
Here the Leica Q acessories designed by Thorsten Overgaard for "Always Wear A Camera": The The Von Camera Pouch, equipped with a Yosemite camera strap and a ventilated shade.

 

       
 

How to do video with the Leica Q3: Now with 8K video

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Though, the Leica Q (model 116) of June 2015 was born with 4K video, Leica Camera AG decided not to put it into use due to battery and heat considerations. In the Leica Q2 we got full 4K video, and now in the Leica Q3 we now have 8K video. As well as ports for external screen and microphones (USB-C and Mini HDMI).

 

Architect Irwin Miller of Los Angeles makes video short stories like the above with the Leica Q that he quickly edits in Final Cut Pro the same evening and then share with friends and family via text messages.

 

How to make sense of doing video with the Leica Q3

Doing video on a camera with auto-focus is never easy, and then there is the sound that comes from the two built-in stereo microphones on top of the camera. All in all this easily results in video recordings where the auto-focus changes when it's not supposed to, and sound is either very 'thin' or the users brething and handling of the camera is very prominent in the recording.

The problem with video is that you soon want a large external screen to work with focus and all on, and external microphones to ensure proper sound. Now available on the Leica Q3 (an not Leica Q2 or Leica Q). And while "auto-focus" sounds comforting, the fact is that professional video and cinema movies are done with manual focus. Professional film set usually have one person monitoring the sound and another monitoring the focus while the camera operator manages the camera. Smaller set-ups such as television news, the camera man does it all while wearing headphones to make sure the sound is working during the entire interview of filming.

The settings to make Video work on the Leica Q3 (and Leica Q2 and Leica Q):

To do video on the Leica Q3, the AF has to be turned on, and the 1-Point AF set to AFs (single point).

If you set the AF to Continuous (AFc), the Leica Q3 will keep wobbling in focus trying to find new focus all the time.

You may also use Manual Focus and adjust focus as you move on; whenever you turn the focus ring, you see focus peaking in the viewfinder so you can focus accurately (the video continues to record full-frame).

You can also set the camera on a tripod or table and manual focus, to do an interview for example. Or use the Leica Fotos App as described further down.

The Optical Image Stabilization of the Leica Q3 should only be used for video, not for stills.

While video is a great thing, these possibilities and limitations give and idea how it could be used. Recording bits and pieces and add a soundtrack later is a good idea because you can fundamentally make a professional video then (wihout sound issues and AF changing to the wrong place, as int he video above).

Putting the Leica Q3 on a tripod and using the Leica Fotos App to film a subject that is not moving is also well working. I could do all my Magic of Light Photography Television videos that way, except I use a Leica SL with a Leica 35mm Summilux-TL f/1.4, and with wireless microphones connected to the camera's mini-HDMI plug.

The most ideal Leica for video is without doubt the Leica SL2-S which has a great 24MP sensor that jsut works excellent with Leica SL and Leica S lenses (and Leitz Cine lenses).

 

Thorsten Overgaard in Milano writing this article. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Thorsten Overgaard in Milano writing this article. Leica M11. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

       
 

Editing Leica Q3 photos on the iPhone and iPad

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       
  More resources:    
  Lightroom Survival Kit by Thorsten Overgaard
Capture One Survival Kit by Thorsten Overgaard
   
       

Thorsten Overgaard: "Everything has to go somewhere"

The DNG raw files from the Leica Q3, when imported into Lightroom or Capture One, are remarkably close to the final images, more so than other cameras and previous Leica models.

For years, it has been a valid perspective that to achieve optimal image quality, one should capture in raw or DNG format and then edit the files in post-processing software like Adobe Lightroom or Capture One.

     
 

Definitions: A "raw" file simply means raw; it contains the complete sensor data captured for an image. On the other hand, "DNG" stands for Digital Negative, which is essentially the same raw data but includes all subsequent editing data. In the case of a "raw" format file, there is usually a separate "sidecar" file that contains the editing data, resulting in the management of two files for each image. It is worth noting that Leica cameras exclusively utilize the DNG format.

Both "raw" and "DNG" images necessitate a process of "translation" from raw data into a JPG file in order to be printed, shown on a screen, shared, etc.

 
     

However, in recent years, I feel there has been a need to simplify these editing workflows. It can be tedious work, and with each new software edition, options and complications seem to multiply. In short, as file sizes increase and editing tools "evolve," the process of editing images becomes more and more frustrating.

From a photography standpoint, our goals are simple: 1) to see a picture, 2) to capture the picture as envisioned, 3) to be able to print, share, or sell that picture ... and I might add, 4) to manage and store the picture so it's readily available for use, and secured for the future.

In the current photography workflow, there is a significant step 2.5) involving importing, selecting, and editing the pictures. And, if I may add a touch of humor and sarcasm, a step 2.6) has been introduced by Adobe and others who build a new business model by holding files hostage in their cloud and software, leaving users with limited choices but to stay with that software and pay a monthly subscription to access their own photos.

Since 2009, I have been authoring, updating, refining, and simplifying my unique workflow in the Lightroom Survival Kit and the Capture One Survival Kit. These guides aim to help photographers survive the editing process: how to organize their ever-growing archive of photographs for easy retrieval, how to preserve them, and how to streamline the editing process to achieve optimum quality with minimal effort and frustration.

Personally, my dream and current efforts is to simplify workflow even more. Look at my Overgaard Styles and Presets page for tools to edit Leica Q3 files in Capture One and Adobe Lightroom with close to 'one-click' editing.

There is however another route, now outlayed in the Leica Q3, which is to simply photograph in JPG format and be done. The recent years introduction of Leica Photos App and the possibility of wirelessly transfering photos to a phone or iPad for instant gratification and sharing (now 10x faster transfer rates introduced with the Leica Q3). Leica are adding new looks available from the Leica Fotos App to download to the Leica Q3, which gives more possible looks.

This opens up for the possibility to 1) see the photo, 2) capture it as envisioned, 2.5) share it instantly, and then you have to 3) to manage and store the picture so it's readily available for use, and secured for the future so as to 4) be able to use it in the future for sharing, print, picture sales, etc.

With the possibility to instantly transfer and share a photo, you will experience the odd feeling of living in a parallel reality when you import your photos to the computer and editing software; which is that you already finished and posted a photo on Instagram, but here it is again, and now you have to edit it! If not managed properly, it can be a mess of unfinished work, becasue you got the instant gratification, but you didn't "make a final photo" that is in an archive.

There are ways to do this, and I will once again refer to my Lightroom Survival Kit and the Capture One Survival Kit which deals with oranizing and finishing things and remove compliations and onfusions.

The most recent 4.0 update of the Leica Photos App (with the release of the Leica Q3 in May 2023) offer the possibility to connect the app with "Adobe Lightroom Photo & Video Editor App" or "Darkroom App" on the smartphone for further editing of a image file tranfered from the Leica Q3 (or any other Leica camera). A quick way to edit a photo into a final photo; but also a route into a mess of having your files kidnapped by cloud software. Nothing wrong with it, really, except if you are so naive that you believe the cloud software is made to preserve your photos (it is not; it is made to keep you subscribing to a closed circuit. Darkroom is another editing software based on cloud synchronizing, and as such it rely heavily on Apple iCloud and thus your photos easily get caught in Apple's rather sticky cloud (actually, not only is it sticky to get photos out of it, it is is also confusing where the photos actually ara). Once again; read and use my Survival Kit and have a workflow where you control and own your images, and they are preserved safely for the future –  even if you edit them on an iPhone, or not at all).

 

Leica Q3: What to do with image style settings?

The safe route would simply be to set the Leica Q3 to capturing DNG + JPG in the highest resolution, and then use the possibility to set the JPG format to Monochrom or any other final look you fancy (including the new "Leica Looks" you can download to the Leica Q3 from the Leica Fotos App). When importing the photo to Lightroom or Capture One on the computer, you have both the "final" JPG file, as well as the raw DNG file that contain more editing possibilities.

You may find that in many cases, the JPG has the look you wanted, and so you are done. In other instances, you want to improve and touch up an image, and sometimes this can even be done to satisfaction on the JPG file. If you want to dig deeper and optimize more, the DNG file is right there and available for this. DNG allow for extensive adjustments in exposure, shadow details, color balance and more.

 

An enthusiast capturing a photo in New York. © Thorsten Overgaard.
An enthusiast capturing a photo in New York. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

A note on "real photographers"

There are no real photographers, only real pictures. Should you ever stumble upon anyone who questions if you are a "real photographer," I believe you can ignore it. Nobody ever asks to see your papers to determine if you've had five years of schooling to become a photographer. All people do is look at a photograph, and based on how much they like or admire it, they judge the photographer's skills. This may be disheartening for those who spent five years in school to learn photography, thinking it would grant them exclusive rights to take photographs. The reality of the world is that the majority of the population has a camera, so anyone has the potential to take a real photograph, with or without a certificate from attending a single class that supposedly teaches them how to.

In terms of cameras and file types, it's the same. I have a mantra that I often say: "If it looks good, it is." I often refer to this when editing a photo because sometimes people can't decide on one of their photos and ask me about the rule. My answer is that the rule is if it looks good, it is good enough. Nobody walks into a gallery and asks if a photo on the wall was captured as DNG or JPG, or if the photographer has documentation proving they underwent a proper five-year education to take it. In fact, we don't even judge photos based on their sharpness.

Most photos are liked simply because we like them. The technical aspects such as the lens, camera brand, file type, sensor size, or film type used are rarely taken into consideration. The same applies to the images we see in magazines or photo books.

It's all about the photo, which, in this context, means doing what you like to do. Shoot JPG and be done, or shoot raw DNG and edit it to excellence. Whichever route leads you to final photographs that you are happy with is the right route.

"This is the way," as they say in Mandalorian.

 

Inside a New York diner. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Inside a New York diner. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

       
 

The Leica Q3 wireless charging

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

The Leica Q3 can be wirelessly charged if you use the Leica Q3 Wireless Charging Handgrip ($195.00).

A less expensive charging station is the $80.00 NATIVE UNION Drop XL, which I think is in fact the original $175.00 Leica XL Wireless Charger version that Leica used with their brand.


The Leica Q3 with handgrib and on the wireless charger.
The Leica Q3 with handgrib and on the wireless charger.

 

       
 

Vlogging with the Leica Q3

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       
  More resources:    
  Leica Fotos App for iPad and iPhone    
       

 

Video with a Leica Q3 or Leica SL2-S: Here I'm setting the focus point to my face and can then press record and put the iPhone down as a monitor so I can see what the camera records while I am talking. I can also adjust ISO, shutter speed and aperture on the iPhone screen.
Video with a Leica Q3 or Leica SL2-S: Here I'm setting the focus point to my face and can then press record and put the iPhone down as a monitor so I can see what the camera records while I am talking. I can also adjust ISO, shutter speed and aperture on the iPhone screen.


The Leica Photos App is another way to make video with Leica Q3 as the app offers that you can remote control the video of the Leica Q3. This is great for using an iPad or smartphone as monitor. You set the focus point on the smartphone, then press record and can see what the camera records as it does so.

The problem with video for vlogging (blogging with short videos) and other similar where you film yourself, is to see what is happening, make sure the focus stays on the face, and to control the camera. With the Leica Q3 and the Leica Photos App is is very simple: You got a monitor and remote control in one.

 

Ventilated shade from Always Wear A Camera and strap from Rock'n Roll Straps. Photo by Arnt Eriksen.
Ventilated shade from Always Wear A Camera and strap from Rock'n Roll Straps. Photo by Arnt Eriksen.

 

       
 

When is the Leica Q4 coming?

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Leica Q4 release date?

How did I know you would be asking that? Judging from the Leica Q (June 10, 2015) to Leica Q2 (March 7, 2019) and the Leica Q3 (May 25, 2023), the Leica Q4 could be out around spring of 2027.

Before then there will be a Leica Q3 Monochrom, and likely a "downgraded" entry version of the Leica Q3 under the name Leica Q3-P or Leica Q3-S.

 

       
 

When is the Leica Q3-S coming?

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

The perfect camerea, so maybe it continues as Leica Q3-S..?

Rumor has it that Leica will make a Leica Q3-S model some time after the Leica Q3 release, which fundamentally will be a Leica Q3 with the main features of the successful Leica Q2. This means a Leica Q3 with 47MP sensor, no flip screen, and only minor changes from the Leica Q2 (if any). First they will let the market indulge in the new Leica Q3, and then the Leica Q3-S will be introduced as a less expensive alternative 10-12 months later (but also an alternative for those who dislike the flip screen).

In the Leica SL range, the Leica SL2-S (2020) is a Leica SL2 (2019) model with the simpler menu of the SL2 (2019) and the more rounded body of the Leica SL2, but with the 24 MP sensor of the Leica SL which is very good for video (instead of the 47MP sensor of the Leica SL2).

In the Leica M range, the Leica M262 (2015) was a "downscale" of the Leica M240 (2014) in that it looked like the previous Leica, but used the same new sensor and back screen as the Leica M240.

One step forward, as you can see, but then one step back to offer an alternative that was and is good enough.

Also, the Leica Q2 Monochrom (2019) will continue for a while after the release of the Leica Q3 until a Leica Q3 Monochrom will be introduced (likely in 2024-2025).

 

Layla in Miami with the Leica Q2 Monochrom
Layla in Miami with the Leica Q2 Monochrom.

 

       
 

Manual focusing with the Leica Q3

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Auto Focus and Manual focus in the Leica Q3

Thankfully the Leica Q3 feature also the possibility to focus manually. This is a big thing as it actually works really well, and about 30% of Leica Q users do use manual focusing rather than Auto Focusing.

When you go to manual focusing, the EVF will automatically zoom in once you turn the focusing ring on the lens, and this way you can make yoru forusing very precise.

This, along with the built-in MACRO feature of the 28mm Summilux lens is what makes the Leica Q3 loveable. In my workshops, about 50% of the Leica Q users use manual focus. Leica Camera say it is 30% of the Leica Q users that use manual focus (based on the statistics from the Leica Photos App). It's a high number compared with any other modern camera, and it indicates how great the Leica Q3 is also for manual focusing.


Garcia in Havana, Cuba with the Leica Q2. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Garcia in Havana, Cuba with the Leica. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

       
 

Leica Q3 is a Full-Frame mirrorless camera

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Leica Q3 is true 24 x 36mm photography
(also known as 'full-frame')

All the Leica Q models are full-frame, so no news in that. But important in a day and age where many compact cameras only have smaller sensors (a format which Leica ditched in 2022 putting the Leica CL (2017) on the shelf).

What does "full-frame" mean? Well, it means that the format of the sensor is 24x36mm, which is the traditional film format since Leica made the first Leica in 1925, and which since has been the standard for all "35mm film cameras" (a film roll is 35mm high and contains 36 picture frames of each 24x36mm).

This is important, because the larger the sensor, the more you get the artistic look of "depth of field", meaning that you focus on a person in the foreground and the background is blurred. This cannot be done with small sensors, so that is what you are missing out on with a smartphone or a digital camera with an APS-C sensor (16.7 x 25.1 mm).

In that sense the Leica Q3 is a "real camera", and this is why I can use it for anything and still produce professional photographs.


Brad in New York with the Leica. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Brad in New York with the Leica. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

       
 

Leica Q3: The Art of the 28mm Lens

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Most prefer a 35mm or a 50mm lens as their standard lens. Very few have 28mm, 75mm or 90mm as their standard lens. With standard lens, I mean the one that you use 95% of the time, which is what most people do. You see people collect lenses, but most of us use one lens 95% of the time.

For me, my standard lens is 50mm. I can do anything I want to do with a 50mm lens. It's only because I easily fall in love with nice optics that I occasionally get other lenses. I still use 50mm most the time no matter what other lenses I got.

 

Leica M10 with Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Leica M10 with Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

But the Leica Q3 is born with a 28mm lens. If you use your iPhone for photography, you are actually using a 29mm lens. So you already know how to!

Composition is storytelling. What must be in the frame, and what should be omitted is the whole art on how to tell the story you want to tell. Obviously, the wider a focal length, the more there is to control. Buildings, trees, cars, posters, signs, people and all must be put into the frame and placed so they support the story and doesn't distract from the message. Composition means to put things together.

It's much easier to focus the message and story in with a 50mm or 90mm lens and blur out the background. Unless you have a wider story to tell. I've used 21mm quite a bit over the years.

It's demanding but fun to work with wide angle.

 

The Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt visits a school class. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2014-2019 Thorsten Overgaard.
The Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt visiting a school class. Isolating the subect without loosing the background and context. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The 28mm is a focal length I have been curious about and wanted to work with for a while. I got the Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. With the Leica Q3 you get 'the same lens' for a fraction of the price, because the Leica Q3 with the 28mm Summilux cost less than the Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4 alone.

When you go wide angle, you have to get closer to tell a story. If you "stay at 50mm range", most people in the photo will be supporting characters with no main subject. When you go closer to a main subject, you tell a story and have the wide background to support to your story and tell more or add an atmosphere.

One of the inspirations I have to use the 28mm is The World Press winner 2008 by Anthony Suau who used a Leica M6 TTL and 28mm a lot. He is one of the few people I know of that have had 28mm as his standard lens.

 


The World Press Photo Award winner 2008 that was taken with by Anthony Suau with a Leica M6 TTL and 28mm. It is a really strong image when you know the context. As an image itself it raises more questions than it answers. But in the World Press Photo context, and as a news photo, hands down one of the best photos I have seen, considering the year 2008 and the story behind:
"The picture shows an armed officer of the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department moving through a home in Cleveland, Ohio, following eviction as a result of mortgage foreclosure. Officers have to ensure that the house is clear of weapons and that the residents have moved out."

 

  Anthony Suau with his 28mm Summicron-M f/2.0. 
© Thorsten Overgaard.
  Anthony Suau with his 28mm Summicron-M f/2.0.
© Thorsten Overgaard.
   

If you look up his other photos, you will see a lot of 28mm composition and storytelling that I admire and would like to do. It's not easy I think, but that's why it would be fun to work with.

If Leica Camera AG would have followed tradition, they would have added a 35mm f/2.0 lens which which is the most sold and used focal length on Leica cameras throughout all time. I think the 28mm is a result of size of the lens (a 35/1.7 would have been larger) as well as the fact that Leica have very good design traditions for 28mm lenses (see later).

 

 

Leica Q3: The ideal
street photography camera?

I think many will see the Leica Q3 as a great street photography camera. It's discrete, doesn't say a sound, it has amazing fast auto focus and it's a complete package.

Street photography is a term I seldom use because the idea of what street photography is, is very different from person to person. Some think it has to be provocative and in your face and/or document the human condition (as in rich and poor, homeless, etc).

Provokative is not my style because I want people to not notice me (and provokative is to call for a reaction).

I remember I was once talking to a person on the phone about "taking a walk around the block" which is an advice for getting ready for a good nights sleep. So you take a walk around the block which first clears your mind and makes your fresh, then make you calm down so you can sleep. This persons problem was that he didn't have any "block" in the small town he lived in!

I am reminded of that when we talk street photography, because what is a street? Does it have to be a New York street, or could a roadside out in New Zealand with sheeps saying hello and an occasional car passing by do?

My view on street photography is that it is carrying a camera with you when you are outside. And inside as well for that matter. I get lots of great photos when I am not photographing but hanging out with a cup of coffee in a cafe.

If you live in Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia, most people are inside in malls and walk in air-conditioned walking streets or tunnels. So is a mall within the definition of a "street"?

 

A countryside street in Bangladesh. Leica M240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.
A countryside street in Bangladesh. Leica M 240 with Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

That's why I generally don't use the term street photography. Because some people think there is rules to obey.

To me, street photography is everything that happens in front of the camera that wasn't planned or set up. It became a photograph because you happened to be there and was ready with your camera.

Elliottt Erwitt and Henri Cartier-Bresson are good examples of photographers who carried their camera with them and caught life in each their way. Elliott has a lot of dogs and humor in his photos. Henri has a lot of rhythm, timing and aestethic in his. They were both great photographers in the street. Richard Avedon worked more in the studio, and when he worked in the street, he set it up as a studio.

It's the photos that matters, and when you get the photo, nobody should care if you did it one way or the other, or followed the "rules".

In that sense, the Leica Q3 is a great street photography camera. Because you can carry it with you at all times, and nobody will notice it. It's a camera made for having with you when you are out and about shopping with the famiy, on holiday or at work.

At the same time you have the convenience of having a wide angle lens at hand when you need it.

 

My photograph from inside the "Your Rainbow Panorama" sculpture by Olafur Eliasson on top of the ARoS International Art Museum in Aarhus, Denmark (it's actually a big ring added on top of the building that one can walk inside; and the glass walls change in the colors of the rainbow as you walk through).  Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.
My photograph from inside the "Your Rainbow Panorama" sculpture by Olafur Eliasson on top of the ARoS International Art Museum in Aarhus, Denmark (it's actually a big ring added on top of the building that one can walk inside; and the glass walls change in the colors of the rainbow as you walk through).  Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4. © 2015 Thorsten Overgaard.
Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles. Leica M 240 with Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

A Leica Q3 with 50mm or 35mm lens?

Not likely to happen anytime soon. As you see fro the above and from the popularity of the Leica Q series, the 28mm Summilux lens is a winner.

The Leica Q series is also a winnder in that it makes you want a Leica M or Leica SL. So Leica should be careful not to mess with this format.

Then again. I do think the long "rumored" 50mm Leica Q and 35mm Leica Q will come ... one day, but it will be as additional models. The origianl 28mm lens on the Leica Q is the one that made it a success and will not change on the main model.

 

At the juice bar with the Leica Q2 Monochrom. Leica M11 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © Thorsetn Overgaard.
At the juice bar with the Leica Q2 Monochrom. Leica M11 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © Thorsetn Overgaard.

 


Leica Q3 Ventilated Shade by Thorsten Overgaard

Since the Leica Q (2015) was released, I have made my own designed Leica Q3 ventilated shade with a "flower" shape. The shade protects the camera and lens from bumping into things, and more importantly, it shade for, and eliminates stray light from entering the lens from the side and causing a slight halation on the image. The larger aperture of the lens, the more important it is to use a lens shade.

That the shade is "ventilated" means there is vents so the shade doesn't obstruct the view from the viewfinder. As the Leica Q3 has electronic viewfinder, this has not meaning. It is purely an aesthetics look that give reference back to classic Leica lenses and their always wentilated shades.

Ventilated shades are also sometimes called "lens hoods", or in older days, "sunshade" (from German "Sonnenschirm").

Ventilated Shade for the Leica Q3, designed by Thorsten Overgaard. Ventilated shades exist for most Leica lenses and can be acquired from Always Wear A Camera..Ventilated Shade for the Leica Q3, designed by Thorsten Overgaard. Ventilated shades exist for most Leica lenses and can be acquired from Always Wear A Camera..

 

       
 

Leica Q3: f/1.7 or Automatic Aperture..?

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

I start out with the aperture set to f/1.7 on the Leica Q3 because I generally shoot all my lenses wide open, hoping to achieve a somewhat artistic look with the depth of field (DOF).

I love a narrow depth of field, even though there isn't as much of it with a wide lens compared to my usual lens, a 50mm. If you share the same preference, you may want to reconsider whether shooting wide open is actually a great strategy, especially on a camera with a 28mm lens where most things could be in focus at f/5.6.

However, if you want everything in focus, then you should set the lens to, for example, f/2.8 or f/5.6.

  The aperture on the Leica Q3 can be set to A, which is Automatic Aperture.
  The aperture on the Leica Q3 can be set to A, which is Automatic Aperture.
   

You can also go Automatic Apterture (setting the aperture ring to A on the camera), and then the camera will decide what aperture should be used, not based on the look, but to control the exposure of light.

It's up to you, but I would recommend setting the lens to an aperture you find pleasing. You may then set the camera to Auto ISO as the exposure backup control, because Auto ISO will not really change the artistic look, only enable the camera to take pictures in darker places (where a locked ISO would result in motion-blurred pictures because a low ISO forces the exposure time to be slow in order to get the right exposure).

 

 

       
 

Leica Q3: Understanding the Dept of Field scale

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

Understanding the Depth of Field scale on the Leica Q3 lens

  The markings on this 28mm lens indicate the depth of field (DOF). In this case, the focus is set to infinity, and if the lens is stopped down to f/1.6, objects from 1.8 meters to infinity will be acceptably sharp.
  The markings on the 28mm lens indicate the depth of field (DOF). In this case, the focus is set to infinity, and if the lens is stopped down to f/16, objects from 1.8 meters to infinity will be acceptably sharp.
   

All older lenses have a depth of field (DOF) scale, and most Leica lenses, including those on compact Leica cameras, have one as well. The Leica Q3 is no exception and features a well-designed DOF scale. However, many modern lenses, even expensive ones, no longer display a DOF scale.

When people see your pictures, they will often recognize the depth of field and ask how you managed to achieve the out-of-focus background and foreground objects. They may even inquire, 'How can I achieve that?'

To achieve such an effect, you need a lens that can be opened up wide, such as staying wide open at f/1.7 in the case of the Leica Q3.

Since a wide-open lens has a very narrow depth of focus, it also requires careful and accurate focusing. However, when done correctly, the results are remarkable.

On the other hand, if you wish to have more things in focus, you look at the DOF scale on top of the lens to determine the range of focus you need, and thus the f-stop necessary to have all that you want in focus.

 

What is Depth of Field? In this photo, the focus is on the flowers and the photograph on the desk, while the foreground and background are blurred due to the narrow depth of field. If you stop down the aperture of the lens from f/1.7 to f/5.6, more elements will come into focus. If you further stop down the lens to f/11, even more will be in focus. Another rule to remember is that the closer you get to a subject (reducing the focusing range), the narrower the depth of field becomes. © Thorsten Overgaard.
What is Depth of Field? In this photo, the focus is on the flowers and the photograph on the desk, while the foreground and background are blurred due to the narrow depth of field. If you stop down the aperture of the lens from f/1.7 to f/5.6, more elements will come into focus. If you further stop down the lens to f/11, even more will be in focus. Another rule to remember is that the closer you get to a subject (reducing the focusing range), the narrower the depth of field becomes. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

What Depth of Field can do for your images

DOF = Depth oField (or Depth oFocus, and sometimes Dept of Sharpness), an expression for how deep the focus is, or (more often use to express) how narrow the area of focus is. This is how much of the image, measured in depth or distance, will be in focus or "acceptable sharp". 

The appearance of the Depth of Focus is determined by: 

1) Aperture (the smaller the aperture opening, the greater the depth of field, and conversely, the wider the lens is open, the narrower the depth of field will be) and

2) The distance to the subject affects the depth of field. The further away the subject is, the larger the area that will be in focus. Conversely, the closer the subject is, the narrower the depth of field becomes. I frequently utilize this technique when photographing subjects, such as capturing a person at a distance of 1.5 meters with a distant background. This creates an illusion of a much narrower depth of field than what actually exists: the relatively close focusing distance reduces the amount of the scene in focus, while the distant background appears more blurred than if it were closer. Hence, I often use a 50mm lense, and even when using a 50mm f/2.0 lens, people sometimes mistake it for an f/0.95 lens due to the pronounced depth of field effect simply created by having the background far away.

 

Portrait with "extreme depth of field" by pushing background back and foreground people closer to the camera. As they say on the mirrors on cars, "Objects in mirror are closer than they appear". © Thorsten Overgaard.
Portrait with "extreme depth of field" by pushing background back and foreground people closer to the camera. As they say on the mirrors on cars, "Objects in mirror are closer than they appear". © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

"Go close, and push the background far away"

As the Leica Q3 is equipped with a wide-angle 28mm lens, achieving the desired selective focus and blurred foreground and background can be challenging at times. Wide-angle lenses tend to have the characteristic of rendering everything in focus, which can be appealing in certain situations. However, when aiming for a dreamy, artistic look with a very narrow depth of field, some effort is required. The most effective approach is to move in close to the subject while selecting backgrounds that offer a wide open space or a long street behind the subject.

In its simplicity, it can be illustrated by this example of a glass of water captured at a close distance of 70cm, with a city square in the background providing a significant distance to the building on the other side of the city square:

 

'A glass of water in Paris'. © Thorsten Overgaard.
"A glass of water in Paris". © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The DOF scale measurement on top of Leica lenses shows lines for each f-stop that indicate the range of distances within which the image will be sharp. The term 'shallow DOF' is commonly used in photography and refers to lenses with a very narrow focus tolerance, such as f/1.7, f/1.4, and f/0.95 lenses. These lenses can be used for selective focus, blurring irrelevant subjects in the foreground and background, so that only the essential subjects are in focus and catch the viewer's eye.

 

Depth Of Field scale from Fujifilm, same lens with different aperture settings from f/2.0 to f/8.0.
Depth of field illustrated by Fujifilm.
Same lens, at different f-stops.

 

         
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The Leica Q3 Macro scale for Depth of Field

The neat thing is that when you change the Leica Q3 to Macro mode (by turning the ring on the lens), the scale changes, and a new depth of field (DOF) scale is now in effect for the Macro lens scale.

Macro photography is a highly specialized discipline, and I have found that what may appear really nice in the preview often turns out to have too narrow of a focus in the final result. Therefore, in Macro photography, it is crucial to consider what you want to be in focus. For example, if you are photographing a flower, you may want the entire flower (while excluding the background) to be in focus, rather than just a detail in the center of the flower.

DOF scale for Macro: It's elegant how the Macro scale on the Leica Q3 changes when you turn on the Macro mode. You will also notice that the depth of field (DOF) scale affects a very small area of focus. At f/16, 'everything' from 0.22 meters to 0.29 meters will be in focus.
DOF scale for Macro: It's elegant how the Macro scale on the Leica Q3 changes when you turn on the Macro mode. You will also notice that the depth of field (DOF) scale affects a very small area of focus. At f/16, 'everything' from 0.22 meters to 0.29 meters will be in focus.

 

My hairdressers Japanese scissor in Macro mode. © Thorsten Overgaard.
My hairdressers Japanese scissor in Macro mode. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

       
 

When can I get a Leica Q3..?

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       

 

As of May 25, 2023 the Leica Q3 is available. The first batch to Leica Stores was largely preordered already before the release, and many stores also had previews the days before where they took orders. The official release parties on May 25 featured demo models, and then it is a matter of how fast Leica can produce enough cameras. Usually Leica cameras are on waiting list for the first many months before they are readily available in stores. So you actually got quite some time before you have to answer the question to yourself, "should I upgrade to the Leica Q3?"

 

Jewelry workshop in New York. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Jewelry workshop in New York. © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

The Thorsten Overgaard user-guides on Leica Q3, Leica Q2 and Leica Q

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The Q-STRAP by Thorsten Overgaard on the Leica Q2 Monochrom.
The Q-STRAP by Thorsten Overgaard. See more here.

 

     
 

Understanding exposure

The correct exposure on a camera is ensured by three parameters that match so that the image you record looks like what they eyes saw. Now darker, not brighter. Just exact the correct exposure.

It's sometimes referred to as a triangle. Not because it's part of a conspiracy but because it has tree elements you can adjust: Aperture, ISO and Shutter Speed.

Keep in mind that a camera is a dark box that doesn't let any light in, because photography is "painting with light" (which is the meaning of the words photo=light and graphy=drawing). So, when you take a photo, you are letting light in to draw the picture on the sensor. And the amount of light has to be exactly right. Too much light makes a white, overexposed picture, and too little light makes a too dark picture.

This is the fundamental of photography and how it's always been. It never changed, which is why I applaud any camera that keeps the controls and features of a camera to those simple few that enables you to just getting the right exposure.

 

It's all about light and there are just 3 controls for you to take control of so the picture looks right.
It's all about light and there are just 3 controls for you to take control of so the picture looks right.

Aperture

The aperture is a Latin word meaning “to open”. If you change the aperture ring, the ring inside the lens (made of metal blades) narrows the lens opening from wide open to small. When the aperture is wide open at 100% the maximum amount of light passes, and when “stopped down” the amount of light becomes as small as 2%. You can see the aperture blades inside the lens on the photo above.

The smaller the aperture "hole through" is, the more depth-of-field there is. The moew wide open, the more narrow-depth-of-field you have, and what some would say "a dreamy" or "artistic" look.

Shutter

The razor-thin metal curtain that separates the dark and the light is named after the shutters in front of windows that keep the sun out. In some cameras it's a curtain just in front of the sensor, in others (as the Leica Q2) the shuitter curtain sits inside the lens.

Shutter speed is how long the curtain is open and the sensor can be exposed to the light that goes through the lens.

The rest of the time, the curtain is closed and the sensor rests in the darkness. In the beginning of photography, the photographer's hand in front of the lens acted as the shutter to keep it all in the darkness.

ISO

ISO is a strange word because it is short for International Standard Organization. It's simply a measurement for how sensitive to light, something is. It goes from 100% to 50,000% (500 times more sensitive) in the Leica Q2. When you say 100 ISO, you are referring to an international standard of sensitivity to light.

See more in my “Leica and Photography Definitions”.

 
     

 

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Leica Q3 Specifications

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       
       

 

Leica Q3 Imaging Specifications:
Sensor Resolution Actual: 62.39 Megapixel
Effective: 60.3 Megapixel (9520 x 6336)
Image Sensor 35.8 x 23.9 mm (Full-Frame) CMOS
Image Stabilization Optical in Integrated Lens

Leica Q3 28mm Summilux Lens:

Focal Length 28mm
Digital Zoom 3.2x Maximum
Maximum Aperture f/1.7
Minimum Aperture f/16
Focus Range Normal
11.8" to Infinity / 30 cm to Infinity
Macro
6.7" to Infinity / 17 cm to Infinity
Optical Design 11 Elements in 9 Groups
Filter Size 49 mm (Front)
Exposure Control
Shutter Speed Mechanical Shutter
1/2000 to 120 Seconds 
Electronic Shutter
1/16000 to 1 Second 
ISO Sensitivity 50 to 100,000 in Manual Mode
100 to 100,000 in Auto Mode
Metering Method Center-Weighted Average, Highlight Weighted, Multi, Spot
Exposure Modes Aperture Priority, Manual, Program, Shutter Priority
Exposure Compensation -3 to +3 EV (1/3 EV Steps)
White Balance 2000 to 11,500K
Presets: Auto, Cloudy, Daylight, Flash, Manual, Shade, Tungsten
Continuous Shooting Electronic Shutter
Up to 15 fps at 60.3 MP for up to 63 Frames (Raw) / 67 Frames (JPEG)
Mechanical Shutter
Up to 9 fps at 60.3 MP for up to 70 Frames (Raw) / 76 Frames (JPEG)
Up to 7 fps at 60.3 MP for up to 74 Frames (Raw) / 83 Frames (JPEG)
Up to 4 fps at 60.3 MP for up to 83 Frames (Raw) / 104 Frames (JPEG)
Up to 2 fps at 60.3 MP for up to 164 Frames (Raw) / 947 Frames (JPEG)
Interval Recording Yes
Self-Timer 2/12-Second Delay
Special Options Beach, Fireworks, Landscape, Night Portrait, Party/Indoor, Portrait, Snow, Sports, Sunset
Leica Q3 Still Image Capture
Aspect Ratio 1:1, 3:2, 4:3, 16:9
Image File Format DNG, JPEG
Bit Depth 14-Bit
Leica Q3 Video Capture
Internal Recording Modes H.265 Long GOP/MOV 4:2:0 10-Bit
DCI 8K (8192 x 4320) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97 fps [300 Mb/s] 
UHD 8K (7680 x 4320) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97 fps [300 Mb/s] 
1920 x 1080 at 100/120 fps [100 Mb/s] 
H.264 ALL-Intra/MOV 4:2:2 10-Bit
DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97/47.95/48.00/50/59.94 fps [400 to 600 Mb/s] 
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97/47.95/48.00/50/59.94 fps [400 to 600 Mb/s] 
ProRes 422 HQ
1920 x 1080 at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97/50/59.94 fps [181 to 454 Mb/s] 
H.265 Long GOP/MP4 4:2:0 10-Bit
UHD 8K (7680 x 4320) at 23.98/25/29.97 fps [300 Mb/s] 
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 50/59.94 fps [100 Mb/s] 
H.264 Long GOP/MP4 4:2:0 8-Bit
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.98/25/29.97 fps [100 Mb/s] 
1920 x 1080 at 23.98/25/29.97/50/59.94 fps [20 to 28 Mb/s] 
External Recording Modes 4:2:0 8-Bit via HDMI
DCI 8K (8192 x 4320) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97 fps 
UHD 8K (7680 x 4320) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97 fps 
4:2:2 10-Bit via HDMI
DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97/50/59.94 fps 
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97/50/59.94 fps 
HD (1920 x 1080) at 23.98/24.00/25/29.97/50/59.94/100/120 fps 
Recording Limit Up to 30 Minutes
Broadcast Output NTSC/PAL
IP Streaming None
Built-In Microphone Type Stereo 
Audio Recording 48-Bit 16 kHz AAC Audio
28-Bit 24 kHz LPCM Audio
Leica Q3 Interfaces:
Media/Memory Card Slot Single Slot: SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II)
Internal Memory None
Video I/O 1 x Micro-HDMI Output
Audio I/O None
Power I/O 1 x USB-C Input
Other I/O 1 x USB-C (USB 3.2 / 3.1 Gen 2) Input/Output (Shared with Power Input)
Wireless 2.4 / 5 GHz Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac), Bluetooth 5.0
Mobile App Compatible Yes: Android & iOS
App Name: Leica FOTOS
Functionality: Access Stored Files, Adjust Settings, Firmware Update, Remote Control, View Live Feed
*As of May, 2023: Check with manufacturer for the most up-to-date compatibility 
Global Positioning (GPS, GLONASS, etc.) None
Leica Q3 Monitor
Size 3"
Resolution 1,843,200 Dot
Display Type Tilting Touchscreen LCD
Viewfinder
Type Built-In Electronic (OLED)
Resolution 5,760,000 Dot
Coverage 100%
Magnification Approx. 0.79x
Diopter Adjustment -4 to +2
Flash
Built-In Flash No
External Flash Connection Hot Shoe
General
Battery Type 1 x BP-SCL6 Rechargeable Lithium-Ion, 7.2 VDC, 2200 mAh (Approx. 350 Shots)
Dimensions (W x H x D) 5.1 x 3.2 x 3.6" / 130 x 80.3 x 92.6 mm (With Protrusions)
Weight 1.6 lb / 743 g (With Battery)
1.4 lb / 658 g (Body Only)

 

       
 

Leica Q3 Definitions

   
  By Thorsten von Overgaard  
       
  More resources:    
  Leica and Photography Definitions by Thorsten Overgaard    
  Leica Camera Compendium article by Thorsten Overgaard    
  Leica Lens Compendium article by Thorsten Overgaard    
       

 

  A lens is f/2.0 when the widest opening is 50mm divided with 2 = The lens opening is 25mm in diameter at it's widest.
  1:2/50 the description says. But what does it mean?
   

 

1: - Basically means 1 divided with. But why is it on the front of the lens? If you look close, a lens will often say 1:2/50mm on the front, meaning it is a 50mm lens with an f/2.0 apterture. The 1: itself is a ratio, that indicates that the aperture diameter (25mm) is the ratio of 50mm divided with 2.
It's a strange way of writing product information on modern products, but here's how it's right:
a) A lens is called a 50mm lens because there is 50mm from the sensor to the center of focus inside the lens.
b) A lens is f/2.0 when the widest opening is 50mm divided with 2 = The lens opening is 25mm in diameter at it's widest. Had it been an f/2.8 lens (1:2.8/50), the widest aperture opening would be 50mm divided with 2.8 = 17.8mm.

 

AEL = Auto Exposure Lock. This is a function that can be used when you want to reframe the scene, but keep the current exposure from changing. By default the Leica Q locks both Exposure and Focus when you press the release button half down.

AFL = Auto Focus Lock. This is a function that can be used when you want to reframe the scene, but keep the current focusing from changing. By default the Leica Q locks both Exposure and Focus when you press the release button half down.

AF = Auto Focus. The idea is that the camera does the focusing itself (the word auto comes from Greek "self").

AF Assist Lamp = The little red lamp on the front of the Leica Q that will light up in dark places so as to help the Auto Focus to see in the dark. If you put a hand in front of the lens and press the shutter release button you can see it in action.

Aperture = The f/ stop on the camera that regulates how much light passes through the lens. On a f/1.7 lens the lens is fully open" at f/1.7. At f/2.0 the aperture inside the lens make the hole through the lens smaller so only half the amount of light at f/1.7 passes through. For each f/-stop (4.0 - 5.6 - 8.0 - 11 - 16) you halve the light. The aperture of the lens is basically the focal length divided with the f/-stop = size of the hole (28mm divided with f/1.7 = the hole is 45 mm).
ORIGIN: Late Middle English : from Latin apertura, from apert- ‘opened,’ from aperire ‘to open’.

  Leica M shutter speed wheel: The camera in Aperture Priority Mode
  The camera in Aperture Priority Mode
   

Aperture Priority Mode. When the shutter speed dial on top of a Leica camera is set to A, it is short for “Aperture Priority” and allows the user to set a specific aperture value (f-number) while the camera selects a shutter speed to match it that will result in proper exposure based on the lighting conditions as measured by the camera's light meter. In other words, you set the aperture as priority (f/1.4 for example), and the camera calculates a shutter speed (1/250 of a second) that matches that. If you change the aperture to f/2.0 by changing the aperture ring on the lens, the camera will re-calculate the speed to 1/125 so as to get the same amount of light to hit the sensor (f/2.0 is half the light through the lens as f/1.4 and 1/125 if twice the amount of light on the sensor as 1/250).

 

  spherical (ball)
spherical (ball)
  a-spherical (non-ball)
a-spherical (non-ball)
   

ASPH = (Aspherical lens) stands for "aspheric design". Most lenses have a spherical design - that is, the radius of curvature is constant. These are easy to manufacture by grinding while "spinning" the glass. This design however restricts the number of optical corrections that can be made to the design to render the most realistic image possible. ASPH lenses (a-spherical, meaning non-spherical), however, involve usually 1 element that does *not* have a constant radius of curvature. These elements can be made by 1) expensive manual grinding, 2) molded plastic, or 3) Leica's patented "press" process, where the element is pressed into an aspherical ("non-spherical") shape. This design allows Leica to introduce corrections into compact lens designs that weren't possible before. Practically, the lens performs "better" (up to interpretation) due to increased correction of the image, in a package not significantly bigger than the spherical version.

There is another Aspherical lens manufacture technique: an uneven coating layer is applied to a spherical lens. The coating is thicker on the edges (or on the center, depending). Canon "Lens Work II" calls these "simulated" aspherical lenses. Simulated and Glass-Molded (GMo) asphericals show up in non-L Canon lenses, while the L lenses have actual ground aspheric elements.

A- means non, or without. From Latin, ex.

Sphere: ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French espere, from late Latin sphera, earlier sphaera, from Greek sphaira "ball".

     
ASPH (note the shape of the glass as result of pressing rather than grinding)
Normal spheric lens (grinded)   ASPH (note the shape of the glass as result of pressing rather than grinding)

 

Auto- means “self”. The idea is that when a camera has auto-(something), it does that (something) by itself.

Banding = Noise in digital images. Horizontal lines in a horizontal picture (if the camera is in portrait mode/vertical, the lines will obviously be vertical). It's simply noise; the result of uncontrolled algorithms working overtime with an image the sensor really can't see because it's very dark. (If your image has vertical lines in it, it is more likely that the sensor needs remapping).


This image at 6400 ISO, underexposed and then brought up to correct exposure in Lightroom, displays banding: Horizontal lines in the image. Leica M-D 262 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0.
This image at 6400 ISO, underexposed and then brought up to correct exposure in Lightroom, displays banding: Horizontal lines in the image. Leica M-D 262 with Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0.

Base ISO = The ISO the digital sensor was born with. Even a digital sensor goes from say 50 ISO to 25,000 ISO, it only has one base ISO. Any other setting is an algorithm that figures out how the image whould look if there was 64 times more light, or half the light, etc.
When you go down from Base ISO (for example 200 to 100 ISO), you can expect a decrease in quality. When you go up, the decrease is much less. For some sensors, you loose 2-3 stops by going down 1 step in ISO, but can go 8 steps up and only loose 1 stop in dynamic range. Basically, your ISO range should be from Base ISO and as far up as you can, before you see visible decrease in quality (mostly 3200 ISO - 6400 ISO).
Base ISO for Leica M9 is 160 ISO, for Leica M240 it is 200 ISO. For Leica M10 it is around 160 ISO. For Leica M Monochrom it is 320 ISO. For Leica Q and Leica Q2 it is around 100 ISO. For Panasonic Lumix S it is 200 ISO. For most Canon cameras the base ISO is around 100, for most Nikon cameras it is around 200 ISO.

 

  Bokeh = The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image, especially as rendered by a particular lens. Barrie Gledden
  Bokeh of a Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. British composer and producer Barrie Gledden.
© 2013 Thorsten Overgaard.

Bokeh = The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image, especially as rendered by a particular lens: It's a matter of taste and usually photographers discuss a 'nice' or 'pleasant' bokeh (the out-of-focus area is always unsharp, which is why the quality discussed is if one likes the way it renders or not by a particular lens). The closer you get to something, the 'more' bokeh' you get (in that the focus becomes less for the background and foreground at close distances than at long distances). ORIGIN from Japanese 'bo-ke' which mean 'fuzzines' or 'blur.'.

 

Bokeh: The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image. Photo at Bar del Fico in Rome. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.Bokeh: The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image. Photo at Bar del Fico in Rome. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

Camera - is today’s short name for Camera Obscura (meaning “a dark room”). Camera means Chambre and was used only as a Latin or alien word, actually only for Spanish soldiers’ rooms, until popularized in connection with photography in 1727: “Camera Obscura”. In 1793 the slang term “camera” was used by Sterne Tr. Shandy: “Will make drawings of you in the camera” and by Foster (1878), “The eye is a camera”. Camera Obscura was described by Iraqi scientist Ibn-al-Haytham in his book, “Book of Optics” (1021) and by Leonardo da Vinci in 1500; popularized and made widely known in 1589 by Baptista Porta when he mentioned the principle in his book “Natural Magic”. Johannes Kepler mentions Camera Obscura in 1604.
Camera = chambre (room), Obscura = dark (or cover).

 

     
 

Why is it called a "camera"..?

The word Camera is today's short name for Camera Obscura (which originally means “a dark room”).

Origin of the word Obscura means "dark" or "covered", and the word Camera means Chambre and was used originally only as a Latin or alien word, actually only for Spanish soldiers' rooms, until popularized in connection with photography in 1727: “Camera Obscura”.

In 1793 the slang term “camera” was used by Sterne Tr. Shandy: “Will make drawings of you in the camera” and by Foster (1878), “The eye is a camera”.

Ibn-al-Haytham mentioned Camera Obscura in his "Book of Optics" in 1021.
Ibn-al-Haytham mentioned Camera Obscura in his "Book of Optics" in 1021.

The concept of Camera Obscura was described by Iraqi scientist Ibn-al-Haytham in his book, “Book of Optics” (1021) and by Leonardo da Vinci in 1500; popularized and made widely known in 1589 by Baptista Porta when he mentioned the principle in his book “Natural Magic”. Johannes Kepler mentions Camera Obscura in 1604.

Camera = chambre (room), Obscura = dark (or cover).

 
     

C = Continuous shooting. In the menu of the Leica Q2 under the menu point Continuous Shooting you can define if the Continuous should be Low (3 fps), Medium (5 fps) or High (19 fps).

Central Shutter = Some lenses, for example the Leica S lenses and the Leica Q where a shutter is located in the lens itself. In most cameras there is a shutter curtain just in front of the sensor, and in SLR (Single Lens Reflex) cameras there is also a mirror in front of the shutter curtain.
In the Leica T/TL/TL2 the shutter is in front of the sensor, but only acts to "refresh" the sensor. In the Leica TL2, there is a mechanical shutter curtain from 30 sec. to 1/4000 shutter times, and digital shutter from 1/4100 to 1/40,000 shutter times. A digital shutter is simply "turning on/off the recording of the sensor.

CMOS sensor (as used in Leica CL, Leica T/TL/TL2, Leica M 240, Leica M Monochrom Typ 246, Leica S Typ 007, Leica SL, Leica Q, Leica Q2, Leica M10, Leica X, Leica D-Lux, etc.) = (Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) chips use transistors at each pixel to move the charge through traditional wires. This offers flexibility because each pixel is treated individually. Traditional manufacturing processes are used to make CMOS. It's the same as creating microchips. Because they're easier to produce, CMOS sensors are cheaper than CCD sensors. CMOS allow Live View and use less energy than CCD.

Contrast - The degree of difference between tones in a picture. Latin contra- ‘against’ + stare ‘stand.’

CS = Central Shutter = As in the Leica S lenses for the Leica S where a shutter is located in the lens itself. In most cameras there is a shutter curtain just in front of the sensor, and in SLR (Single Lens Reflex) cameras there is also a mirror in front of the shutter curtain.
In the Leica Q and Leica Digilux 2 the shutter is in the lens which makes the camera mirrorless as well as very quiet because there is not a metal shutter curtain going up and down in front of the sensor.

Depth - Distance between front and back. Distance from viewer and object.

Digital Zoom = Refers to zooming in on a scene digitally. All that happens is that the camera zooms into the area of the sensor and records only that. The quality will be less as it's a smaller part of the same recording. Zoom is originally used for an optical zoom lens where optics move inside the lens so as to enlarge the subject optically. This does not reduce the image quality/resolution the same way as digital zoom does. Generally, digital zoom can be performed on any picture later in the computer as it's in essence simply a crop.
In the Leica Q Digital Zoom refers to the possibility to change the crop from 28mm to 35mm or 50mm (and for the Leica Q2, 75mm as well). Choosing a different "digital zoom" simply shows frame lines for the chosen focal length in the EVF and in the final image (that is in fact the full 28mm frame), there is a pre-selected crop for the chosen frame when you open the image in Lightroom or Capture One Pro.

Digital zoom is in essence a crop of the image to make the scene appear closer. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
Digital zoom is in essence a crop of the image to make the scene appear closer. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

Digital Shutter = A digital shutter is simply "turning on/off the recording of the sensor. In the "old days" this had to be done with an actual mechanical shutter curtain; a metal curtain in front of the sensor (or film) that goes up for 1/125th of a second, for example. In the Leica TL2, there is a mechanical shutter curtain from 30 sec. to 1/4000 shutter times, and digital shutter from 1/4100 to 1/40,000 shutter times.

DIS = Digital Image Stabilization. This is a feature often offered in video recorders and some times for tele lens still photography (so as to avoid motion blur when the lens is moving during slow shutter speeds).

  Lens distortion looks like this. The lines are not straight. Our eye uses distortion correction. Lens designers can design lenses so they have very little distortion, or they can make less complicated lens designs and "fix" the distortion in software.
  Lens distortion looks like this. The lines are not straight. Our eye uses distortion correction. Lens designers can design lenses so they have very little distortion, or they can make less complicated lens designs and "fix" the distortion in software.
   

Distortion = In photo optics/lenses: When straight lines in a scene don't remain straight because of optical aberration.

Lens designers can correct for distortion to a degree so the whole image field is perfect corrected and all lines remain straight. In modern lens design many designs rely on Software Distortion Correction (SDC).

The eye adjusts for distortion so we always see vertical and horizontal lines straight when we look at things. Even when you get new prescription glasses (if you use such), you will often experience distortion in your new glasses. After a few days they eyes have adjusted for the glasses and the distortion you saw to begin with is now gone. Software Distortion Correction (SDC) is far behind what the human eye can perform of adjustments. (Also see my definition on Perspective for more on the eye and optics)

DNG = Digital Negative, an open standard developed by Adobe. It is a single file that contains the raw image data from the sensor of the camera as well as date, time, GPS, focal length, settings, etc.
The alternative is a RAW file + XLM file where the RAW file contains the image information and the XML contains the rest of information about where, how and when the picture was taken.
A Camera Raw profile (that is specific for that camera) in the computer helps the software program, for example Adobe Lightroom, to translate the RAW data into the image.

A raw file (or DNG) is simply the full recording of digital data (1's and 0's) from the sensor. In the computer, the sensor data is translated into the exact colors, via a camera profile.
A raw file (or DNG) is simply the full recording of digital data (1's and 0's) from the sensor. In the computer, the sensor data is translated into the exact colors, via a camera profile.

DOF = Depth of Field. This is how much of the image will be in focus or "acceptable sharp". The DOF is determined by the subject distance (the farther away, the larger area is sharp; the closer the focus is, the less of the lage is sharp), the lens aperture (the depth of field is narrow at f/1.4 and larger at f/5.6) and the focal length of the lens (tele lenses has very narrow depth of field whereas wide angle lenses has a wide depth of field) and film or sensor size (small-sensor cameras has a wide depth of field wheras medium format or large format cameras has a very narrow depth of field). As an example, a Leica 21mm Super-Angulon-M f/3.4 lens is sharp all over the focus field from 2 meter to infinity when set at a distance of 3 meters at f/3.4. The DOF scale measurement on top of the Leica lenses shows lines for each f-stop that indicates from which distance to which distance the image will be sharp. Shallow DOF is a generally used term in photography that refer to lenses with very narrow focus tolerance (which can be used to do selective focus; making irrelevant subjects in the foreground and background blurry so only the subjects of essence are in focus and catches the viewers eye).

Depth Of Field scale from Fujifilm.
Depth Of Field scale from Fujifilm.

Dynamic range. The grade of ‘contrast range’ (or number of tones) a film or sensor, or simply a photograph, possess between bright and dark tones. The human eye is said to have a dynamic range of 10-14 ‘stops’ (but because we scan area by area and compile a concept of the overall scene, they eye is often thought to have a much higher dynamic range), Film used to have 7-13 ‘stops’ and some modern sensors have up to 15-17 ‘stops’.

EVF = Electronic ViewFinder. A viewfinder where you look at a small screen through optics/prisms. The advantage is that you see what the sensor sees.


The EVF (Electronic Viewfinder) on the Leica SL 601.
The EVF (Electronic Viewfinder) on the Leica SL 601.

 

Exposure Bracketing = The possibility to set the camera to automatically record a series of images where the exposure is above and below what the camera measures. The idea is that at least one of the images will be correctly exposed.

f/ (f-stop, also known as aperture).

f- (focal length). Often given in mm, for example 90mm. In the past they were often given in cm or inch, for example 9.5 cm or 3.2 inch.

f-stop = the ratio of the focal length (for example 50mm) of a camera lens to the diameter of the aperture being used for a particular shot. (E.g., f/8, indicating that the focal length is eight times the diameter of the aperture hole: 50mm/8 = 6,25 mm); or the other way around, the hole is the focal length divided with 8).
ORIGIN early 20th cent.: from f (denoting the focal length) and number.
One f-stop is a doubling or halving of the light going through the lens to the film, by adjusting the aperture riing. Adjusting the f-setting from f 1.4 to f.2.0 is halving the light that goes through the lens. Most Leica lenses has half f-stops to enable the photographer to adjust the light more precicely.


The aperture blades inside the lens is clearly visible in this photoThe aperture blades inside the lens is clearly visible in this photo by Eolake Stobblehouse.

Flare = Burst of light. Internal reflections between (and within) lens elements inside a lens. Mostly, flare has a characteristic "space travel" look to it, making it cool. Particularly in older lenses with less or no coating of the glass surfaces to suppress this, it can be a really cool effect. In newer lens designs, the coatings and overall design try to suppress flare and any reflections to a degree, so that there is seldom any flare to be picked up (moving the lens to pick up a strong sunbeam), but instead a "milking out" (or "ghosting") of a circular area of the frame; meaning simply overexposed without any flare-looking flares.

Sunlight creating (fairly supressed) flare in the bottom right quadrant of the image of a modern lens.   The camera moved slightly to avoid the flare.

Sunlight creating (fairly supressed) flare in the bottom right quadrant of the image of a modern lens.

  The camera moved slightly to avoid the flare.

Older lenses with less coating, or without coating, are known to create flare that can look like this (Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 II Rigid model from the 1960's). © Thorsten Overgaard.
Older lenses with less coating, or without coating, are known to create flare that can look like this (Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 II Rigid model from the 1960's). © Thorsten Overgaard.

Fn = Short for Function. It's a button you can program. In the Leica Q it is by default set to be White Balance, so when you press it, you can choose which White Balance setting you want. You can press again and another function comes up. To complicate matters more, you can program the FN button to your own likes.

  A 28 mm lens has a 74° viewing angle
  A 28 mm lens has a 74° viewing angle
   

Focal length = On the Leica Q it is 28mm and originally referred to the distance from the sensor (or film in older days) to the center of focus inside the lens. Nobody uses that measurement, except those who construct lenses! For users of lenses, focal length refers to how wide the lens sees. The viewing angle, which is often given in for example 90° viewing angle for a 21mm lens, 74° viewing angle for a 28mm lens, 6° viewing angle for a 400mm lens, etc.
Each human eye individually has anywhere from a 120° to 200° angle of view, but focus only in the center.

Focus, in - Sharp and clear in appearance. Focus - “The burning point (of a lens or mirror)”. In Latin the word focus meant fireplace or hearth. The word was probably first employed outside of its Latin literal use as “the burning point of a lens or mirror” in optics, and then came to mean any central point. The German astronomer Johannes Kepler first recorded the word in this sense in 1604.

Full Frame (FF) = The size of the sensor is 24 x 36mm which is the format Oskar Barnack and Leica Camera AG invented with the first Leica that was introduced in 1925. Many other formats invented since, such as APS, APS-C and all usually refer to Full Frame ratio, by which it means what size they have compared to Full Frame.

  Different film formats and sensor formats illustration. Full Frame is "king of photography"
  Full Frame is "king of photography"
   

The 24 x 36mm Full Frame format is so "king of photography" that it has continued to be the ideal for all cameras. Besides this, there exists Large Format cameras such as 4x5" (100 x 125 mm) and Medium Format 6x6 (60 x 60mm amongst other sizes in that area).

Hue = A color or shade depending on the dominant wavelength of red, green or blue. The word Hue comes from Swedish hy which is "skin complexion". It is independent of intensity, so often (in computer editing programs for example), Hue is an adjustment along Saturation which is (intensity of color as compared to white).

ISO = Light sensitivity of the camera sensor is given in ISO (International Organization for Standardization). It's a standard that was used in film and is now used in all digital cameras also. The base ISO for the Leica Q sensor is 100 ISO which means that this is what the sensor "sees". All other levels are computer algorithms calculating the effect as if the sensor could "see" more (hence noise at higher ISO levels).
ISO goes in steps of doubling: When the ISO is raised from 100 ISO to 200 ISO, the camera only need half the amount of light to make a picture. For each step in ISO to 400, 800, 1600, 3200, etc the light sensitivity is doubled for the sensor (and the camera sensor only need half the light of the previous ISO to record the same image).

JPEG = A standard for picture format made in the 1990's by Joint Photographic Experts Group). Mostly referred to as JPG as in L1003455.JPG which would be the name for a JPG file from the camera.

Summilux = Refers to the maximum lens aperture - normally f1.4 , "-lux" added for "light" (ie. the enhanced light gathering abilities). In the Leica Q the lens is a Summilux even it is a f/1.7 and not f/1.4.

  LCos display
  LCoS display
   

LCOS (viewfinder screen in the Leica Q and Leica Q2) = Liquid crystal on silicon is a high-quality method for near-eye displays, better than LCD (Liquid-crystal display). There are two broad categories of LCoS displays: Three-panel and single-panel. In three-panel designs, there is one display chip per color, and the images are combined optically. In single-panel designs, one display chip shows the red, green, and blue components in succession with the observer's eyes relied upon to combine the color stream.

Leica = A compound word derived from " (Lei)tz" and "(ca)mera". Apparently they were originally going to use "LECA", but another camera company already used a similar name in France, so they inserted the 'i' to prevent any confusion.

Lens hood = (also called a Lens shade). A tube or ring attached to the front of a camera lens to prevent unwanted light from reaching the lens and sensor. In the past where lenses were not coated to prevent internal reflections inside the lens, the lens hood was often essential. These days where lenses are coated, the shade serves just as much as decoration and protection (bumper) as well.
ORIGIN Old English hod; related to Dutch hoed, German Hut 'hat,' also to hat.

Lens hood or Lens shade attached to the front of the lens to prevent light rays from the side to hit the optics, which could introduce unwanted light and hence reduce contrast of the image. These days where lenses are coated, the shade serves as decoration and protection as well.
Lens hood or Lens shade attached to the front of the lens to prevent light rays from the side to hit the optics, which could introduce unwanted light and hence reduce contrast of the image. These days where lenses are coated, the shade serves as decoration and protection as well.

Level Gauge = This is a tool in the viewfinder to see if you hold the camera 100% horizontal and/or vertical. You can turn it on in the Menu > Photo Live View Setup > Level Gauge > On.

Light = Tiny particles called photons that behaves like both waves and particles. Light makes objects visible by reflecting off of them, and in photography that reflecting off of subjects is what creates textures, shapes, colors and luminance. Light in its natural form (emanating from the sun) also gives life to plants and living things, and makes (most) people happier. So far, nobody has been able to determine exactly what light is. The word photography means “writing with light” (photo = light, -graphy = writing). Read more about light in my book Finding the Magic of Light.

Live View = This is the ability to see the image the sensor see, live, via the screen of a digital camera, or via an electronic viewfinder (EVF).

MACRO = Macro lens. The Leica Q2 lens can be turned to Macro which enables you to go close so as to enlarge smaller subjects. The word macro comes from Greek makros ‘long, large.’

Leica Q sample photo. The word macro comes from Greek makros ‘long, large.’ Leica Q in Macro mode, 1ii ISO, f/2.8, 1/500 second. © 2015 Thorsten Overgaard.
The word macro comes from Greek makros ‘long, large.’ Leica Q in Macro mode, 1ii ISO, f/2.8, 1/500 second. © 2015 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Maestro II - A processor developed first as Maestro for the Leica S2 and upgraded to Maestro II for the Leica S (Typ 007). The Leica Q has a Mestro II (Leica Q edition) processor developed by SocioNext Inc. based on Fujitsu's Mibeault architecture.

Megapixel (or MP) - Millions of pixels. See pixel further down. How many units of RGB is recorded by a given sensor by taking height x widt. A Leica M10 delivers a 5952 x 3968 pixel file = 23,617,536 piexls. On a screen the resolution you choose determines the size of the image. Say you have a 5000 pixel wide file and your screen is set for 8000 pixels wide. Then the image will fill only the 5000 pixels fo the 8000 and the rest will be empty, If you then change the screen resolution to 5000 wide, the image would be able to fill out the whole screen.

Meßsucher (rangefinder or distance finder) = Mess = range, sucher = finder. It is always correctly written with the "ß". There are technically not three "s", rather the "ß" and one "s" because it is a word constructed by the combining of two precise words.

mm = millimeter(s), as in a 50mm lens. (Earlier in lens history lenses focal length was given in cm = centimeters; as in a 5 cm lens). For anyone used to centimeters and millimeters, it’s no wonder. But if you grew up with inches, feet and yards, you may have had a hard time grasping what a 50mm lens was. But as lenses were designed first in Europe, the metric system with centimeters and millimeters was used to describe lenses.
The reason a 50mm lens is a 50mm lens is that there is 50mm from the focus plane (the film or sensor) to the center of focus inside the lens. When photography was a young subject, it was engineers who made it all, and the users were expected to understand. The engineers were so into the making of the lenses, that it apparently never dawned upon them that today’s users would think of a 21mm lens as a wide angle lens rather than a lens where there is 21mm from the sensor to the center of focus inside the optics.

ND = Neutral Density filters are grey filters that functions as 'sunglasses' for lenses. They simply block the light so that a lens can work at for example f/1.7 in sunshine.

Neutral Density filters. ND (Neutral Density) filters to put in front of lenses to reduce the amount of light that comes in. They don't have any other effect than that and doesn't change contrast, color or anything.
ND (Neutral Density) filters to put in front of lenses to reduce the amount of light that comes in. They don't have any other effect than that and doesn't change contrast, color or anything.

 

NFC = Near field communication is a technology that enables smartphones and cameras (or other devices) to establish radio communication with each other by touching the devices together or bringing them into proximity to a distance of typically 10 cm (3.9 in) or less.

  PASM in the menu of the Leica Q is most likely is made up from the letters of a mode dial on a traditional camera. Nobody knows for sure
  PASM in the menu of the Leica Q is most likely is made up from the letters of a mode dial on a traditional camera. Nobody knows for sure.
   

PASM (screen mode) = Basically means that you are in control of the camera and haven't selected any of the Screen Modes available in the Leica Q menu. PASM is most likely short for P = Program Mode / A = Aperture Priority / S = Shutter Priority / M = Manual Control (... what Moron comes up with those silly abbreviation; and then don't explain them in the manual?).

Pixel - Made up word from Pix (picture) and el (element). A pixel is the smallest full-color (RGB) element in a digital imaging device. The physical size of a pixel depends on how you've set the resolution for the display screen. The color and tonal intensity of a pixel are variable, meaning that each pixel contains RGB. This is different from a camera sensor's small eyes (photosite) that are an intensity of either red, green or blue. You could say that the digital sensor's photosite (where each unit collects just one color; red, green or blue) is the input technology, whereas the pixels on a screen (where each pixel contains red, green and blue) is the output device. So while sensors are measured in megapixels (mega = million), it's their output unit of pixels, and not the input unit of photosites that is measured and stated. See illustration below.

 

Here's an illustration of how light goes into photosites that each record either R, G or B and then - combined - makes up one pixel containing RGB. © Thorsten Overgaard.
Here's an illustration of how light goes through a color filter that enables the underlying photosites to each record if it';s an R, G or B color - combined - makes up one pixel containing RGB. © Thorsten Overgaard.

S = Single image. When the ring by the shutter release on top of the camera (or in the menu of a digital camera in case it does not have this ring on the ourside) is moved from OFF to S, the camera takes only one photo at the time (Single). The other possibility is Continuous where the camera takes pictures continiously as long as the shutter release button is helt down. (see above).

Saturation: How colorful, intense or pure the color is. Less saturation would be less colorful, more saturation would be more colorful. In today’s photography, de-saturating a photo on the computer will gradually make it less and less colorful; and full de-saturation would make it into a black and white photo.

A photo from Verona, Italy de-saturated, normal saturated and over-saturated. © Thorsten Overgaard.
A photo from Verona, Italy de-saturated, normal saturated and over-saturated. © Thorsten Overgaard.

Sensor = A device that detects a physical property (like light) and records it. A camera sensor is a plane plate with thousands of small “eyes” with (photosites) a lens in front of each (CFA, Color Filter Array), which each individually records the amount of red, green and blue light rays that comes through the lens. Together, Red, Green and Blue form all colors of the spectrum, which becomes a pixel. Sensor comes from Latin sens- ‘perceived’.

Screen Mode = A menu point in the Leica Q that allow you to choose different pre-programmed ways of recording stills with the camera. For example Sunset, Snow/Beach, Fireworks, etc.
Nobody knows what the modes does but they sound helpful. Panorama (move the camera and it takes a series of images; just like iPhone) and Time Lapse (interval of images to record change) are also in the Screen Mode menu and may be useful. All screen modes are equally undefined in the manual, so all you can do is try and see if you can figure out what happened. PASM is the setting you use to avoid any pre-programmed modes (see above.

SDC = Software Distortion Correction. A correction of lens distortion (not straight lines) applied in the camera and which is part of the DNG or RAW file. In Lightroom or Capture One Pro the SDC of the camera file is applied automatically (and cannot be removed), in software like AccuRaw one can open the DNG file without the SDC correction. Sean Reid Reviews have written a good article on what SDC is and does in "Software Distortion Correction".

SDC (Software Distortion Correction): In Lightroom the correction profile for the Fujinon 23mm is applied automatically and cannot be turned off. If you go into Develop mode in Lightroom and look under Lens Correction > Profile, you will see a message in the bottom with an exclamation mark. When you click on that, you get the message above.
SDC (Software Distortion Correction): In Lightroom the correction profile for the Fujinon 23mm is applied automatically and cannot be turned off.
 If you go into Develop mode in Lightroom and look under Lens Correction > Profile, you will see a message in the bottom with an exclamation mark. When you click on that, you get the message above.

Shutter speed dial - The dial on top of the Leica M where you can set the shutter speed manually. It can also be set to A which stands for Aperture Priority (where the camera suggests a shutter speed; or when you move the dial away from A, the camera will show arrows in the viewfinder, suggesting which direction to change the Aperture to, to get the correct exposure).

Shutter speed dial on a Leica M camera set to 1/1000 of a second.
Shutter speed dial set to 1/1000 of a second.

SLR = Abbreviation for Single-Lens Reflex; the lens that forms the image on the film/sensor also provides the image in the viewfinder via a mirror. The Leica Q has no traditional viewfinder and no mirror. the image seen in the EVF is what the sensor sees.

Summilux = Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f1.4 , "-lux" added for "light" (ie. the enhanced light gathering abilities). In Leica terminology a Summilux is always a f/1.4 lens and a Summicron is a f/2.0 lens. In the Leica Q2 the lens is f/1.7 but is called a Summilux because it is closer to f/1.4 than f/2.0.

Three-dimensional = Having the three dimensions of height, width and depth. In photography and lens design, three-dimensional effect is also the perception of even small micro-details; the texture of skin can appear flat and dead or three-dimensional and alive. Also, selective focus (foreground and background out of focus) can change the perception of depth. Also see Perspective.

Three-dimensional = Having the three dimensions of height, width and depth. Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
Three-dimensional = Having the three dimensions of height, width and depth. Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

Ventilated Shade - A shade is a hood in front of a lens that provides shade from light going straight onto the lens from outside what you are photographing, which could cause internal reflections like flare, which would make the picture less contrasty.
The ventilated shade has holes so it doesn't obstructs the view from the viewfinder. In many of today’s mirrorless cameras where there is no viewfinder looking ver the lens, so there is no actual need for a ventilated shade; but they are considered classic or vintage looking and are still in high demand. It makes no difference for the purpose of the shade (to create shadow) if it is ventilated or not.

Ventilated Shade for the Leica Q3. I make ventilated shades for most lenses and sell them from here.
Ventilated Shade for the Leica Q3. I make ventilated shades for most lenses and sell them from here.

 

Viewfinder = a device on a camera showing the field of view of the lens.
1) A built-in viewfinder in a camera that simply show the frame you get when you look through the viewfinder.
2) A rangefinder viewfinder which is also used to focus the lens. In Leica M cameras two pictures has to meet and lay 'on top of each other' for the picture to be in focus.
3) An external viewfinder, usually on top of the camera in the flash shoe, so as to show the field of view of lenses wider than what the built-in viewfinder can show (15mm, 21mm, 24mm, 28mm etc viewfinders exist)
4) Very simple "aiming-devices" on top of a camera that is simply a metal frame without any optics. Just a frame, as for example very old cameras (the original Leica), or when using cameras in diving where you can't look through the camera.
5) A Electronic Viewfinder (EVF) that shows what the sensor sees "live".

 

         
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    Index of Thorsten Overgaard's user review pages on Leica M9, Leica M9-P, Leica M-E, Leica M9 Monochrom, Leica M10, Leica M10-P, Leica M10-D, Leica M10-R, Leica M10 Monohcrom, Leica M11, Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom 246, Leica SL, Leica SL2, Leica SL2-S, as well as Leica TL2, Leica CL, Leica Q, Leica Q2 and Leica Q2 Monochrom:
Leica Digital Camera Reviews by Thorsten Overgaard
Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20   M9-P
M9 Mono 20 21 22 23 24 25      

                     
M 246 Mono 26 27 28 29
30
31      

                     
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44            
Leica M-D 262 1 2                                        
Leica M10
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8                         Video
Leica M11 1 2 3   5                                
Leica SL / SL2 1   3   5 6 7                              
Leica Q 1                                          
Leica Q2 / Q2M 1                                          
Leica Q3 1                                          
Leica TL2 1 2                                        
Leica CL 1 2                                       Books
   
   
   

 

Thorsten von Overgaard   I like simple things

I make things for myself the way I think they should be, and I use them for my travel to more than twentyfive countries a year. Once I am happy with the way stuff works, I make it available for you to buy.

SHOP THE COLLECTION:

 
Ventilated Shades for most Leica lenses. Classic look to the lenses, sturdy protection against bumps and scratches ... and yes, they shade for the light as well.  
Ventilated Shades for most Leica lenses
Classic look to the lenses, sturdy protection against bumps and scratches ... and yes, they shade for the light as well.
  Camera Straps for Leica M and Leica Q
"Simply a leather strap" – My handmade soft calfskin camera strap is the ultimate sophisication in simpliciy and luxury.
 
 
Camera Pouches for Leica M and Leica Q
The soft calfskin pouch you don't need ... but you just can't resist! For camera with lens, or to keep track of loose parts.
  "The Von" Camera Bag Carry-On Travel
Made to travel in style. Handmade by the best artisans in Milano, Venice and Verona to bring the owner a liftetime of happiness.
 
 
24h Travel Bag with lots of Carry-On space
I decided to make a bag with all the space I could ever need to bring onto an airplane.
  The Von Mini Messenger
The Ideal Walkabout Photographers Bag . Tested for three years all over the world by me.
 
 
Camera Backpack
I've made a series of backpacks becuase they are practical for many things.
  Document Carry-On for iPad or Computer
Put a mess of everything in this and you look stylish and organized.
 
 
Desk Blotters and Larger-Than-Life Mousepad
Nothing beats the feelling of soft calfskin leather on your desk ... but this one takes away reflections, damps the keyboards and makes you happy!
  Computer shade for MacBook Pro 15"
Better tonality, accurate colors and concentration for the eyes with my travel shade that snaps onto the MacBook with magnets and folds for travel.
 
 
Workshops & Masterclasses
With Thorsten von Overgaard for Leica enthusiasts and digital photographers in more than 25 countries a year. Pick your favorite city and meet Thorsten Overgaard.
  Photography Extension Courses
Start an extension course with Thorsten Overgaard, work at your own pace and take the time you want. At your own pace, and home
 
 
One-on-one Training anywhere in the world
Train with Thorsten Overgaard personally, tailored for you and private, any place in the world, or online.
  Video Classes: Learn from Thorsten Overgaard
Watch to learn about your camera, how to use light, how to do street photography, or simply to stay inspired.
 
 
eBooks on Photography
The foremost Leica expert and multi award-winning photographer Thorsten Overgard write books that teach and inspire.
 

Signed Prints by Thosten von Overgaard
Select photgoraphs from the archive of Thorsten von Overgaard, signed, sealed and delivered for your collection.

 
 
Adobe Lightroom Presets for Leica
As a Leica and Lightroom user you will love the simplicity and original look of the Presets Thorsten made for his Leica files.
  Used Leica Cameras
Ken Hansen New York Inc updated stock list of second-hand Leica lenses.
     
     
 
 

 

 


A Life With Leica from Northpass Media.

   
Thorsten von Overgaard
Thorsten Overgaard's Leica Article Index
Leica M digital cameras:   Leica L digital cameras:
Leica M11   Leica SL
Leica M10   Leica SL2
Leica M10-P   Leica SL2-S
Leica M10-R   Panasonic Lumix S5 II X
Leica M10-D   Panasonic Lumix S1R
Leica M10 Monochrom   Leica TL2
Leica M9 and Leica M-E   Leica CL
Leica M9-P   Leica L-Mount lenses
Leica M9 Monochrom   Leica R digital cameras:
Leica M240   Leica R8/R9/DMR
Leica M246 Monochrom   Small Leica mirrorless digital cameras:
Leica MD-262 and Leica M60   Leica D-Lux
    Leica C-Lux
Leica M film cameras:   Leica V-Lux
Leica M6   Leica Q2 / Leica Q2 Monochrom
Leica M4   Leica Q
    Leica Digilux 3
Leica M lenses:   Leica Digilux 2
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica Digilux 1
Leica 21mm Leica Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4   Leica Digilux
Leica 21mm Super-Angulon-M f/3.4   Leica R film cameras:
Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica R8 / R9
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH FLE f/1.4 and f/1.4 AA   Leica R4
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica R3 electronic
Leica 35mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leicaflex SL / SLmot
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95 FLE   Leica compact film cameras:
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0   Leica Minilux 35mm film camera
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.2   Leica CM 35mm film camera
7artisans 50mm f/1.1   Leica R lenses:
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f//1.4   Leica 19mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 "rigid" Series II   Leica 35mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 50mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 50mm Elmar-M f/2.8 collapsible   Leica 60mm Macro-Elmarit f/2.8
Leica 75mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/1.25   Leica 80mm Summilux-R f/1.4
7artisans 75mm f/1.25   Leica 90mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4   Leica 180mm R lenses
Leica 90mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.5   Leica 250mm Telyt-R f/4.0
Leica 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 400mm Telyt-R f/6.8
Leica 90mm Summarit-M f/2.5   Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 90mm Elmarit f/2.8   Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/4.0
Leitz 90mm Thambar f/2.2   Leica S digital medium format:
Leitz Cine lenses:   Leica S1 digital scan camera
Leica Cine lenses from Leitz Cine Wetzlar   Leica S2
    Leica S
History and overview:   Sony mirrorless digital cameras:
Leica History and Heritage   Sony A7
Famous Leica Usears   Fujifilm mirorrless digital cameras:
Leica Definitions   Fujifilm X-Pro 2
Leica Lens Compendium    
Leica Camera Compendium   "Magic of Light" 4K Television Channel
The Solms factory and Leica Wetzlar Campus   Thorsten von Overgaard YouTube Channel
Photography Knowledge    
Calibrating computer screen for photographers   Thorsten Overgaard books and education:
Which Computer for Photographers?   Thorsten Overgaard Masterclasses & Workshops
What is Copyright? Advice for Photogarphers   Lightroom Survival Kit (Classic)
Synchronizing Large Photo Archive with iPhone   Lightroom Presets by Overgaard
Quality of Light   Lightroom Brushes by Overgaard
Lightmeters   Capture One Software
Color meters for accurate colors (White Balance)   Capture One Survival Kit
White Balance & WhiBal   "Finding the Magic of Light" eBook (English)
Film in Digital Age   "Die Magie des Lichts Finden" eBook (German)
Dodge and Burn   "The Moment of Impact in Photography" eBook
All You Need is Love   "Freedom of Photographic Expression" eBook
How to shoot Rock'n'Roll   "Composition in Photography" eBook
X-Rite   "A Little Book on Photography" eBook
The Origin of Photography   "After the Tsunami" Free eBook
Hasselblad/Imacon Flextight 35mm and 6x6 scanner   The Overgaard New Inspiration Extension Course I
    The Overgaard Photography Extension Course
    "Why do I Photograph?"
Leica Photographers:    
Henri Cartier-Bresson   Riccis Valladares
Rodney Smith   Christoåpher Tribble
Birgit Krippner   Martin Munkácsi
John Botte   Jose Galhoz
 
Douglas Herr   Milan Swolf
Vivian Maier   Jan Grarup
Morten Albek    
Byron Prukston   Richard Avedon
     
The Story Behind That Picture:   Learn with Thorsten Overgaard:
More than 250 articles by Thorsten Overgaard   Leica M9 Masterclass (video course)
Thorsten Overgaard Workshop Schedule   Leica M10 Masterclass (video course)
    Leica M240 Masterclass (video course)
Leica Forums and Blogs:   Leica Q Masterclass (video course)
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Sean Reid Review (reviews)   Street Photography Masterclass (video course)
Heinz Richter's Leica Barnack Berek Blog   Adobe Photoshop Editing Masterclass
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    Adobe Lightroom Survival Kit 11
    Capture One Survival Kit 22
     
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    Thorsten von Overgaard Free Online Masterclass
     
Connect with Thorsten Overgaard:   Overgaard Workshops & Masterclasses
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Join the Thorsten Overgaard Mailing List   Thorsten Overgaard Archive Licencing
Thorsten Overgaard on Facebook   Commision Thorsten Overgaard
 
 
The Von Overgaard Gallery Store:   Von Overgaard Ventilated lens shades:
Ventilated Shades "Always Wear A Camera"   Ventilated Shade for Current 35mm Summilux FLE
Camera Straps "Always Wear A Camera"   Ventilated Shade E46 for old Leica 35mm/1.4 lens
The Von M Camera Bag   Ventilated Shade for Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH
The Von L Camera Bag   Ventilated Shade E43 for older 50mm Summilux
The Von Mini Messenger Walkabout Camera Bag   Ventilated Shade for 35mm Summicron-M ASPH
Desk Blotters 'Always Wear A Camera"   Ventilated Shade for older 35mm/f2 lenses
Sterling Silver Necklace   Ventilated Shade E39 for 50mm Summicron lenses
Software for Photography   Ventilated Shade for Leica 28mm Summilux
Signed Thorsten Overgaard Gallery Prints   Ventilated Shade for current 28mm Elmarit-M
Computer Shade for MacBook Pro   Ventilated Shade for older 28mm Elmarti-M
Video Masterclasses   Ventilated Shade E49 for 75mm Summicron
Photography Books by Thorsten Overgaard   ventilated Shade E55 for 90mm Summicron
Home School Photography Extension Courses   Ventilated Shade for 28mm Summaron
    Ventilated Shade for 24mm Elmarit
    Ventilated Shade E60 for 50mm Noctilux and 75/1.4
Gallery Store Specials   Ventilated Shade for Leica Q and Leica Q2
 
     
   
     
     
     
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
   
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
     
   
     
   

 

   
     
     
   
     
   

 

   
     
     
   
     
Above: The Leica Q3 review and user report. Out and about in San Francisco with the Leica Q2 Monochrom. © Thorsten Overgaard.
 

Leica Camera Reviews by Thorsten Overgaard
Leica M11
Leica M10-R
Leica M10 Monochrom
Leica M10
Leica M-D 262
M 246 Mono
Leica M 240
M9 Mono
Leica M9
Leica SL2
Leica SL
Leica Q
Leica Q2
Leica Q2 Monochrom
Leica Q3
Leica TL2
Leica CL
Leica M6

 

Leica reviews by Thorsten Overgaard. LEICA = LEItz CAmera. Founded 1849 in Wetzlar, Germany. Leica logo in photo by Thorsten Overgaard

LEItz CAmera = LEICA
Founded 1849 in Wetzlar, Germany.

 

Recommended dealer:

 

 

Leica Q Ventilated Shade Black Paint

Leica Q Ventilated Shade Black Paint

$299.00

Buy now

 

Yellow Camera Pouch

Yellow Camera Pouch

$498.00

Buy now

 


 


Leica Q3 Black



 

 

 

 

 

"The Artist's Guide to the Galaxy" by Thorsten von Overgaard. How to make it as an artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also visit:

Overgaard Photography Workshops
Books by Thorsten Overgaard
Street Photography Masterclass Video
Adobe Photoshop Editing Masterclass
Adobe Lightroom Survival Kit 11
Lightroom Presets by Overgaard
Lightroom Brushes by Overgaard
Capture One Software download
Capture One Survival Kit 22

Capture One Styles by Overgaard
Signed Original Prints by von Overgaard

Von Overgaard Gallery Store
Ventilated Shades by Overgaaard
Leather Camera Straps
Camea Bags
Calfskin Camera Pouches
Leather Writing Pads
Sterling Silver Camera Necklace

Leica Definitions
Leica History
Leica Lens Compendium
Leica Camera Compendium
Leica 21mm Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4
Leica 21mm Super-Angulon f/3.4
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4

Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0
Leica 35mm APO-Summicron-M f/2.0

Leica 40mm Summicron-C f/2.0
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M f/2.0
Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
7artisans 50mm f/1.1
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4
Leica 75mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/1.25
7artisans 75mm f/1.25
Leica 90mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0
Leica 90mm Summilux f/1.5
Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leitz Cine lenses
Leica L lenses

Leica M6

Leica M11
Leica M10
Leica M10-P

Leica M10-R
Leica M10-D
Leica M10 Monochrom
Leica M9, M9-P and Leica ME
Leica M9 Monochrom
Leica M 240
Leica M 240 for video
Leica M 262
Leica M-D 262

Leica M 246 Monochrom

Leica SL
Leica SL2
Leica SL2-S

Panasonic Lumix S1R
Leica R9 dSLR
Leica Q
Leica Q2
Leica Q2 Monochrom
Leica CL
Leica TL2
Leica Sofort
Leica S digital medium format
Leica X
Leica D-Lux

Leica C-Lux

Leica V-Lux

Leica Digilux

Leica Digilux 1

Leica Digilux 2
Leica Digilux Zoom

Leica Digilux 4.3

Leica Digilux 3

Light metering
White Balance for More Beauty
Color Meters

Screen Calibration
Which computer to get
Sync'ing photo archive to iPhone
The Story Behind That Picture
"On The Road With von Overgaard"

Von Overgaard Masterclasses:
M10 / M9 / M240 / Q / Q2 / TL2 /




 

 

 

Thorsten Overgaard
Thorsten von Overgaard is a Danish-American multiple award-winning photographer, known for his writings about photography and Leica cameras. He travels to more than 25 countries a year, photographing and teaching workshops to photographers. Some photos are available as signed editions via galleries or online. For specific photography needs, contact Thorsten Overgaard via email.

You can follow Thorsten Overgaard at his television channel magicoflight.tv.

Feel free to email to thorsten@overgaard.dk for questions, advice and ideas.

 

 

 




 

Thorsten Overgaard photo workshops and masterclasses for Leica photographers and digital photographers

the-thorsten-overgaard-Munich-Germany-photo-seminar-and-advanced-workshop-for-leica-photographers-and-digital-photographers

     
     

Join a Thorsten Overgaard
Photography Workshop

I am in constant orbit teaching
Leica and photography workshops.

Most people prefer to explore a
new place when doing my workshop.
30% of my students are women.
35% of my students dotwo or more workshops.
95% are Leica users.
Age range is from 15 to 87 years
with the majority in the 30-55 range.
Skill level ranges from two weeks
to a lifetime of experience.
97% use a digital camera.
100% of my workshop graduates photograph more after a workshop.

I would love to see you in one!
Click to see the calendar.

     
St. Louis   Chicago

Hong Kong

 

New York

Shanghai

 

Boston

Beijing

 

Washington DC

Tokyo

 

Toronto

Kyoto

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Taipei

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Seoul  

Seattle

Jakarta

 

San Francisco

Bali

 

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Santa Barbara

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Santa Fe

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Austin

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Clearwater

Perth

 

Miami

Melbourne

 

Cuba

Auckland

 

São Paulo

Napier

 

Rio de Janeiro

Moscow

 

Cape Town

Saint Petersburg

 

Tel Aviv

Oslo

 

Jaffa

Malmö

 

Istanbul

Stockholm

 

Palermo

Aarhus

 

Rome

Copenhagen

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Amsterdam

  Wetzlar

Frankfurt

  Mallorca

Berlin

  Madrid

Münich

 

Barcelona

Salzburg

 

Amsterdam

Vienna

 

Paris

Cannes  

London

Reykjavik   Portugal
Roadtrip USA   Milano
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


 

     
Buy eBooks by
Thorsten Overgaard
     
"A Little Book on Photography"   "A Little Book on Photography"
Add to Cart  

Add to Cart

     
"The Leica Q Know-All eBook"  
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     
"Finding the Magic of Light"   "Composition in Photography - The Photographer as Storyteller"
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     
"The Freedom of Photographic Expression"   "The Moment of Emptional Impact"
Add to Cart  

Add to Cart

     

The Portrait Book
How to Make People Beautifu
    Add to Cart
     

Preorder: The Noctilux Masterclass
    Add to Cart
     
Extension Courses
     
The New Photography Extension Course"   "New Inspiration Extension Course"
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     

Lightroom
Survival Kit 11
 


Workflow
Masterclass

Add to Cart  

Add to Cart

     
Video Classes
     

eBook
+Video

This is Street Photography

  Street Photo
Masterclass

Add to Cart

  Add to Cart
     


Leica Q2
Masterclass

  "Leica Q Video Masterclass"
Leica Q
Masterclass

Add to Cart

  Add to Cart
     
"Leica TL2 Quick-Start Video Course"
Leica TL2
Quick-Start
Video Course
  "Leica Q Video Masterclass"
Preorder:
Leica M9
Masterclass
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     
"Leica M10 Video Masterclass"   "Leica M 240 Video Masterclass"
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     
Lightroom Presets
     
Lightroom Presets Leica M10   Lightroom Presets Leica M9
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     
Lightroom Presets Leica TL2   Lightroom Presets Leica Q
Add to Cart   Add to Cart
     
Lightroom Dutch Painters Presets by Thorsten Overgaard   Leica Presets for Lightroom by Thorsten Overgaard
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"Hollywood Film Presets"
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Hemingway Presets for Lightroom by Thorsten Overgaard
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201 Lightroom Presets
+ 4 Export Presets
Add to Cart    
     
Capture One Styles:
     
"Capture One Pro Survival Kit"
Capture One
Survival Kit 22
  Leica Styles for Capture One by Thorsten Overgaard
Leica Styles for
Capture One
  Add to Cart
     

17 Capture One Styles
Add to Cart    


 


 
           
  · Copyright 1996-2023 · Thorsten von Overgaard


 

© 1996 - 2023 Thorsten Overgaard. All rights reserved.

 

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