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Leica M 10 Digital Rangefinder Camera Review and User Report
 
Classic Porsche. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH ff/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
   
 
     
   

Leica M 10-P Digital Rangefinder Camera

 

Index of Thorsten von Overgaard's user review pages covering Leica M9, Leica M9-P, M-E, Leica M10,
Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom, M 246  as well as Leica Q and Leica SL:

Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20   M9-P
Leica M10
V 1 2 3 4                               M10-P
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44         What if?
Leica M-D 262 1 2                        
Leica Monochrom 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
A
29
B
29
C
29
D
               
Leica Q 1         Leica TL2: 1 2              
Leica SL 1 2 3 4 5   Leica CL: 1 2             Books


Leica M10-P

By: Thorsten Overgaard. August 18, 2018. Updated August 21, 2018.

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The Leica "Professional" versions of digital rangefinders are mainly cosmetic updates. But some P models also have updates as a result of user-requests, as well as features first introduced in limited edition cameras.

 

What a Professional Leica M10 should have

The Leica M10 is a great camera that wins with practical use in the field. The simplified menu, the slimmer body and the fact that it just works and gets the job done is something you come to appreciate more and more each day that you use it. So, what should a Professional edition have?

 

A real successfull spedial edition model is the ones you don't like when they are released but fall in love with slowly - just to realixe that they are all sold now and only a fefw are available at much higher prices on eBay. It took me two months to hating the Leica M10 Zagato to find myself googling it and thinking about getting one.
Daily life in Los Angeles. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4 BC. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

Quiet Operation

The quietness of the Leica is legendary and has been what made it the preferred camera for presidential photography and other reportage work. It was one of the few cameras you could sit next to the President and take photos with, without anybody in the room noticing the sound.

 

Platon found a reflective moment when George W. Bush sat down in his favorite chair. Looking into the lens of a simple Leica.
Platon found a reflective moment when George W. Bush sat down in his favorite chair. Looking into the lens of a simple Leica.

 

Mirrorless cameras have come about which are soundless, as they have no shutter. What made the noise in the past, when we had film cameras, was the shutter, the mirror slapping, (and sometimes the aperture mechanism being adjusted), as well as the motorized rewind of the film.

A quiet shutter, and a faster one would be a wish for a "Professional" model. The Leica M still has the shutter and is unlikely to have a shutter-less sensor anytime soon. So is there a workaround?

A shutter-less camera, meaning one that uses a digital shutter, may sound as the ideal to many because it's completely silent and the electronic shutter reaches very high shutter-times of 1/12,000th or 1/16,000th of a second, where mechanical shutters simply can't compete. The fastest mechanical shutter we have seen in a Leica M was 1/8000th second in the Leica M8, but that one was noisy and was downgraded to a 1/4000th second shutter in later models.

 

Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

But the weakness of a digital shutter is that the sensor "collects the pixels" almost in the same manner as your grandmother opens her Christmas presents: one slice of paper at a time. Even though the sensor works much faster than your grandmother, the CMOS sensor records the image in stripes during exposure.

This results in stripes showing up in the pictures when the light has changed during the "electronic shutter closing". Much of modern light does exactly that: it flickers.

Many of the light sources we encounter at low shutter speeds are low-energy light sources, which means LED lights, low-energy light bulbs and fluorescent lamps. These all turn on and off at really high speeds that the eye usually doesn't see. But the for the sensor if means that the light changes on and off several times while the CMOS sensor is collecting the picture across the sensor. Hence, stripes.

For most cameras, the solution is to use mechanical shutter for speeds up to 1/2000 or 1/4000 and then electronic shutter for speeds faster than that. But many new cameras, such as the Leica Q, offer a choice to use electronic shutters at all times. Which is all fine, except when the light flickers at slower shutter speeds.

 

Reading in Cafe Grumpy, not noticing the camera. Leica M10 with Leiac 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
Reading in Cafe Grumpy, not noticing the camera. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

The Leica M10-P and Leica M10 sound comparison

The Leica M10-P released August 21, 2018 has a softer feeling shutter release button, and the sound is very quiet in real life. More damp and soft than shown in any video (because the camera is at a distance in real life, whereas the videos record the sound close by). Nevertheless, this video with sound comparison made by Leica Store San Francisco gives a good idea about the differnce between the Leica M10 and the Leica M10-P:

 

 

 

A fast mechanical shutter

It's unlikely that the Leica M will have a digital shutter anytime soon. It's a matter of the sensor used, and the Leica SL sensor can't just go into the Leica M model.

But a faster shutter curtain would be a solution; and one that doesn't make as much noise as the 1/8000 shutter curtain that was in the Leica M8.

A real Professional solution then would be a mechanical shutter that moves with high speed, and does so soundless. This is, as stated above regarding electronic light and stripes in the image, the optimum solution for any light condition you encounter.

The only problem in making an optimum mechanical shutter is that fewer and fewer cameras require a shutter. This becomes important when Leica has to find someone who can produce shutters for them. It becomes a more and more expensive part, simply because less are made. It's moving towards trying to make a perfect VHS player when everybody else has moved on to digital downloads.

The solution would be to make an electronic shutter (sensor) work in the Leica M10, or do as Leica did with the Central Shutter in the Leica S: invent their own perfect shutter.

Time will tell.

 

Street portrait in New York. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
Street portrait in New York. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

 

No more filters

Another wish for a faster shutter is that we (mainly I) are tired of filters.

With low-light performing lenses that you use in daylight and sunshine, not for speed, but for "composition in the third dimension" by using selective focus, and often extreme narrow focus along with artistic use of "bokeh" (the way the out-of-focus areas look) you need a fast shutter speed not to get over-exposed photos.

So far, the solution has been ND filters that reduce the amount of light, without changing colors or contrast (hence the name "Neutral Density" filters).

 


© Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

But no matter how excellent the filters, they will always leave a trace of color cast, add less precision to the exposure (because a 3-stop filter is seldom exactly 3 stops). But mainly they are dark glass that can cause internal reflections within themselves (especially variable ND-filters which are two layers of glass), as well as visible reflections into the lens: Often seen as a softer image when dealing with backlight in the photo; or even picking up strong light from outside the frame, which would milk out the photo and result in lower contrast.

To use a f/0.95 lens on a Leica M at 100 ISO, you need a shutter that works at 1/12,000, which the Leica M never did (as its fastest shutter speed was 1/4000). The Leica SL fits this criteria  as its fastest shutter speed is 1/16,000 at electronic shutter.

An f/2.0 lens on a Leica M10 with 100 ISO; you can get away with 1/4000, though sometimes you have to stop the lens down to f/2.4 to make sure you don't over-expose (or "blow out") highlights in the photo.

With a shutter speed at 1/8000, with a mechanical shutter, you can photograph wide open with an f/1.4 lens in bright sunshine at 100 ISO - without using an ND filter. With a 1/12,000 exposure time you can do it with a f/0.95 Noctilux lens.

It's coming. It must.

 

 

 

 

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I have made a few essential Styles for Capture One that does minor adjustments to the Leica files, so as to get the tones the exact way that I want them.

The Styles have as their ideal, the Leica M9 sensor , as well as the Kodachrome film (which also happened to be the ideal for Leica when they developed the Leica M9 sensor). Not that it matters much, but that is the reason why I made my own Styles: To get the that look, rather than a “digital sensor look”.

 

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Small size

The Leica M is a very compact professional camera. This may esily be forgotten if you use a Leica M every day, but speaking of cameras generally, only tourist cameras and the so-called "mirrorless" cameras are as small as a Leica M.

Every other professional performing camera comes with a footprint that doesn't allow you to casually "wear a camera" or sneak it into a place without getting noticed by security or people.

 


David Innerhofer by Michael Bassier.
David Innerhofer by © Michael Bassier.

 

Even within the ranks of the Leica camera models, for example the Leica CL and Leica TL2 "mirrorless" models are quite compact cameras - but come with lenses that far exceed the size you are used to as a Leica M user.

With the Leica M10 we got a smaller body as the design of the Leica M body returned to somewhat the size of the classic Leica M film cameras. Before the Leica M10, the need for a screen and a sensor behind the shutter curtain required more space than film. With the Leica M10, the electronics got re-designed to take up less space.

With two more millimeters taken off the thickness of a digital Leica M, we're back at the exact size of the film Leica M. It likely will never be smaller than that as that's the ideal, classic size of a Leica M.

 

Coffee in Brussels. Note how how many seconds it took before you noticed the camera. Photo: Patrick Verhulst.
Coffee in Brussels. Note how many seconds it took before you noticed the camera. Photo: Patrick Verhulst.

 

Speed

I feel that the ISO-speed of the sensor (the light-sensitivity) has been accomplished, maybe even exhausted. If you can't get 3200 ISO to work for you, then you should look at what you do, and how you do it. Professional photographers in the past worked with 100 ISO film and with f/2.8 lenses and made it work for even night or low-light photography at 1/8th or 1/15th second.

Now we have 3200 ISO and f/1.4 lenses (or f/0.95 if you want to go extreme), which makes things 7-8 times faster than previous.

 

Dr. Paul Wolff's photo from the 1930's using a Leica Elmar 35mm f/3.5 lens and 25 ISO film. Exposure was 20 minutes.
Dr. Paul Wolff's photo from the 1930's using a Leica Elmar 35mm f/3.5 lens and 25 ISO film. Exposure was 20 minutes.

 

In numbers, what a photographer required back then to make things work handheld at 1/8th second, you now have 1/500th second to accomplish.

Have no worries, though. No matter whether you ask for it or not, ISO speed will keep raising with 1-2 stops every four years, which means that in 2028 you will be able to do night photography not at 1/8th of a second, and not at 1/500th second, but at 1/4000th second!

ISO increase is a given.

 


Leica M9 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0. 1/8 sec at 800 ISO. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

 

Touch screens

Just because touch screens exist, doesn't mean you have to implement them everywhere. This must be one of those features that many ask for and which keep the development team at Leica Camera AG in Wetzlar spinning. Not even Apple has given in and provided a MacBook with touchscreen.

 

The idea of touchscreen goes forward in time, reaching new users accustomed to touch-screens, but on a camera that goes back in time, and which 'classic' users seem to demand stay old-school.
The idea of touchscreen goes forward in time, reaching new users accustomed to touch-screens, but on a camera that goes back in time, and which 'classic' users seem to demand stay old-school.


Touch screens should be used when they serve a purpose. As in the Leica T/TL/TL2 models where the whole concept of the camera is a touch screen used instead of buttons and wheels. And at the same time, the introduction of a touch screen on the Leica TL2 isn't used to make it more advanced with even more gestures and possibilities; but to simplify the whole operation of the camera.

The Leica TL2 is also a re-thought concept of a traditional camera, made into a logical user-interface for a new generation of photographers who use screens to observe, navigate, control and review.

The Leica TL2 touch screen experience is so simple that you could easily fail to notice the strength of its simplicity. The art today is not making a touch screen, but making a camera that is simply and intuitively operated by a touch screen.

In other words, don't look to a Fuji camera with 750 menu items and hope you can touch your way through them. Look to a Leica TL2 and notice that you can control everything with very few choices.

 

Ther's not much point in a touch screen, if ther isn't a philosophy behind it. The Leica TL2 is hands down the best use of touch screen on a digital camera. Not just a festure, but the entire concept of the camera.
There's not much point in a touch screen, if there isn't any philosophy behind it. The Leica TL2 is hands down the best use of touch screen on a digital camera. Not just a feature, but the entire concept of the camera.

 

The perspective of touch screen on the Leica M goes in two directions: Design and usability. It also goes forward in time, reaching new users accustomed to touch-screens, but on a camera that goes back in time, and one which 'classic' users seem to demand stays old-school.

Which way to go?

With a touch screen menu, it would be possible to rethink and simplify the menu items, which currently constitutes four screens within the menu. (With all possible choices, the Leica M10 has about 200 possible menu items compared to the 750 of a Fuji). But before one starts looking at a possible touch-screen, one should notice that the Leica M already has all the essential controls on the outside of the camera: ISO dial, aperture ring and shutter time. The screen is for setting the camera, not for operating it.

With a touch screen, you can remove the PLAY button from the back of the camera as PLAY can be simply a gesture across the screen (vertical to see pictures, horizontal to scroll through them, and double-tab to zoom in and out when previewing pictures). Also, the viewing on a touchscreen would make it easy to include other features such as "Send to phone".

The Live View (LV) button can also be removed as the choice of Live View would be made in the menu and activated (or not, depending on the choice of the menu), when the camera is turned on.

The MENU button could be the only button - or even be removed too; replaced with a gesture.

The "joystick" to the right of the screen could in theory be removed too, except it might be nice to have the arrows and the "set" button.

But essentially, this make it possible to remove all buttons from the back of the Leica M and replace it with a screen. And if the engineers at Leica can shave another 2 mm off the thickness of the screen, we'll be looking at a Leica M with a flat, even back. Which would be quite a piece of equipment.

Now, the art of making an analog-feeling touch screen - that's the trick. It's hard to see the traditional Leica M user who would want a "digital feeling" Leica M.

Then again ...

 

Touchscreen is the dope. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overghaard.
Touchscreen is the dope. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overghaard.

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Leica M10-P level gauge

 

The Leica M10-P has a level gauge, which is a help on screen (or in EVF) showing when the camera is in level. Very useful for landscape and architecture photography. The level gauge was omitted in the Leica M10 and is a feature depending on hardvare. Photo: Macfilos.
The Leica M10-P has a level gauge, which is a help on screen (or in EVF) showing when the camera is in level. Very useful for landscape and architecture photography. The level gauge was omitted in the Leica M10 and is a feature depending on hardvare. Photo: Macfilos.

 

Screen-less Leica M

The next step - now that we're dreaming and demanding - would be to remove the screen. Yes, simply remove it and have no screen. The ultimate simplicity for those who basically want to have a film camera, but do prefer the easier and faster workflow of digital files.

This was done on the Leica M-D 262, and was an elegant solution. The pleasure of putting your thumb on the leather-covered back of the camera, rather than feeling the glass of a screen, or the buttons on the back of the camera, is close to nirvana!

 

In modern times the most interesting thing seems to be what is happening on the back of the Leica M. In the case of the Leica M-D 262, the back is reduced to an ISO dial. A Leica M-D 10 version would have nothing as the ISO dial is already on the top of the camera.
In modern times the most interesting thing seems to be what is happening on the back of the Leica M. In the case of the Leica M-D 262, the back is reduced to an ISO dial. A Leica M-D 10 version would have nothing as the ISO dial is already on the top of the camera.

 

Where the Leica M-D 262 is the size of the Leica M240 body, a Leica M-D 10 would be as slim as a film Leica M.

Obviously, this is a simplified camera. That's the point. Even though there is not a great demand for it, it's one of those things you must do - because you can.

And then we haven't even talked about the Leica M10 Monochrom!

 


Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilus-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilus-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

 

The Personal Token

The perhaps most important feature of a Leica M10-P, or any Leica, is the feeling that you connect with this camera and it's yours.

There's consumer electronics, toilet paper, milk in the fridge and all that. We buy, we use and we forget about it. But then there are the few things we really connect with; some of us had a VW Beetle back when, which we never really left, some of us had a typewriter we wish we still had, some of us had a Nikon F3 that brings a smile to our face when we think of it.  Some of us a Bob Dylan record we picked up the morning it arrived at the record store.

Sometimes you keep those things, but they become less relevant or too difficult to fit into modern living. Sometimes you sell them, but then buy them again later, seldom able to get into the feeling again. It's as if that typewriter back then had a soul you connected with, and any similar model - even the exact same color and model - doesn't do it for you. The Bob Dylan album on Spotify doesn’t give you the same sensation as the vinyl record did.

In modern consumer societies where we "solve things and needs by buying stuff", finding the one thing that you really connect with, is quite something. It's rare and unusual.

 

 

The Leica M is unique in that many people I meet say "it just felt right" when they picked up a Leica for the first time. I have this engineer in Norway whom I was sure had taken the Leica apart to study it, but when I asked, he said, "No, I never touched a screw on it. I just knew when I held it that this was great engineering".

We all have our personal token. For some it's the Leica M3, for others the Leica M-D 262, for others it's the Leica M9. Whatever the connection is, and for whatever reason, that is our camera.

How do you make new cameras that are relevant in our time and age, that connect with current devices and technology, that provide the quality we’ve grown to expect, and at the same time become a personal token for us?

The answer is to make new models, different models, and to keep them rolling out. Also, the people who make them have got to eat. No one model appeals to everyone, so there is something genuine in the soul of a Leica that must always be present. No matter whether the camera has a display screen or a touch screen, or has no screen at all, or whether it is black or silver, or has a red dot or doesn’t have a red dot, or has a 5MP sensor or a 37MP sensor … the fundamental truth that the Leica seems to carry in its DNA must be intact.

This is the reason to make a Leica M10-P, a Monochrom edition, a version without a screen, and eventually a Leica M11. To keep it relevant, while still presenting what may very well become a personal token with that personal connection that few other things have.

Sometimes somebody puts so much life and creation into the thing they make that those things seem to live on.

 

Old friend on Carlton Way in Hollywood. Leica M10 with Leica 75mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/1.25. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
Old friend on Carlton Way in Hollywood. Leica M10 with Leica 75mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/1.25. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

 

The History of Leica M-P Professional models

In the past, Leica would make professional versions that didn't really have the designations P, but were made for specific professional needs. Alfred Eisenstaedt used the Leica IIIa (for "The Kiss in Times Square") and later models, and as far as I remember, he had the Leica M3 made with single-stroke and a few other tweaks for him - which later became the Leica M3 single-stroke model.

 


Alfred Eisenstaedt used the Leica M3 first model, had a couple of them tweaked, and then also got this Leica M3 no 1.000.001. Photo by Lars Netopil.
Alfred Eisenstaedt used the Leica M3 first model, had a couple of them tweaked, and then also got this Leica M3 no 1.000.001. Photo by Lars Netopil.

 

A "Leica M3-P" model does exist, but that is in fact a limited edition made in only 20 samples for the Leica Shop Vienna's 20th anniversary in 2012. Leica never made a Leica M3-P at the time the of the Leica M3.


A beauty to behold: The Leica M3-P is a limited run of 20 cameras made for Leica Shop Vienna in 2012. Photo: lhauction.com.hk
A beauty to behold: The Leica M3-P is a limited run of 20 cameras made for the Leica Shop Vienna in 2012. Photo: lhauction.com.hk

 

  Dr. Werner Simon with Henri Cartier-Bresson
in 1988
 

CEO Dr. Werner Simon with Henri Cartier-Bresson
in 1988, presenting him with a Leica M6.

Leica always was inspired by feedback from users. Back in the day, before the internet forums existed, feedback came by handwritten letters or occasional meetings with selected users like Henri Cartier-Bresson. That was how models progressed and the Leica IIIa (1935) for example got a 1/1000th speed dial as opposed to the mere 1/500th max speed that the previous Leica III model (1933) had had.

In recent years, Leica Camera AG sometimes may have read too much into the twitter on camera forums about what users and potential users might want. The Leica M240 is an example of a Leica M model that included perhaps more than what was good - an example that you should be careful what you wish for. You might get it; and the best Leica cameras, the most classic and most loved ones, have always been the simplest models.

 


I personally never get tired of the Leica M4 (1967). The silver version sells for around 1,000 Euro at Leica Shop Vienna.
I personally never get tired of the Leica M4 (1967). The silver version sells for around 1,000 Euro at Leica Shop Vienna.

 

"The Mother of all P models" could be said then to be the Leica M4-P, which was not really a Professional model in the sense of Professional. It was rather an attempt to bring the Leica M back to life.

First came the Leica M4 (in 1967), then the disastrous Leica M5 (in 1971), and then the "popular" Leica CL (1973). And then came the Leica M4-2 to try to pick up the pieces where Leica Camera AG had departed from the line of successful Leica M models. The Leica M4-2 was the Leica M4 with a few improvements (use of a motorized film winder as well as a flash hotshoe). Then in 1979 came the Leica M4-P with and extra set of framelines (for 28/75mm lenses), and that one was named M4-P for "professional".

A discussion has been ongoing ever since as far as whether the Leica M4 made in Germany was the better version than the Leica M4-2 made in Canada. After 50 years off discussion, nobody has arrived at an answer.

 


Leica M4-P such as this is 1,400 Euro at Leica Shop Vienna.

 

The Leica M4-P with its double-red-dotting and a bold Leitz print on the top plate, ironically is the opposite of what the more recent Leica P models became, which are simplified and more discrete editions of their original models. You get a "P" in the model name, but then they take away some other things.

 


Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.
Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

Leica P versions and limited editions

Recent version of the digital Leica M cameras, reissued as -P (or "Professional") versions have mainly had cosmetic upgrades.

The red dot was removed from the front of the camera and the camera would get a classic Leica engraving on the top plate.

Some models woul get a little more buffer memory (the Leica M-P Typ240) and/or a scratch-free screen on the back (thew Leica M9-P).

They are sort of special editions, with small changes from the main model.

They are not limited editions, as the limited editions are not only limited in numbers, but different. Often testing the waters for new technology or different ways of doing things (such as red framelines lit with LED in the Leica M9 Titanium).


A possible regret in life is if you didn't buy the Leica M9-P Hermes edition with three lenses made in only 100 samples. This model is a piece of beauty and goes up in value. You would have gotten paid for using it, had you bought it and sold it a few years later. The camera body is different than the Leica M9-P, and each of the three lenses are specially designed barrels. The first silver Noctilux is included in this kit as well. There were also made 400 sets of this camera with "just" a 50mm Summilux; and that version is experiencing a much less increase in value.
A possible regret in life is if you didn't buy the Leica M9-P Hermes edition with three lenses made in only 100 samples. This model is a piece of beauty and goes up in value. You would have gotten paid for using it, had you bought it and sold it a few years later. The camera body is different than the Leica M9-P, and each of the three lenses are specially designed barrels. The first silver Noctilux is included in this kit as well. There were also made 400 sets of this camera with "just" a 50mm Summilux; and that version is experiencing a much less increase in value.

 

Then there are the real special models, as the Leica M9-P Hermes that came with specially designed lenses, a Hermes bag and a general overhaul of the body design.

The Leica M60 without a screen on the back, and with an overhaul and rethink of the camera body.

Or the recent Leica M10 Zagato which is a complete overhaul and rethnking of the classic Leica M camera body.


The real successful special edition model is the one you don't like when it is released, but fall in love with slowly - just to realize that they are all sold out and only a few are available at much higher prices on eBay. It took me two months to go from not caring about the Leica M10 Zagato at all, to finding myself googling it and thinking about getting one.
The real successful special edition model is the one you don't like when it is released, but fall in love with slowly - just to realize that they are all sold out and only a few are available at much higher prices on eBay. It took me two months to go from not caring about the Leica M10 Zagato at all, to finding myself googling it and thinking about getting one.

 

Jealous haters seem to hate limited editions of Leica M cameras wholeheartedly, and besides the entertainment value in that attempt to level us all to the same level, the limited models often act as prototypes and testing ground for new ideas.

New ideas are not always popular in a Leica M, but if collectors pay for them, then the best and most popular of the new ideas can flow down into the more "common" future models.

 

 

If Leitz could see this

Leica Camera AG is a thriving business. Since Andreas Kaumann took over the company in 2003-2004 it has risen from a near-bankrupt German camera-manufacturer to a thriving business with an ever-expanding chain of Leica Stores around the world, new camera models, new lenses, and even side-kicks such as the Leitz Cine (formerly CW Sonderoptic) that produce award-winning optics for movies.

 
Dr. Andreas Kaumann. © Thorsten Ovegaard.
  Dr. Andreas Kaumann. © Thorsten Ovegaard.

And let's not forget that Leica also does lenses for Panasonic, Huawei smartphones, and their own line of Leica binoculars. Latest spring-off is Leica watches, which may seem an oddity, except that the Leica factory in Portugal used to be a watch manufacturer until Leica Camera AG took over the factory and it's 1,200 employees in the 1980's.

The Leica Stores, as well as any modern consumer-oriented business, requires innovation and that new models are being introduced ever so often. Look at it this way: The Leica Stores need to sell Leica cameras and lenses, because they have nothing else to sell That alone is a guarantee for us Leica users that Leica Camera AG will keep developing new cameras and lenses that will pique our interest.

So far the Leica M has been launched with new models every 3-4 years, with Leica M-P models halfway in the product cycle (18-24 months after the introduction); as well as special editions to keep the jealous haters busy hating and the collectors happy collecting.

In the last few years we have seen the presentation of the Leica Q, the Leica T/TL/TL2 and the Leica SL. All systems seem to sell well, and so do the binoculars that few of us ever give a thought to (entirely different audience).

 

The Leitz factory in Wetzlar, 1957.
The Leitz factory in Wetzlar, 1957.

 

The Leitz family launched the Leica camera back in 1925 not only because they thought it was a great concept that Oskar Barnack had come up with. They also did so because they wanted to find ways to keep their workforce in Wetzlar busy in times of a great global crisis. Also, the Leitz factory had lost the Russian market for microscopes after World War I (microscopes were the main business of Leitz; a part of the factory that separated from cameras in the 1980's).

The Leitz family were entrepreneurs, as well as factory owners with an almost fatherly concern for their employees. They would be proud to see how Leica Camera AG is thriving these days.


The factory in Wetzlar 2018. Read also my Story Behind That Picture for some atmosphere from the Leica factory.
The factory in Wetzlar 2018. Read also my Story Behind That Picture for some atmosphere from the Leica factory.

 

 

         
  My other Leica M10 articles  
         
 
The Force Awakens
 
Leica M10 in the Rain
 
         
 
Sexy Stuff for the Leica M10
 
Leica M10 Masterclass (video on-line course)
 
         
 
The Leica M10 Video Review
 
Leica M10 Goes to Cuba
 
         

 

 

Which Leica M to get?

I won't get into that in this article. But here is an overview of the different models. Currently Leica Camera AG offers some discounts on Leica M 240 with lenses that might make that camera the choice while Leica M10 is on waiting list.


Leica M10 and Leica M10-P comparison . Photo:Leica Store San Francisco review
Leica M10 and Leica M10-P. Photo:Leica Store San Francisco.

 

Model Leica
M8
Leica
M8.2
Leica
M9
Leica
M9-P
M
Typ 240
M-P
Typ 240
M
Typ 262

M-D
262
Leica
M10
Leica M10-P
EVF No No No No 1.4MP
EVF-2
External
1.4MP
EVF-2
External
No No 2.4 MP Typ 0020 Visoflex with GPS device.
2.4 MP Typ 0020 Visoflex with GPS device.
Screen               No 3" 3" touch
Start 2006 2008 09/2009 06/2011 03/2013 11/2014 12/2015 05/2016 01/2017 08/2018
End 2009 2009 2012 2012 - - - - - -
MP 10 10 18 18 24 24 24 24 24 24
Sensor CCD CCD CCD CCD CMOS CMOS CMOS CMOS CMOS CMOS
Format 18x27 18x27 24x36 24x36 24x36 24x36 24x36 24x36 24x36 24x36
AA filter No No No No No No No No No No
Video No No No No Yes Yes No No No No
Adapters Leica
screw
mount
Leica
screw
mount
Leica
screw
mount
Leica
screw
mount
Leica R
Nikkor
LeicaCine
Leica
screw mount
Leica R
Nikkor
LeicaCine
Leica
screw mount
Leica screw mount

Leica
screw
mount

Leica R
Nikkor
LeicaCine
Leica
screw mount

Leica R
Nikkor
LeicaCine
Leica
screw mount
Shutterless No No No No No No No No No No
Mirrorless Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Live View No No No No Yes Yes No No Yes Yes
WiFi No No No No No No No No Yes Yes
Level gauge No No No No Yes Yes No No No Yes
Framelines         LED
White or
Red
LED
White or
Red
LED
White
LED
White
LED
White or
Red
LED
White or
Red
DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG DNG
JPG JPG JPG JPG JPG JPG JPG JPG No JPG JPG
Base ISO 160 160 160 160 200 200 200 200 100 100
Max ISO 2800 2800 3200 3200 6400 6400 6400 6400 50,000 50,000
Processor         Maestro Maestro Maestro Maestro MaestroII MaestroII
Buffer No No No No No 2GB 1GB 1GB 2GB 2GB
Frame selector Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes
USB port Yes Yes Yes Yes Extra Extra No No Extra Extra
GPS         Extra
handgrip
Extra
handgrip
No No Extra
(Sits in
the EVF)
Extra
(Sits in
the EVF)
Viewfinder     0.68X 0.68X 0.68X 0.68X 0.68X 0.68X 0.73X 0.73X
Weather sealed No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Weight     580g 600g 680g 680g 580g 680g 647g 660g
Digital color filters for B&W         Built-in Built-in        
Price $US new 4,800 5,995 7,000 8,000 6,595 6,995 5,395 5,995 7,595 7.995
Price Pounds 2,990   4,950 5,395            
Price Euro                    

 

 

 

To be continued

I hope you enjoyed todays article on the Leica M10-P. As always, feel free to email me with questions, ideas and suggestions.

 

 

         
  New from Thorsten Overgaard:
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Leica M10-P Forums:

L-Camera-Forum. Also known as Leica User Forum.
Leica M10 User Forum Facebook (curated by Thorsten von Overgaard)
The Leica Meet on Facebook

 

Join a Leica Society:

LHSA Leica Historical Society
Leica Historical Society UK
Leica Historical Society Germany

 

Leica M10-P Rumors & Speculations:

LeicaRumors.com: "Leica M10-P is rumored for August 21, 2018"
Saw Ichiro: "Leica M10-P?" (in Japanese)

 

Leica M10-P User Reports:

Jono Slack: Leica M10-P

 

Leica M10-P Reviews:

Leica M10-P: Nearly Silent Shutter, Touchscreen (By Josh Lehrer, Red Dot Forum as of August 21, 2018)
Mathieu Bitton - "Just a historian with the greatest camera" (Mathieu Bitton video review)
Reidreviews.com Leica M10-P test and review (as of August 1, 2018)
Jono Slack: Sample photos and impressions (LUF) (as of August 21, 2018).
MacFilos and Red Dot Cameras: "Leica M10-P Video Review" (as of August 21, 2018)
Leica M10-P (By DPreview as of August 21, 2018).

 

 

Leica M10-P Definitions:

AF = Auto Focus. The idea is that the camera does the focusing itself (the word auto comes from Greek "self").

Aperture = (also written as f/) = The metal blades inside a camera lens that regulates how much light passes through the lens. On a f/1.4 lens, the lens is "fully open" at f/1.4. At f/2.0 the aperture inside the lens make the hole through the lens smaller so only half the amount of light at f/1.4 passes through. For each f/-stop (like f/4.0 - f/5.6 - f/8.0 - f/11 - f/16) you halve the light. The f/ fundamentally means "f divided with": The aperture of the lens is basically the focal length divided with the f/-stop = size of the hole (50mm divided with f/2.0 = the hole is 25 mm in diameter, or 50mm at f/1.4 is 50mm divided with 1.4 = the hole throug is 36mm. ). ORIGIN: Late Middle English : from Latin apertura, from apert- ‘opened,’ from aperire ‘to open’.

The aperture blades inside the lens is clearly visible in this photo.
The aperture blades inside the lens is clearly visible in this photo.

ASPH = stands for "aspheric design". Most lenses have a spherical design - that is, the radius of curvature is constant. These are easy to manufacture by grinding while "spinning" the glass. This design however restricts the number of optical corrections that can be made to the design to render the most realistic image possible. ASPH lenses, however, involve usually 1 element that does *not* have a constant radius of curvature. These elements can be made by 1) expensive manual grinding, 2) molded plastic, or 3) Leica's patented "press" process, where the element is pressed into an aspherical ("non-spherical") shape. This design allows Leica to introduce corrections into compact lens designs that weren't possible before. Practically, the lens performs "better" (up to interpretation) due to increased correction of the image, in a package not significantly bigger than the spherical version. Sphere: ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French espere, from late Latin sphera, earlier sphaera, from Greek sphaira "ball".

     
Normal spheric lens (grinded)   ASPH (note the shape of the glass as result of pressing rather than grinding)

 

Banding = Noise in digital images. Horizontal lines in a horizontal picture (if the camera is in portrait mode/vertical, the lines will be obviously be vertical). It's simply noise; the result of uncontrolled algorithms working overtime with an image the sensor really can't see because it's very dark. (If your image has vertical lines in it, it is more likely that the sensor needs remapping).

Bokeh = The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image, especially as rendered by a particular lens: It's a matter of taste and usually photographers discuss a 'nice' or 'pleasant' bokeh (the out-of-focus area is always unsharp why the quality discussed is if one likes the way it renders or not by a particular lens). The closer you get to something, the 'more' bokeh' you get (in that the focus becomes less for the background and foreground at close distances than at long distances). ORIGIN from Japanese 'bo-ke' which mean 'fuzzines' or 'blur.'.

Bokeh: The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image. Photo at Bar del Fico in Rome. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
Bokeh: The visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image. Photo at Bar del Fico in Rome. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

Camera - is today’s short name for Camera Obscura (meaning “a dark room”). Camera means Chambre and was used only as a Latin or alien word, actually only for Spanish soldiers’ rooms, until popularized in connection with photography in 1727: “Camera Obscura”. In 1793 the slang term “camera” was used by Sterne Tr. Shandy: “Will make drawings of you in the camera” and by Foster (1878), “The eye is a camera”. Camera Obscura was described by Iraqi scientist Ibn-al-Haytham in his book, “Book of Optics” (1021) and by Leonardo da Vinci in 1500; popularized and made widely known in 1589 by Baptista Porta when he mentioned the principle in his book “Natural Magic”. Johannes Kepler mentions Camera Obscura in 1604.
Camera = chambre (room), Obscura = dark (or cover).

Central Shutter = Some lenses, for example the Leica S lenses and the Leica Q where a shutter is located in the lens itself. In most cameras there is a shutter curtain just in front of the sensor, and in SLR (Single Lens Reflex) cameras there is also a mirror in front of the shutter curtain.
In the Leica T/TL/TL2 the shutter is in front of the sensor, but only acts to "refresh" the sensor. In the Leica TL2, there is a mechanical shutter curtain from 30 sec. to 1/4000 shutter times, and digital shutter from 1/4100 to 1/40,000 shutter times. A digital shutter is simply "turning on/off the recording of the sensor.

CMOS sensor (as used in Leica M10, Leica CL, Leica LT/TL/TL2, Leica SL, Leica Q, Leica X, Leica D-Lux, etc.)
= (Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) chips use transistors at each pixel to move the charge through traditional wires. This offers flexibility because each pixel is treated individually. Traditional manufacturing processes are used to make CMOS. It's the same as creating microchips. Because they're easier to produce, CMOS sensors are cheaper than CCD sensors. CMOS allow Live View and use less energy than CCD.

Contrast - The degree of difference between tones in a picture. Latin contra- ‘against’ + stare ‘stand.’

Digital Shutter = A digital shutter is simply "turning on/off the recording of the sensor. In the "old days" this had to be done with an actual mechanical shutter curtain; a metal curtain in front of the sensor (or film) that goes up for 1/125th of a second, for example. In the Leica TL2, there is a mechanical shutter curtain from 30 sec. to 1/4000 shutter times, and digital shutter from 1/4100 to 1/40,000 shutter times.

Digital Zoom = In some cameras (but not the Leica TL2), there exist a possibility to enable "digital zoom", which basically means the camera can zoom closer into something than the lens is actually designed to. The way digital zoom works traditionally is that the camera simply crops the picture; so you get closer, but without resolution. In other words, it's the same as if you took a normal photo and then cropped into the center of it.

DIS = Digital Image Stabilization. This is a feature often offered in video recorders and sometimes for tele lens still photography (so as to avoid motion blur when the lens is moving during slow shutter speeds).

 
  Lens distortion looks like this. The lines are not straight. Our eye uses distortion correction. Lens designers can design lenses so they have very little distortion, or they can make less complicated lens designs and "fix" the distortion in software.
   

Distortion = In photo optics/lenses: When straight lines in a scene don't remain straight because of optical aberration.

Lens designers can correct for distortion to a degree so the whole image field is perfect corrected and all lines remain straight. In modern lens design many designs rely on Software Distortion Correction (SDC).

The eye adjusts for distortion so we always see vertical and horizontal lines straight when we look at things. Even when you get new prescription glasses (if you use such), you will often experience distortion in your new glasses. After a few days they eyes have adjusted for the glasses and the distortion you saw to begin with is now gone. Software Distortion Correction (SDC) is far behind what the human eye can perform of adjustments. (Also see my definition on Perspective for more on the eye and optics)

DNG = Digital Negative, an open standard developed by Adobe. It is a single file that contains the raw image data from the sensor of the camera as well as date, time, GPS, focal length, settings, etc.
The alternative is a RAW file + XLM file where the RAW file contains the image information and the XML contains the rest of information about where, how and when the picture was taken.
A Camera Raw profile (that is specific for that camera) in the computert fact

helps the software program, for example Adobe Lightroom, to translate the RAW data into the image.

DOF = Depth of Field. This is how much of the image will be in focus. Shallow DOF is a generally used term in photography that refer to lenses with very narrow focus tolerance (which can be used to do selective focus; for artistic reasons or for specific storytelling, like making irrelevant subjects in the foreground and background blurry so only the subjects of essence are in focus and catches the viewers eye).

Depth of Field: The trees and buildings in the background is very much out of focus, and the handrail you can see behind, in the bottom of this photo is slightly out of focus. Princess Joy Villa. Leica TL2 with Leica 80mm Summilux-R f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
Depth of Field: The trees and buildings in the background is very much out of focus, and the handrail you can see behind, in the bottom of this photo is slightly out of focus. Princess Joy Villa. Leica TL2 with Leica 80mm Summilux-R f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Depth Of Field scale from Fujifilm.
Depth Of Field scale from Fujifilm.

 

Depth - Distance between front and back. Distance from viewer and object.

Dynamic range. The grade of ‘contrast range’ (or number of tones) a film or sensor, or simply a photograph, possess between bright and dark tones. The human eye is said to have a dynamic range of 10-14 ‘stops’ (but because we scan area by area and compile a concept of the overall scene, they eye is often thought to have a much higher dynamic range), Film used to have 7-13 ‘stops’ and some modern sensors have up to 15-17 ‘stops’.

Elmarit = Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f2.8 . The name is obviously derived from the earlier (and slower) "Elmar" designation. Not every f/2.8 lens is called an "Elmarit" though, the most obvious current exception being the 50mm f2.8 Elmar-M collapsible lens which for nostalgia and marketing reasons has kept the original 1930's Elmar name (the 50mm f3.5 collapsible Elmar, manufactured 1930-59, was one of Leica's most famous and popular lenses).

EVF = Electronic ViewFinder. The Leica M10 and the Leica T/TL/TL2 uses the Leica Visoflex model 0020.

Exposure Bracketing = The possibility to set the camera to automatically record a series of images where the exposure is above and below what the camera measures. The idea is that at least one of the images will be correctly exposed.

Fn = Short for Function. It's a button you can program. On the Leica M10 has a front button that can be programmed to other Fn (Functions).

Focus, in - Sharp and clear in appearance. Focus - “The burning point (of a lens or mirror)”. In Latin the word focus meant fireplace or hearth. The word was probably first employed outside of its Latin literal use as “the burning point of a lens or mirror” in optics, and then came to mean any central point. The German astronomer Johannes Kepler first recorded the word in this sense in 1604.

 
  A 28 mm lens has a 74° viewing angle
   

Focal length = (also written as f-) = On the Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4 it is 35mm and originally referred to the distance from the sensor (or film in older days) to the center of focus inside the lens. Nobody uses that measurement, except those who construct lenses! For users of lenses, focal length refers to how wide the lens sees. The viewing angle, which is often given in for example 90° viewing angle for a 21mm lens, 74° viewing angle for a 28mm lens, 6° viewing angle for a 400mm lens, etc.
Each human eye individually has anywhere from a 120° to 200° angle of view, but focuses only in the center.
The Leica TL2 has a APS-C sensor, which "crops" the traditional focal lengths with 1.5X, reducing the angle of view of view with 1.5X.

Full Frame (FF) = The size of the sensor is 24 x 36mm which is the format Oskar Barnack and Leica Camera AG invented with the first Leica that was introduced in 1925. Many other formats invented since, such as APS, APS-C and all usually refer to Full Frame ratio, by which it means what size they have compared to Full Frame.

 
  Full Frame is "king of photography"
   

The 24 x 36mm Full Frame format is so "king of photography" that it has continued to be the ideal for all cameras. Besides this, there exists Large Format cameras such as 4x5" (100 x 125 mm) and Medium Format 6x6 (60 x 60mm amongst other sizes in that area).

ISO = Light sensitivity of the camera sensor is given in ISO (International Organization for Standardization). It's a standard that was used in film and is now used in all digital cameras also. The base ISO for the Leica TL2 sensor is around 100-150 which means that this is what the sensor "sees". All other levels are computer algorithms calculating the effect as if the sensor could "see" more (hence noise at higher ISO levels).
ISO goes in steps of doubling: When the ISO is raised from 100 ISO to 200 ISO, the camera only need half the amount of light to make the same picture. For each step in ISO to 400, 800, 1600, 3200, etc. the light sensitivity is doubled for the sensor (and the camera sensor only need half the light of the previous ISO to record the same image).

6400 ISO photo from Hollywood at night. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
6400 ISO photo from Hollywood at night. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

JPEG = A standard for picture format made in the 1990's by Joint Photographic Experts Group). Mostly referred to as JPG as in L1003455.JPG which would be the name for a JPG file from the camera.

Summicron = Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f/2.0 . There are many guesses how this name came about, a popular one being that the "summi" came from "summit" (summit means the highest point of a hill or mountain; the highest attainable level of achievement) while the "cron" came from "chroma" (ie. for colour). Not so: The name (Summi)cron was used because the lens used Crown glass for the first time, which Leitz bought from Chance Brothers in England. The first batch of lenses were named Summikron (Crown = Krone in Deutsch). The Summi(cron) is a development from the orignal Summar (the 50mm f2.0 lens anno 1933)

Summilux = Refers to the maximum lens aperture - normally f1.4 , "-lux" added for "light" (ie. the enhanced light gathering abilities). In the Leica Q the lens is a Summilux even it is a f/1.7 and not f/1.4.

Leica = A compound word derived from " (Lei)tz" and "(ca)mera". Apparently they were originally going to use "LECA", but another camera company already used a similar name in France, so they inserted the 'i' to prevent any confusion.

Lens - A piece of glass or similarly transparent material (like water or plastic). It has a shape so that it can direct light rays. The word “Lens” is used both for single piece of glass as well as a camera lens with several lenses that works together. From ‘lentil’ because similar in shape.

Lens hood = A tube or ring attached to the front of a camera lens to prevent unwanted light from reaching the lens and sensor. ORIGIN Old English hod; related to Dutch hoed, German Hut 'hat,' also to hat.

Light = Tiny particles called photons that behaves like both waves and particles. Light makes objects visible by reflecting off of them, and in photography that reflecting off of subjects is what creates textures, shapes, colors and luminance. Light in its natural form (emanating from the sun) also gives life to plants and living things, and makes (most) people happier. So far, nobody has been able to determine exactly what light is. The word photography means “writing with light” (photo = light, -graphy = writing). Read more about light in my book Finding the Magic of Light.

Live View = This is the ability to see the image the sensor see, live, via the screen, or via an electronic viewfinder (EVF).

MACRO = Macro lens. The Leica 60mm APO-Elmarit-Macro ASPH f/2.8 is both a 60mm lens for portraits, landscapes, etc. as well as a near focus macro. The word macro comes from Greek makros ‘long, large.’

 

The word macro comes from Greek makros ‘long, large.’ The Leica 60mm APO-Elmarit-Macro ASPH f/2.9 is both a 60mm lens for portraits, landscapes, etc as well as a near focus macro. © Thorsten Overgaard.
The word macro comes from Greek makros ‘long, large.’ © Thorsten Overgaard.

 

Maestro II - A processor developed first as Maestro for the Leica S2 and upgraded to Maestro II for the Leica S (Typ 007). The Leica M10 has a Mestro II (and the Leica Q a Maestro II Q-edition) processor developed by SocioNext Inc. based on Fujitsu's Mibeault architecture.

mm = millimeter(s), as in a 50mm lens. (Earlier in lens history lenses focal length was given in cm = centimeters; as in a 5 cm lens). For anyone used to centimeters and millimeters, it’s no wonder. But if you grew up with inches, feet and yards, you may have had a hard time grasping what a 50mm lens was. But as lenses were designed first in Europe, the metric system with centimeters and millimeters was used to describe lenses.
The reason a 50mm lens is a 50mm lens is that there is 50mm from the focus plane (the film or sensor) to the center of focus inside the lens. When photography was a young subject, it was engineers who made it all, and the users were expected to understand. The engineers were so into the making of the lenses, that it apparently never dawned upon them that today’s users would think of a 21mm lens as a wide angle lens rather than a lens where there is 21mm from the sensor to the center of focus inside the optics.

Optic = Eye or vision. From French optique or medieval Latin opticus, from Greek optikos, from optos ‘seen.’

Perspective - The way objects appear to the eye; their relative position and distance. Also, selective focus (foreground and background out of focus) can change the perception of perspective (also see Three-dimensional). A wide angle “widens” the perspective and makes objects further away appear smaller than they are to the eye, and objects nearer, relatively larger than they are to the eye. A tele lens will “flatten” the perspective and often objects further away will appear relatively larger than nearer objects, compared to sizes in real life. A 50mm lens is the one closest to the perspective and enlargement ratio of the human eye.

Perspective is relative position and distance. As here where the girl in front is more than two times taller than the peoplle walking, and 8 times taller than the people in the far background. Also, the parts of the buildings closer to the viewer are "taller" than the parts of the same building further away. Late afternoon sun in Denmark. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
Perspective is relative position and distance. As here where the girl in front is more than two times taller than the peoplle walking, and 8 times taller than the people in the far background. Also, the parts of the buildings closer to the viewer are "taller" than the parts of the same building further away. Late afternoon sun in Denmark. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

S = Single image. In the menu of the Leica TL2 you can choose between single image at the time, or Continuous where the Leica TL2 will shoot series of 20-29 pictures per second as long as you hold down the shutter release. In Single mode it takes only one photo, no matter how long you hold down the shutter release.

SDC = Software Distortion Correction. A correction of lens distortion (not straight lines) applied in the camera and which is part of the DNG file. In Lightroom the SDC of the camera file is applied automatically (and cannot be removed), in software like AccuRaw one can open the DNG file without the SDC correction. Sean Reid reviews have written a good article on what SDC is and does in "Software Distortion Correction".

SDC (Software Distortion Correction): In Lightroom the correction profile for the Fujinon 23mm is applied automatically and cannot be turned off. If you go into Develop mode in Lightroom and look under Lens Correction > Profile, you will see a message in the bottom with an exclamation mark. When you click on that, you get the message above.
SDC (Software Distortion Correction): In Lightroom the correction profile for the Fujinon 23mm is applied automatically and cannot be turned off.
 If you go into Develop mode in Lightroom and look under Lens Correction > Profile, you will see a message in the bottom with an exclamation mark. When you click on that, you get the message above.

Sensor = A device that detects a physical property (like light) and records it. A camera sensor is a plane plate with thousands of small “eyes” with a lens in front of each, which each individually records the amount of red, green and blue light rays that comes through the lens. together Red, Green and Blue form all colors of the spectrum. From Latin sens- ‘perceived’

Saturation: How colorful, intense or pure the color is. Less saturation would be less colorful, more saturation would be more colorful. In today’s photography, desaturating a photo on the computer will gradually make it less and less colorful; and full desaturation would make it into a black and white photo.

Sharpness - See “Focus”

SLR = Abbreviation for Single-Lens Reflex; the lens that forms the image on the film/sensor also provides the image in the viewfinder via a mirror. The Leica Q has no traditional viewfinder and no mirror. the image seen in the EVF is what the sensor sees.

Summilux = Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f1.4 , "-lux" added for "light" (ie. the enhanced light gathering abilities). In Leica terminology a Summilux is always a f/1.4 lens and a Summicron is a f/2.0 lens.

Three-dimensional = Having the three dimensions of height, width and depth. In photography and lens design, three-dimensional effect is also the perception of even small micro-details; the texture of skin can appear flat and dead or three-dimensional and alive. Also, selective focus (foreground and background out of focus) can change the perception of depth. Also see Perspective.

Three-dimensional = Having the three dimensions of height, width and depth. Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.
Three-dimensional = Having the three dimensions of height, width and depth. Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. Leica TL2 with Leica 35mm Summilux-TL ASPH f/1.4. © 2017 Thorsten Overgaard.

 

 

 

Leica M10 Reviews:

The "Viewfinder" issue contains user report by Jono Slack, interview on the Leica M10 with Leica Camera AG Global Manager Stefan Daniel and Leica M10 Product Manager Jesko Oeynhausen, and more. Sign up for a print membership or digital membership at lhsa.org (Leica Historial Society International).
The "Viewfinder" issue contains user report by Jono Slack, interview on the Leica M10 with Leica Camera AG Global Manager Stefan Daniel and Leica M10 Product Manager Jesko Oeynhausen, and more. Sign up for a print membership or digital membership at lhsa.org (Leica Historial Society International).

 

Enche Tjin: "Interview with Stefan Daniel and Jesko Neuhausen on M10" (as of January 29, 2017)
Sean Reid: "Black & White Comparison of Leica M10, M240 and M246"
(as of January 28, 2017)
Sean Reid: "Color Studio Comparison Tests of Leica M10, M240 and SL"
(as of January 22, 2017)
Chromasoft: "Leica M10 raw file (DNG) analysis"
(as on January 21, 2017)
Erwin Puts: "Leica M10, 2,000 hours"
(as of January 20, 2017)
Steve Huff: "Leica M10 higher ISO tests vs Sony A7RII, Leica SL"
(as of January 20,2017)
Jonathan Slack: User Report Leica M10
(at L-User-Forum as of January 18, 2017)
Jonathan Slack: User Report Leica M10 (at LHSA as of January 18, 2017)
Steve Huff: The Leica M10 is Here!
(as of January 19, 2017)
RedDotForum.com
(as of January 18, 2017)
Sean Reid: Reidreviews
(as of January 18, 2017)
DP Review: The M U want: Leica M10 First Impressions Review and Samples (as of January 18, 2017)
DP Review: Leica Boss: Hands-on with new Leica M10 (as of January 18, 2017)
Thephoblographer.com: Review of M 10 (as of January 18, 2017)
Mirorless Comparison: "The 10 Main Differences Between the Leica M10 and M240" (Jan 18, 2017)
Amateur Photographer: Leica M 10 Hands On First Look (as of January 18, 2017)
INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: Leica M10 (as of January 18, 2017)
Techcrunch Stefan Etienne: "Leica M10 more artisan than professional" (as of Feb 6, 2017)
Street Silhouettes: "An Inquiry into Digital versus Film - The M10 vs M9 vs M6" (March 2017)
John Barbiaux: "Street Photographers Review of Leica M10" (as of July 3, 2017)


Leica M 10 Video Reviews:

The Phoblographer: Stafan Daniel talks about the Leica M 10 (as of January 18, 2017)
Amateur Photographer: Leica M 10 Hands On First Look (as of January 18, 2017)
Steve Huff: The Leica M10 video review (as of January 19, 2017)
DP Review: "Leica M 10 Hands On" (as of January 19, 2017)
Matt Stuart - "Exploring Brussels with the Leica M 10" (as of January 19, 2017)
Kai W: "Leica M10 Hands-on Preview" (as of January 19, 2017)
Matt Granger: Leica M10 (as of January 19, 2017)
Red35 Photography: "The Leica M10" (as of February 1, 2017)
The Verge: "Leica M10 Review" (as of February 17, 2017)
Thorsten von Overgaard/Magic of Light Television: "Leica M10 Introduction Review PART 1"
Thorsten von Overgaard/Magic of Light Television: "Leica M10 Review Part II":


 

 

 

Limited time offer for my readers from Serge Ramelli:
Serge Ramelli Landscape Masterclass
When Serge Ramelli attended my workshop we spoke about letting my readers have some of his courses in Lightroom at special prices. This is the first one. Simply click on the link and use the code: THORSTEN to get 60% off the price.

 

 

 

Index of Thorsten von Overgaard's user review pages covering Leica M9, Leica M9-P, M-E, Leica M10,
Leica M 240, Leica M-D 262, Leica M Monochrom, M 246  as well as Leica Q and Leica SL:

Leica M9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20   M9-P
Leica M10
V 1 2 3 4                               M10-P
Leica M 240
P 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44         What if?
Leica M-D 262 1 2                        
Leica Monochrom 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
A
29
B
29
C
29
D
               
Leica Q 1         Leica TL2: 1 2              
Leica SL 1 2 3 4 5   Leica CL: 1 2             Books

 

 
 

 

 

   
   

 

– Thorsten Overgaard
#1788-0818

   


leica.overgaard.dk
Thorsten Overgaard's Leica Article Index
Leica M cameras:   Small Leica cameras:
Leica M10   Leica Q full-frame mirrorless
Leica M10-P   Leica CL
Leica M Type 240 and M-P Typ240   Leica TL2
Leica M-D Typ 262 and Leica M60   Leica Digilux 2 vintage digital rangefinder
Leica M Monochrom Typ246 digital rangefinder   Leica Digilux 1
Leica M Monochrom MM digital rangefinder   Leica Sofort instant camera
Leica M9 and Leica M-E digital rangefinder   Leica Minilux 35mm film camera
Leica M9-Professional digital rangefinder   Leica CM 35mm film camera
Leica M4 35mm film rangefinder    
     
Leica M lenses:   Leica SLR cameras:
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica SL 2015 Type 601 mirrorless fullframe
Leica 21mm Leica Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4   Leica R8/R9/DMR film & digital 35mm dSLR cameras
Leica 21mm Super-Angulon-M f/3.4   Leica R10 [cancelled]
Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4   Leica R4 35mm film SLR
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH FLE f/1.4 and f/1.4 AA   Leica R3 electronic 35mm film SLR
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leicaflex SL/SL mot 35mm film SLR
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95    
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0 and f/1.2   Leica SL and TL lenses:
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f//1.4    
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0    
Leitz 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0 "rigid" Series II   Leica R lenses:
Leica 75mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/1.25   Leica 19mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4   Leica 35mm Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica 75mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 50mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leica 90mm APO-Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0   Leica 60mm Macro-Elmarit f/2.8
Leica 90mm Summarit-M f/2.5   Leica 80mm Summilux-F f/1.4
Leica 90mm Elmarit f/2.8   Leica 90mm Summicron-R f/2.0
Leitz 90mm Thambar f/2.2   Leica 180mm R lenses
    Leica 400mm Telyt-R f/6.8
Leica Cine Lenses:   Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica Cine lenses from CW Sonderoptic   Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/4.0
     
     
History and overview:   Leica S:
Leica History   Leica S1 digital scan camera
Leica Definitions   Leica S2 digital medium format
Leica Lens Compendium   Leica S digital medium format
Leica Camera Compendium    
The Solms factory and Leica Wetzlar Campus   "Magic of Light" Television Channel
    Thorsten von Overgaard YouTube Channel
     
Photography Knowledge   Thorsten Overgaard books and education:
Calibrating computer screen for photographers   Thorsten Overgaard Masterclasses & Workshops
Which Computer for Photographers?   Lightroom Survival Kit (Classic)
What is Copyright? Advice for Photogarphers   Lightroom Presets
Synchronizing Large Photo Archive with iPhone   Capture One Survival Kit
Quality of Light   "Finding the Magic of Light" eBook (English)
Lightmeters   "Die Magie des Lichts Finden" eBook (German)
Color meters for accurate colors (White Balance)   "The Moment of Impact in Photography" eBook
White Balance & WhiBal   "Freedom of Photographic Expression" eBook
Film in Digital Age   "Composition in Photography" eBook
Dodge and Burn   "A Little Book on Photography" eBook
All You Need is Love   "After the Tsunami" Free eBook
How to shoot Rock'n'Roll   The Overgaard New Inspiration Extension Course I
X-Rite   The Overgaard Photography Extension Course
The Origin of Photography    
Hasselblad/Imacon Flextight 35mm and 6x6 scanner   Leica M9 Masterclass (video course)
Leica OSX folder icons   Leica M10 Masterclass (video course)
    Leica M240 Masterclass (video course)
    Leica Q Masterclass (video course)
Bespoke Camera Bags by Thorsten Overgaard:   Leica TL2 Quick Start (video course)
"The Von" travel camera bag   Street Photography Masterclass (video course)
"Messenger" walkabout bag    
"24hr Bag" travel bag   Thorsten von Overgaard oin Amazon:
"The Von Backup" camera backpack   "Finding the Magic of Light"
     
     
Leica Photographers:    
Jan Grarup   Riccis Valladares
Henri Cartier-Bresson   Christopher Tribble
Birgit Krippner   Martin Munkácsi
John Botte   Jose Galhoz
 
Douglas Herr   Milan Swolf
Vivian Maier  
Morten Albek    
Byron Prukston   Richard Avedon
     
The Story Behind That Picture:   Thorsten Overgaard on Instagram
More than 200 articles by Thorsten Overgaard   Join the Thorsten Overgaard Mailing List
Thorsten Overgaard Workshop Schedule   Thorsten Overgaard on Twitter
    Thorsten Overgaard on Facebook
Leica Forums and Blogs:    
Leica M10 / M240 / M246 User Forum on Facebook   Heinz Richter's Leica Barnack Berek Blog
Jono Slack   Leica Camera AG
Steve Huff Photos (reviews)   Leica Fotopark
Erwin Puts (reviews)   The Leica Pool on Flickr
LeicaRumors.com (blog)   Eric Kim (blog)
Luminous Landscape (reviews)   Adam Marelli (blog)
Sean Reid Review (reviews)   The Leica User Forum
Ken Rockwell (reviews)   Shoot Tokyo (blog)
John Thawley (blog)   I-Shot-It photo competition
     
 
 
The Von Overgaard Gallery Store:    
Hardware for Photography   Von Overgaard Ventilated lens shades:
Bespoke Camera Bags and Luxury Travel Bags   Ventilated Shade for Current 35mm Summilux FLE
Software for Photography   Ventilated Shade E46 for old Leica 35mm/1.4 lens
Signed Prints   Ventilated Shade for Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH
Mega Size Signed Prints   Ventilated Shade E43 for older 50mm Summilux
Mega Size Signed Limited Prints   Ventilated Shade for 35mm Summicron-M ASPH
Medium Size Signed Limited Prints   Ventilated Shade for older 35mm/f2 lenses
Small Size Signed Limited Prints   Ventilated Shade E39 for 50mm Summicron lenses
Commisioning Thorsten Overgaard Worldwide   Ventilated Shade for Leica 28mm Summilux
Thorsten Overgaard Archive Licencing   Ventilated Shade for current 28mm Elmarit-M
Video Masterclasses   Ventilated Shade for older 28mm Elmarti-M
Photography Books by Thorsten Overgaard   Ventilated Shade E49 for 75mm Summicron
Home School Photography Extension Courses   ventilated Shade E55 for 90mm Summicron
Overgaard Workshops & Masterclasses   Ventilated Shade for 28mm Summaron
Artists Nights   Ventilated Shade for 24mm Elmarit
Gallery Store Specials   Ventilated Shade E60 for 50mm Noctilux and 75/1.4
 

 

Above: Classic Porsche. Leica M10 with Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH ff/0.95. © 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard.

 

Leica logo

LEItz CAmera = LEICA
Founded 1849 in Wetzlar, Germany.

 

Leica M10 Firmware Updates (link)
Leica M10 User Manual as PDF

Leica M User Forum Facebook

Download free 30 day trial of CAPTURE ONE PRO with Leica M10 support. Use Promotional Code AMBOVERGAARD for discount.

 

Join a Leica Society:

LHSA Leica Historical Society
Leica Historical Society UK
Leica Historical Society Germany
The Leica Meet

 

Leica M10-P official website

 

 

 

 

 

Thorsten von Overgaard by Markus Iofce (New York, June 2018)
Thorsten von Overgaard by Markus Iofce (New York, June 2018)

Thorsten von Overgaard is a Danish writer and photographer, specializing in portrait photography and documentary photography, known for writings about photography and as an educator. Some photos are available as signed editions via galleries or online. For specific photography needs, contact Thorsten Overgaard via e-mail.

Feel free to e-mail to thorsten@overgaard.dk for
advice, ideas or improvements.

 

 

Get your film archive scanned in 24MP:
Film Scanning and Slide Scanning in Denmark
Made in Denmark

 

 

 

Also visit:

Overgaard Photography Workshops
Von Overgaard Gallery Store
Von Overgaard Ventilated Shades
Thorsten Overgaard Books
Leica Definitions
Leica History
"Photographer For Sale"
Leica Lens Compendium
Leica Camera Compendium
Leica 21mm Super-Elmar-M ASPH f/3.4
Leica 21mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4

Leica 28mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 35mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 35mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0
Leica 50mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/0.95
Leica 50mm APO-Summicron-M f/2.0
Leica 50mm Summicron-M f/2.0
Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH f/1.4
Leica 75mm Summilux-M f/1.4
Leica 75mm Noctilux-M ASPH f/1.25
Leica 90mm Summicron-M ASPH f/2.0
Leica 35-70mm Vario-Elmarit-R f/2.8
Leica Cine lenses from CW Sonderoptic
Leica Digilux 2

Leica M10
Leica M10-P
Leica M9, M9-P and Leica ME
Leica M 240
Leica M 240 Video
Leica M 262
Leica M-D 262
Leica M Monochrom
Leica M 246 Monochrom

Leica SL full-frame mirrorless
Leica R9 and R8 SLR with digital back
Leica Q
Leica CL
Leica TL2
Leica Sofort
Leica S digital medium format
Leica X
"On The Road With von Overgaard"
Light metering
White Balance for More Beauty
Color Meters

Screen Calibration
Which computer to get
Sync'ing photo archive to iPhone
Lightroom Survival Kit 7
Capture One Survival Kit 11

The Story Behind That Picture

Von Overgaard Masterclasses:
M10 / M9 / M240 / Q / TL2 / SL

 

 

 

 

Overgaard Photo Workshops


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


     
Buy eBooks by
Thorsten Overgaard
     
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Add to Cart  

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"The Freedom of Photographic Expression"   "Composition in Photography - The Photographer as Storyteller"
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Video classes
     
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Lightroom Presets Leica M10   Lightroom Presets Leica M9
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Lightroom Presets Leica TL2   Lightroom Presets Leica Q
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Lightroom Dutch Painters Presets by Thorsten Overgaard    
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"Hollywood Film Presets"
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Leica Presets for Lightroom by Thorsten Overgaard   Leica Styles for Capture One by Thorsten Overgaard
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Join a Thorsten Overgaard
Photography Workshop

I am in constant orbit teaching
Leica and photography workshops.

Most people prefer to explore a
new place when doing my workshop.
30% of my students are women.
35% of my students dotwo or more workshops.
95% are Leica users.
Age range is from 15 to 87 years
with the majority in the 30-55 range.
Skill level ranges from two weeks
to a lifetime of experience.
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  · © Copyright 1996-2018 · Thorsten von Overgaard


 

© 1996 - 2018 Thorsten von Overgaard. All rights reserved.

 

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