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Above: The Leica Apo-Telyt-R 400mm/560mm module, the Leica Summilux-M ASPH 75mm f1.4 and the Leica Summilux-M ASPH 35mm f1.4
 
     
Leica Lens Compendium  

Latest update, July 20, 2019

 

Thanks to Justin Scott, Melbourne, Australia for the foundation of this compendium.
Additional R data courtesy of Douglas Herr of WildlightPhoto.com
Thanks for addition information from Leica Camera AG and Ken Rockwell


   

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Lens
F/
No.
Intro.
Fin.
Code
Weight
Info

 

Leica fixed prime lenses

Fixed lenses on cameras

 

Summarit (Leica Minilux) 40mm 2.4
18 009
1995
2006
     
Summarit (Leica CM) [said to have improved coating] 40mm 2.4  
2006
2007
     
Anastigmat (Leitz I) 50mm 3.5  
1920
1921
     
Elmax (Leitz I) 50mm 3.5  
1921
1925
     
Elmar (Leitz Elmar I close-focus) 50mm 3.5  
1926
1930
LEICA
   
Anastigmat (Leitz II retro) 50mm 3.5
18 010
2000
2002
     
Leica Digilux (Leica Digilux) 35mm 3.2    
2000
     
Leica Elmarit ASPH on Leica X1 (36mm equivalent ) 24mm 2.8  
2010
-
   
Leica Summilux ASPH on Leica Q Typ 116 and Leica Q2 28mm 1.7  
2015
-
   

 

Leica fixed zoom lenses

Fixed zoom lenses on cameras

 

 

           
Vario-Elmar (Leica Minilux Zoom) 35 - 70mm 3.5 - 6.5    
2006
     
Vario-Elmar (Leica CM Zoom) 35 - 70mm 3.5 - 6.5  
2006
2007
     
DC Vario-Summicron ASPH 7-21mm (Digilux 1) 33-100mm 2.0 - 2.5  
2000
2004
     
DC Vario-Summicron ASPH 7-22mm (Digilux 2) 28 - 90mm 2.0 - 2.4  
2003
2006
     
DC Vario-Elmarit ASPH 7.4 - 88.8mm (Leica V-Lux 1) 35 - 420mm 2.8 - 3.7  
2006
-
     
DC Vario-Elmarit ASPH 6.3 - 25.2 mm (Leica D-Lux 2) 28 - 110mm 2.8 4.9            
DC Vario-Elmarit ASPH 6.3 - 25.2mm(Leica D-Lux 3) 28 - 110mm 2.8 - 4.9  
2007
-
     
DC Vario-Elmarit ASPH 4.6 - 16.8mm (Leica C-Lux 1) 28 - 102mm 2.8 - 5.6  
2003
2006
     
DC Vario-Elmarit ASPH 4.6 - 16.8mm (Leica C-Lux 2) 28 - 102mm 2.8 - 5.6  
2005
-
     

 

 

Leica Screw Mount Lenses "M39" "LMT"

Screw-thread lenses for Leica II, 250FF, III, 250GG, IIIa, IIIb, IIIc, IIc, Ic, IIIf, If, IIf, If, IIIg, Ig
(most are compatible with Leica M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M8, M9, ME and Leica M Type 240 with an adaptor)

 

Super-Angulon (Schneider) 21mm 4.0  
1958
1963
SUOON
   
Hektor (chrome) 28mm 6.3  
1935
1945
HOOPY
   
Hektor (nickel) 28mm 6.3  
1935
1945
HOOPY
   
Hektor (chrome) 28mm 6.3  
1946
1955
HOOPY
   
Summaron 28mm 5.6  
1955
1963
SNOOX
   
Elmar (nickel heavy cam) 35mm 3.5  
1930
1931
EKURZ
   
Elmar (nickel) 35mm 3.5  
1931
1933
EKURZ
   
Elmar (chrome) 35mm 3.5  
1933
1945
EKURZ
   
Elmar (chrome post-war) 35mm 3.5  
1946
1950
EKURZ
   
Summaron A36 35mm 3.5  
1948
1960
SOONC
   
Summaron E39 35mm 3.5  
1956
1960
SOONC
   
Summaron 35mm 2.8  
1958
1963
SIMOO
   
Summicron (I) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 35mm 2.0
11 008
1958
1963
SAWOO
 
Hektor (nickel) <100,000 50mm 2.5  
1930
1930
HEKTO
   
Elmar 50mm 3.5  
1930
1930
LEICA
   
Hektor (nickel) 50mm 2.5  
1931
1933
HEKTO
   
Elmar nickel 50mm 3.5  
1931
1936
ELMAR
   
Hektor (chrome) 50mm 2.5  
1933
1936
HEKTO
   
Summar (chrome rigid) 50mm 2.0  
1933
1940
SUMAR
   
Summar (chrome) 50mm 2.0  
1933
1940
SUMAR
   
Summar (nickel rigid) 50mm 2.0  
1933
1940
SUMAR
   
Summar (nickel) 50mm 2.0  
1933
1940
SUMAR
   
Elmar chrome A36 uncoated 50mm 3.5  
1933
1945
ELMAR
   
Xenon (Schneider) 50mm 1.5  
1936
1950
XEMOO
   
Xenon (Schneider) Taylor-Hobson 50mm 1.5  
1936
1950
XEMOO
   
Summitar < 600,000 50mm 2.0  
1939
1945
SOORE
   
Elmar chrome A36 post-war 50mm 3.5  
1946
1951
ELMAR
   
Summitar > 600,000 50mm 2.0  
1946
1955
SOORE
   
Summarit 50mm 1.5  
1949
1960
SOOIA
   
Summitar * 50mm 2.0  
1950
1950
SOORE
   
Elmar "red scale" 50mm 3.5  
1951
1959
ELMAR
   
Summicron (collapsible) < 1,000,000 50mm 2.0  
1953
1953
SOOIC
   
Summicron (collapsible) 50mm 2.0  
1954
1960
SOOIC
   
Summicron (II) (rigid) 50mm 2.0  
1956
1963
SOOIC
   
Elmar 50mm 2.8  
1957
1962
ELMOO
   
Summicron (II) Compur 50mm 2.0  
1959
1959
SOOIC
   
Summilux (I) 50mm 1.4  
1960
1963
SOOME
   
Hektor (all black) 73mm 1.9  
1931
1946
HEGRA
   
Hektor 73mm 1.9  
1933
1946
HEGRA
   
Summarex (black) 85mm 1.5  
1948
1960
SOOCX
   
Summarex (chrome) 85mm 1.5  
1948
1960
SOOCX
   
Elmar (un-coupled) fas 90mm 4.0  
1930
1930
ELANG
   
Elmar (thick < 100,000) "Thick Niner" 90mm 4.0  
1931
1931
ELANG
   
Elmar (thick coupled) "Thick Niner" 90mm 4.0  
1931
1931
ELANG
   
Elmar (black nickel) "Thin Niner" 90mm 4.0  
1933
1933
ELANG
   
Elmar (black) "Thin Niner" 90mm 4.0  
1933
1945
ELANG
   
Thambar  90mm 2.2  
1935
1939
TOODY
 
Elmar (all chrome) 90mm 4.0  
1946
1947
ELANG
   
Elmar (chrome A36) 90mm 4.0  
1947
1954
ELANG
   
Elmar (chrome E39) 90mm 4.0  
1954
1964
ELANG
   
Summicron (I) removable lens-hood [Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0  
1957
1959
SOOZI
   
Summicron (I) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0  
1959
1962
SEOOF
   
Elmarit 90mm 2.8
11 029
1959
1963
ELRIT
   
Elmar (3 element) 90mm 4.0  
1964
1964
ELANG
   
Elmar (black) 105mm 6.3  
1932
1937
ELZEN
   
Elmar (chrome) 105mm 6.3  
1933
1937
ELZEN
   
Elmar 135mm 4.5  
1931
1936
EFERN
   
Hektor (black) 135mm 4.5  
1933
1945
HEFAR
   
Hektor A36 135mm 4.5  
1946
1954
HEFAR
   
Hektor E39 135mm 4.5  
1954
1960
HEFAR
   
Elmar 135mm 4.0
11 750
1960
1964
     

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Leica M lenses

M Bayonet-mount lenses for Leica
Leica M1, Leica M2, Leica M2R, Leica M3, Leica M4, Leica M4-2, Leica M4-P, Leica M5, Leica MD, Leica MDa, Leica MD-2, Leica CL, Minolta CL, Leica M6, Leica M6 TTL, Leica M7, Leica MP, Leica M-A
Digital rangefinders: Leica M8, Leica M8.2, Leica M9, Leica M9-P, Leica M-E, Leica M Monochrom, Leica M Type 240, Leica M-P Typ240, Leica M 246 Monochrom, Leica M 262, Leica M Edition 60, Leica M-D 262, Leica M10, Leica M10-P, Leica M10-D, Leica M10-R, Leica M10 Monochrom

The lenses marked with 6* are the lenses that can be updated with 6-bit code. Contact Leica Camera AG Customer Care for price and shipping.

Hologon (Zeiss) 15mm 8.0
11 003
1972
1976
     
Super-Elmar-M ASPH 18mm 3.8
11 649
2009
2020
     
Super-Angulon (Schneider) 21mm 4.0
11 102
1958
1963
SUMOM
   
Super-Angulon chrome (Schneider, designer Werner Wagner) 21mm 3.4
11 103
1963
1967
   
Super-Angulon black (Schneide, designer Werner Wagnerr) 21mm 3.4
11 103
1968
1980
   
Elmarit-M [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 21mm 2.8
11 134
1980
1997
   
6*
Elmarit-M ASPH black 21mm 2.8
11 135
1997
2011
   
PDF 6*
Elmarit-M ASPH silver 21mm 2.8
11 897
1997
2004
   
PDF 6*
Summilux-M ASPH (design by Peter Karbe) 21mm 1.4  
2008
-
   
Super-Elmar-M ASPH (design by Peter Karbe) 21mm 3.4  
2011
-
   
Tri-Elmar-M ASPH 16/18/21mm 4.0
?
2006
-
   
Elmarit-M ASPH black 24mm 2.8
11 878
1998
-
   
PDF 6*
Elmarit-M ASPH silver 24mm 2.8
11 898
1996
2005
   
PDF 6*
Summilux-M ASPH (design by Peter Karbe) 24mm 1.4  
2008
-
     
Elmar-M ASPH (design by Peter Karbe) 24mm 3.8
11 648
2008
2020
   
Elmarit (I) 28mm 2.8
11 801
1965
1969
     
Elmarit (II) 28mm 2.8
11 801
1972
1980
     
Elmarit-M (III) 28mm 2.8
11 804
1979
1993
   
PDF 6*
Elmarit-M (IV) 28mm 2.8
11 809
1992
2006
   
PDF 6*
Tri-Elmar-M ASPH black 28/35/50mm 4.0
11 890
1998
2007
   
PDF 6*
Tri-Elmar-M ASPH silver 28/35/50mm 4.0
11 894
1999
2000
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M ASPH Version I black 28mm 2.0
11 604
2000
2018
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M ASPH silver anodized alu (limited production 500 pcs) 28mm 2.0
11 661
2008
2008
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M ASPH Version II black. Updated optical design with improvements for digital use (coatings and higher resution power). 28mm 2.0
11 672
2018
-
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M ASPH sepia brown limited edition Lenny Kravitz.
Made for the "Drifter" limited adition set (125 pcs made) of Leica M 246 Monochrom, 28mm Summicron and 75mm APO-Summicron. Camera and lenses all in sepia brown with brass details.
28mm 2.0  
2019
2019
     
Summicron-M ASPH Safari Green (250 pcs made) 28mm 2.0
11 704
2020
2020
     
Elmarit-M ASPH 28mm 2.8
?
2006
-
   
PDF 6*
Summilux-M ASPH stainless steel limited anniversary edition
Limited production of 101 pcs to go with a Leica M-A film camera and M Monochrom camera in celebration of the Leica 100 year anniversary. The set with two cameras and three lenses (28mm, 35mm and 50mm Summilux lenses) is all in stainless steel.
28mm 1.4  
2014
2014
   
Summilux-M ASPH black 28mm 1.4
11 668
2015
-
   
Summilux-M ASPH silver limited edition in 300 pcs. 28mm 1.4
11 911
2019
2019
   
Summaron-M chrome brass
(Remake of the 1955-1963 screw mount version)
28mm 5.6
11 695
2016
-
     
Summaron-M matte black
(Matte black version of the 2016 remake of the 1955-1963 screw mount version, now with M-mount. First as Japan limited edition in only 50 pcs in 2018 (numbered 01/50 etc serials on front), then made as a Leica worldwide limited edition in 2019 in 500 pcs)
28mm 5.6
11 928
2019
2019
     
Summaron 35mm 3.5  
1956
1960
SOONC
   
Summaron ASPH (prototype) 35mm 2.8  
1958
1958
     
Summicron (I) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 35mm 2.0
11 308
1958
1969
SAWOM
 
Summicron (I) black 35mm 2.8
11 308
1958
1969
SAWOM
   
Summaron 35mm 2.8  
1958
1974
SIMOM
   
Summilux (I) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 35mm 1.4
11 869
1961
1966
   
Summilux (II) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 35mm 1.4
11 870
1966
1995
   
Summicron (II) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 35mm 2.0
11 309
1969
1971
   
Summicron (III) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 35mm 2.0
11 309
1971
1979
   
Summicron-M (IV) black [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
Version 4, also knowns as "King of Bokeh". German/Canada vers. Serial 2974251 to 3880946. 10 aperture blades.
Exists with Yellow /white and red /white focusing scale.
35mm 2.0
11 310
1979
1997(9)
 
160g
Summicron-M (IV) silver [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
Version 4, also knowns as "King of Bokeh". German/Canada vers. Serial 2974251 to 3880946. 10 aperture blades. Approximately 10% of existing lenses was made in silver.
35mm 2.0
11 311
1993
1997(9)
 
260g
Summilux-M Aspherical (III) 35mm 1.4
11 873
1990
1994
   
Summilux-M ASPH (IV) black 35mm 1.4
11 874
1994
2011
 
250g
Summilux-M ASPH (IV) silver 35mm 1.4
11 883
1994
2004
 
415g
Summicron-M ASPH black 35mm 2.0
11 879
1996
-
 
255g
Summicron-M ASPH silver 35mm 2.0
11 882
1996
-
 
340g
Summarit-M 35mm 2.5  
2007
2015
     
Summarit-M 35mm 2.4  
2015
2020
     
Summilux-M ASPH (V) FLE FLoating Elements [by Peter Karbe] 35mm 1.4  
2010
-
   
Summilux-M ASPH Titanium (V)  FLE limited edition with M9 Titanium,  500 pcs. only, [Peter Karbe & Walter de'Silva] 35mm 1.4  
2010
2010
   
Summilux-M ASPH (V) FLE stainless steel limited anniversary edition
Limited production of 101 pcs to go with a Leica M-A film camera and M Monochrom camera in celebration of the Leica 100 year anniversary. The set with two cameras and three lenses (28mm, 35mm and 50mm Summilux lenses) is all in stainless steel.
35mm 1.4  
2014
2014
   
Elmarit-C 40mm 2.8
11 541
1973
1973
     
Summicron-C 40mm 2.0
11 542
1973
1977
     
Elmar E39 50mm 3.5
11 610
1954
1961
ELMAM
   
Summicron (II) Rigid [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 2.0  
1956
1968
SOSIC
 
Summicron "DS" (II) 50mm 2.0  
1956
1968
SOMNI
   
Elmar 50mm 2.8  
1958
1966
ELMOM
   
Summilux (I) 50mm 1.4  
1959
1961
SOOME
   
Summicron (II) black 50mm 2.0  
1960
1968
SOSIC
   
Summilux (II) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 1.4
11 113
11 114
1962
1992
 
360g
 
Summilux (III) black [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 1.4
11 868
1992
2004
 
275g
6*
Summilux (III) silver [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 1.4
11 856
1992
2004
 
380g
6*
Noctilux (prototype, used for x-ray) 50mm 0.75
 
Noctilux black 50mm 1.2
11 820
1966
1975
 
470g
Noctilux silver (prototype) 50mm 1.2  
1966
1966
   
ELCAN Summicron. 460 pcs. was made for the military Leica KE-7A and another 55 sold to the public. 50mm 2.0
276
1969
1974
   
ELCAN Summicron collapsible. Prototype. 50mm 2.0
C276
1969
1969
   
Summicron (III) 50mm 2.0
11 817
1969
1979
   
6*
Noctilux-M [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 1.0
11 821
1976
1993
 
580g
Noctilux-M [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] built-in hood 50mm 1.0
11 822
1994
2008
 
630g
Summicron-M (IV) black [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 2.0
11 819
11 826
1979/84
1994
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M (IV) silver [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 2.0
11 825
1992
1994
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M (IV) silver [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 50mm 2.0
11 816
1994
2007
   
PDF 6*
Elmar-M (collapsible) black 50mm 2.8
11 831
1995
2007
   
PDF 6*
Elmar-M (collapsible) silver 50mm 2.8
11 823
1994
2007
   
PDF 6*
Summicron-M "50 Jahre SUMMICRON" chrome (lens design is the same as 1979-model "11 826", the lens body is chrome with silver in classic design; but without the locking mechanism at infinity) 50mm 2.0
11 615
2003
2003
   
1,000 made
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH (design by Peter Karbe) black 50mm 1.4
11 891
2004
-
 
335g
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH (design by Peter Karbe) silver 50mm 1.4
11 892
2004
-
 
460g
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH LHSA Silver (design by Peter Karbe)
Silver limited LHSA edition in 1959 barrel design made of brass.
50mm 1.4
11 628
2005
2005
   
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH LHSA Black (design by Peter Karbe)
Black Paint limited LHSA edition in 1959 barrel design made of brass with ventilated hood in brass black paint (part no 12 586).
50mm 1.4
11 627
2005
2005
   
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH stainless steel limited anniversary edition
Limited production of 101 pcs to go with a Leica M-A film camera and M Monochrom camera in celebration of the Leica 100 year anniversary. The set with two cameras and three lenses (28mm, 35mm and 50mm Summilux lenses) is all in stainless steel.
50mm 1.4  
2014
2014
   
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH Black Paint Brassed Lenny Kravitz
(design by Peter Karbe)
Black limited edition in 1959 barrel design as part of the Lenny Kravitz "reporter" set delivered in a suitcase with M240 black paint camera. All parts brassed and then added a clear lacquer.
50mm 1.4  
2015
2015
   
(APO-) Summilux-M ASPH Black Chrome (design by Peter Karbe)
Black edition made of brass in 1959 barrel design, with bass clip-on hood. 500 pcs made, serial 4316136 to 4317002.
50mm 1.4
11 688
2015
2015
   
Summarit-M 50mm 2.5  
2007
2015
     
Summarit-M 50mm 2.4  
2015
2020
     
Noctilux-M ASPH black (design by Peter Karbe) 50mm 0.95  
2008
-
   
Noctilux-M ASPH silver (design by Peter Karbe).
20 pcs. Limited Edition celebrating Leica Shop Vienna 20 year anniversary on June 16, 2011. Sold as set with either the Leica M9-P in silver or the Leica M3-P (another 20 screw-trad were made for this) film camera in silver.
50mm 0.95  
2011
2011
 
700 g
Noctilux-M ASPH silver (design by Peter Karbe).
50 pcs. Limited Edition celebrating Leica Store Ginza Tokyo anniversary in March 2012. Sold as set with the limited edition white Leica M9-P in silver.
50mm 0.95  
2012
2012
   
Noctilux-M ASPH silver Hermes Limited Edition set
Lens design by Peter Karbe, lens and camera body re-design by Walter de'Silva.
This is a redesign of the lens barrel texture, in anodized silver and with Hermes orange numbers. Body re-design in silver chrome finish with Veau Swift burnt tan calfskin leather. Only available in 100 pcs. limited set of Leica M9-P Hermes Limited Edition Jean-Louis Dumas  with three lenses; 50mm Noctilux, 50mm Summilux and 28mm Summicron. Also with a limited edition Hermes Camera Bag.
Price for the set at the release date May 10, 2012 - delivery July 2012- was € 40,000 / $ 50,000 for the set.
Another 300 sets Leica M9-P Hermes Limited Edition with the Leica 50mm Summilux-M ASPH Hermes Limited Edition was released as well, price € 20,000 / 25,000$.
28mm (100 pcs)
50mm (100 pcs)
50mm (400 pcs)
2.0
0.95
1.4
 
2012
2012
   
APO-Summicron-M ASPH "The Wolds Best 50mm" 50mm 2.0  
2012
     
Noctilux-M ASPH "heritage"
Remake of the 1966-model, the first Noctilux which was the 50mm Noctilux f/1.2 ASPH. This is an exact remake optically and mechanically, but using current available glass recipe, and implementing an E49 filter tread and a clip-on ventilated shade.
Black version is unlimited edition whereas the Chrome version is limited to 100 pcs and is more expensive (Chrome version was only made as a prototype in 1966).
50mm 1.2

Black
11 686

Chrome
11 702

2021

2021

-

2021

 

Black
405g

Chrome
598g

Noctilux ASPH (prototype, prep for the 50/1.2 1966 model) 52mm 1.0  
1959
1959
   
ELCAN (prototype for x-ray photography) 65mm 0.75            
ELCAN-M (produced for the US millietary) 66mm 2.0  
1964
1964
   
Summar "Noctilux" (prototype attached to Leica M3) 75mm 0.85  
?
     
Leitz Summilux-M [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
60mm filters, 490g, bayonet hood 12 539. Same optics 1980-2007.
75mm 1.4
11 814
1980
1982
 
490g
6*
Leitz Summilux-M [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
60mm filters, 560g, built-in hood. Same optics 1980-2007.
75mm 1.4
11 815
1982
1998
 
560g
PDF 6*
Leica Summilux-M [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
60mm filters, 560g, built-in hood. Same optics 1980-2007.
Inscription on 75mm Summilux lenses:
LEICA LENS MADE IN CANADA XXXXXXX
LEITZ SUMMILUX-M from serial no 325XXXX
LEICA SUMMILUX-M from serial no (?) (The information elsewhere that the Leica inscription begins at serial no 395XXXX is wrong, it starts earlier).
75mm 1.4
11 810
1998
2007
 
560g
PDF 6*
Leica Noctilux-M ASPH [Lens design by Peter Karbe]
67 mm filters, built-in lens hood.
75mm 1.25
11 676
2018
-
 
1055g
APO-Summicron-M ASPH Black (design by Peter Karbe) 75mm 2.0
11 637
2005
-
   
PDF 6*
APO-Summicron-M ASPH Silver (design by Peter Karbe) (250 pcs made) 75mm 2.0
11 701
2020
2020
   
PDF 6*
APO-Summicron-M ASPH sepia brown limited edition Lenny Kravitz.
Made for the "Drifter" limited adition set (125 pcs made) of Leica M 246 Monochrom, 28mm Summicron and 75mm APO-Summicron. Camera and lenses all in sepia brown with brass details.
75mm 2.0  
2019
2019
     
Summarit-M 75mm 2.5  
2007
2015
     
Summarit-M 75mm 2.4  
2015
2020
     
ELCAN-M (produced for the US millietary by Leitz Canada) 90mm 1.0  
1965
1965
   
Elmar (rigid) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 4.0
11 830
1954
1963
ELGAM
 
Elmar (collapsible) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 4.0
11 631
1954
1968
ILNOO
 
Summicron (I) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0  
1957
1959
SOOZI
 
Elmarit [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.8  
1959
1974
ELRIM
 
Summicron (II) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0  
1959
1979
SEOOM
 
Elmar (3 element) 90mm 4.0
11 830
1964
1968
   
Tele-Elmarit (I) black [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.8
11 800
1964
1974
   
Tele-Elmarit (I) chrome [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.8
11 800
1964
1974
   
Elmar-C 90mm 4.0
11 540
1973
1977
   
Tele-Elmarit (II) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.8
11 800
1974
1990
   
Summicron-M (III) black [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0
11 136
1980
1998
   
Summicron-M (III) silver [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0
11 137
1993
1998
   
Elmarit-M black 90mm 2.8
11 807
1990
2007
   
Elmarit-M silver 90mm 2.8
11 808
1990
2007
   
APO-Summicron-M ASPH black 90mm 2.0
11 884
1998
-
   
APO-Summicron-M ASPH silver 90mm 2.0
11 885
2002
2004
   
APO-Summicron-M ASPH Safari green (250 pcs made) 90mm 2.0
11 705
2020
2020
   
Summilux-M ASPH black (E67 filter) 90mm 1.5
11 678
2019
-
 
1010g
Macro-Elmar-M black (collapsible)
Set with Macro-Adapter M 14 409 black + angle viewfinder 12 531 + lens shade 12 575 (black)
90mm 4.0
11 633
2002
2007
 
223g
Macro-Elmar-M silver (collapsible)
Set with Macro-Adapter M 14 409 black + angle viewfinder 12 531
90mm 4.0
11 634
2002
2007
   
Macro-Elmar-M black (collapsible) 90mm 4.0  
2014
-
     
Summarit-M 90mm 2.5
11 646
2007
2015
   
Summarit-M Black 90mm 2.4

11 682

2015
2020
   
Summarit-M Silver 90mm 2.4

11 683

2015
2020
   
Summilux-M ASPH prototype (26 made) 90mm 1.5  
2018
2018
   
Thambar-M re-make of the legendary Thambar lens, now with M mount and 6-bit coding. 90mm 2.2  
2017
-
   
Elmar [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 4.0
11 850
1960
1965
     
Elmar [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 4.0
11 850
1960
1965
     
Elmarit (I) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 2.8
11 829
1963
1964
     
Elmarit (II) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 2.8
11 829
1964
1973
     
Tele-Elmar [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 4.0
11 851
1965
1998
     
Elmarit-M (III) 135mm 2.8
11 829
1973
1997
     
APO-Telyt-M 135mm 3.4
11 889
1998
-
   

 

Leica 6-bit coding for Leica M lenses

 

           
6*
 

 

Leica M lens 6-BIT CODING
From the introduction of the Leica M8 digital rangefinder all Leica M lenses were with a 6-BIT code so as to tell the camera which lens was mounted. This made it posible for the software to correct the image, and for the lens type to be read from the EXIF file.
Most Leica M lenses can be sent to Leica Camera AG and get the 6-BIT code added. Alternatively one can buy a lens coder kit from a third part and ink code the lens (the Leica Camera AG coding is engraved). Since the introduction of the Leica M9 digital rangefinder another possibility also exist in that one can manually select which lens is on the camra and so get the adjustment and info the 6-BIT code else would give the camera.

In this list the lenses that can be 6-bit coded is marked 6*

A 6-bit code on a Leica M lens    
2007
-
   

 

Leica M macro kits

Leica M macro adapter rings and optics

 

         

Leitz macro ring(sits between body and lens)
Silver finish made of brass. Can be stacked.
   
1969
1975
OUFRO
 
Leica Macro-Adapter-M (sits between body and lens)
Adjustable macro adapter
   
14 652
2014
-
   

Leica Macro-Adapter M (sits between body and lens)
Came with the Leica 90mm Macro-Elmar-M lens no 11 634

   
14 409
2002
2014
   

Leica Elpro 52mm Close-Up Lens (sits in front of lens)
with 49 and 46mm step-up Rings. For Leica M and Leica TL lenses

   
14 125
2019
-
     

 

Visoflex

"Visoflex" lenses were made for Leicaflex and Leicaflex SL and Leicaflex SL2 ("Visoflex" lenses with R bayonet; mainly known as Telyt-R lenses) and for Leica rangefinder cameras (Visoflex lenses with screw-threat and using a Visoflex device between the camera and the lens (see definitions in the bottom of this site)).
Can also be used for R3, R4, R6, R6.2, R7, R8, R9 (and Digilux 3 with an adapter). Some of these lenses are repeated in the R-lens section below for clarifying purposes.

 

Elmar 65mm 3.5
11 062
1960
1970
     
Elmar-V 65mm 3.5
11 162
1970
1984
     
Hektor 125mm 2.5  
1954
1963
HIKOO
   
Telyt 200mm 4.5  
1935
1960
OTPLO
   
Telyt 200mm 4.0  
1959
1984
TELOO
   
Telyt-V 280mm 4.8
11 914
1961
1984
     
Telyt (I) 400mm 5.0  
1936
1955
TLCOO
   
Telyt (II) 400mm 5.0  
1956
1966
TLCOO
   
Telyt 500mm 5.6
11 866
1966
1971
     
Telyt-R (1971-1995) Telyt (1971-1984) 400mm 6.8
11 966
1971
1984/95
     
Telyt-R (with shoulder stock) (no cam) w/Televit focus device 560mm 5.6
11 867
1966
1973
 
3,455 g
 
Telyt-R (1971-1995 with shoulder stock) Telyt (1971-1984) 560mm 6.8
11 864
1971
1984/95
 
2,330 g
 

 

Leica R lenses

R-lenses for R3, R4, R6, R6.2, R7, R8, R9 (can also be used on Digilux 3 with an adapter).
Can be used on Leicaflex, SL and SL2 unless the lens has a ROM contact.
Most are compatible with Leica M Type 240 using a R-to-M adaptor and EVF digital viewfinder for focusing

Super-Elmar-R (Zeiss) 15mm 3.5
11 213
1980
2001
 
815 g
 
Super-Elmarit-R ASPH (Schneider) 15mm 2.8
11 326
2001
2009
 
750 g
Elmarit-R "fish-eye" (Minolta) 16mm 2.8
11 222
1975
2001
 
460 g
 
Elmarit-R (I) (E82 filters) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 19mm 2.8
11 225
1975
1990
 
500 g
 
Elmarit-R (II) (built-in filters) [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 19mm 2.8
11 258
1990
2009
 
500 g
Super-Angulon-R (Schneider) (can only be used with mirror up) 21mm 3.4
11 803
1964
1968
 
228 g
 
Super-Angulon-R (Schneider) 21mm 4.0
11 813
1968
1994
 
410 g
 
Elmarit-R (Minolta) 24mm 2.8
11 221
1974
2006
 
400 g
 
Summilux-R (only a few prototypes exist, never produced) 28mm 1.4            
Elmarit-R (I) 2-cam or 3-cam (lens hood #12509) 28mm 2.8
11 204
1970
1994
 
275 g
 
Elmarit-R (I) olive-green "safari" (for R3 Safari) 28mm 2.8
11 204
1970
1994
 
275 g
 
Elmarit-R (II) (built-in lens hood) 28mm 2.8
11 333
1994
2009
 
435 g
PC Super-Angulon-R (Schneider) 28mm 2.8
11 812
1988
2009
   
Elmarit-R (I) black (lens hood #12564) 35mm 2.8
11 201
1964
1973
 
400 g
 
Elmarit-R (I) silver chrome (lens hood #12564) (ca. 200 made) 35mm 2.8
11 201
1964
1965
     
PA Curtagon-R (Schneider) (lens hood #12509) 35mm 4.0
11 202
1970
1996
 
510 g
 
Summicron-R (I) (lens hood #12509) 35mm 2.0
11 227
1972
1976
 
510 g
 
Elmarit-R (II) (lens hood #12509) 35mm 2.8
11 231
1973
1979
 
410 g
 
Elmarit-R (III) (built-in lens hood) 35mm 2.8
11 231
1973
1979
 
305 g
 
Summicron-R (II) (built-inlens hood) serial 2791417 and above
[Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
35mm 2.0
11 115
1977
2009
 
430 g
Summilux-R (built-inlens hood) 35mm 1.4
11 143
1984
2009
 
690 g
Noctilux-R (few prototypes exist, never produced) 52mm 1.2          
Summicron-R (I) (chrome; only 200 produced)
[Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
50mm 2.0
11 228
1964
1966
     
Summicron-R (I) (lens hood #12564)
[Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
50mm 2.0
11 228
1964
1976
 
390 g
 
Summilux-R (I)  (lens hood #12508) to serial 2806500 50mm 1.4
11 875
1970
?
 
450 g
 
Summilux-R (II) (olive-green "safari" for the R3 Safari)  50mm 1.4  
1970
1980
 
400 g
 
Summilux-R (II) (gold for the R3 gold) (ca. 1,000 made)  50mm 1.4  
1979
1979
     
Summilux-R (II) (built-in lens hood) 3-cam 50mm 1.4
11 875
1970
1998
 
400 g
 
Summicron-R (II) (olive-green "safari" for the R3 Safari) 50mm 2.0
11 215
1976
1980
 
290 g
 
Summicron-R (II) (built-in lens hood)
[Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler]
50mm 2.0
11 215
1976
2009
 
290 g
Summilux-R (III) (built-in lens hood) 50mm 1.4
11 344
1998
2009
 
490 g
Macro-Elmarit-R (I) 2-cam or 3-cam 60mm 2.8
11 205
1972
?
 
390 g
 
Macro-Elmarit-R (II) s/n 3013651 or greater 60mm 2.8
11 205
1972
2009
 
400 g
Elcan-R APO (special series for US Military; only 25 produced)
[by Dr. Walter Mandler]
75mm 2.0
C-341
1965
1965
   
Summilux-R [Lens design by Dr. Walter Mandler] 80mm 1.4
11 880
1980
2009
 
700 g
Elmarit-R (I) (built-in lens hood) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.8
11 229
1964
1983
 
500 g
 
Summicron-R (I) (built-in lens hood, 2-pieces) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.0
11 219
1970
1977
 
560 g
 
Summicron-R (II) (serial 3381677 or greater) (1-piece lens hood)
[by Dr. Walter Mandler]
90mm 2.0
11 219
1977
2000
 
520 g
 
Elmarit-R (II) (built-in lens hood) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 90mm 2.8
11 806
1983
1998
 
450 g
 
Apo-Summicron-R ASPH  (III) 90mm 2.0
11 350
2002
2009
 
520 g
Macro-Elmar-R (1:1 reproduction with bellows) (no cams) 100mm 4.0
11 232
1978
1995
 
360 g
Macro-Elmar-R (1:3 reproduction) (3-cam) 100mm 4.0
11 232
1978
1995
 
530 g
Apo-Macro-Elmarit-R 100mm 2.8
11 210
1987
2009
 
760 g
Elmarit-R (I) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 2.8
11 111
1964
1968
 
660 g
 
Elmarit-R (II) (s/n 3381676 and above) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 135mm 2.8
11 211
1968
1998
 
730 g
 

Elcan-R APO (ca. 25 produced for US Military)
[by Dr. Walter Mandler]

180mm 3.4
C-303
1965
1965
   
Elmarit-R (I) (1, 2 or 3 cam) 180mm 2.8
11 919
1968
1979
 
1,325 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 180mm 3.4
11 240
1975
1998
 
750 g
 
Elmar-R 180mm 4.0
11 922
1976
1996
 
540 g
 
Elmar-R olive-green "safari"  (for R3 Safari) 180mm 4.0
11 922
1976
1996
 
540 g
 
Elmarit-R (II) (3 cam) 180mm 2.8
11 923
1980
1998
 
810 g
 
Apo-Summicron-R 180mm 2.0
11 354
1994
2006
     
Apo-Elmarit-R (I) 180mm 2.8
11 273
1998
2004
 
970 g
 
Apo-Elmarit-R (II) 180mm 2.8
11 357
2004
2009
 
970 g
Telyt-R (I)  (2 or 3 cam) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 250mm 4.0
11 920
1970
1979
 
1,380 g
 
Telyt-R (II) (3 cam) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 250mm 4.0
11 925
1980
1994
 
1,230 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R (I) (E112 filters) 280mm 2.8
11 245
1984
1992
 
2,750 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R (II) (serial 3492511 or greater) (Series 5.5 filters) 280mm 2.8
11 245
1992
1996
 
2,800 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R 280mm 4.0
11 360
1993
2009
 
1,875 g
Apo-Telyt-R Module 280mm 2.8
11 846
1996
2009
 
3,740 g
Telyt-R (3 cam) [by Dr. Walter Mandler] 350mm 4.8
11 915
1980
1993
 
1,820 g
 
Telyt-R (with shoulder stock) (no cam) with Televit grip 400mm 5.6  
1966
1968
 
2,350 g
 
Telyt-R (with shoulder stock) (no cam) 400mm 6.8  
1968
1994
     
Apo-Telyt-R (catalog number 11 260 or 11 256) 400mm 2.8
11 256
1992
1996
 
5,800 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R Module 400mm 2.8
11 847
1996
2009
 
6,240 g
Apo-Telyt-R Module 400mm 4.0
11 857
1996
2009
 
3,860 g
Elcan-R APO (special series for US Military) 450mm 5.6
C-329
1965
1965
   
MR-Telyt-R compact mirror tele lens (Minolta) (3 cam) 500mm 8.0
11 243
1980
1996
 
750 g
 
Telyt-R (with shoulder stock) (no cam) w/Televit focus device 560mm 5.6
11 867
1966
1973
 
3,455 g
 
Telyt-R (with shoulder stock) (no cam) 560mm 6.8
11 864
1971
1995
 
2,330 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R Module 560mm 4.0
11 848
1996
2009
 
6,360 g
Apo-Telyt-R Module 560mm 5.6
11 858
1996
2009
 
4,060 g
Telyt mirror tele prototype 600mm 5.0          
Telyt-S 800mm 6.3
11 921
1972
1997
 
6,850 g
 
Apo-Telyt-R Module 800mm 5.6
11 849
1996
2009
 
6,550 g
Apo-Telyt-R (two prototypes and one final lens was made for Sheikh Saud Al Thani of Qatar. A prototype is on display in the Leica Factory in Wetzlar) 1600mm 5.6  
2006
2006
   
Leica ROM contacts
For Leica R lenses not already fitted with the digital ROM contacts, these can be added at Leica. The ROM contact contains detailed information about the lens for the lightmeter to use so that metering and exposure can be adjusted down to 1/10 f-stop.
The ROM contact also tell the DMR digital back which lens is mounted so that it can be read in the EXIF files.
     
1996
2007
     

 

Leica Vario-R zoom lenses

Vario R zoom lenses for R-lenses for R3, R4, R6, R6.2, R7, R8, R9 (can also be used on Digilux 3 with an adapter).
Can be used on Leicaflex, SL and SL2 unless the lens has a ROM contact .
Most are compatible with Leica M Type 240 using a R-to-M adaptor and EVF digital viewfinder for focusing

Vario-Elmar-R ASPH 21-35mm 3.5 - 4.0
11 274
2002
2009
 
500 g
Vario-Elmar-R (I) (Sigma) 28-70mm 3.5 - 4.5
11 364
1990
1997
     
Vario-Elmar-R (II) (Sigma) 28-70mm 3.5 - 4.5
11 364
1998
2006
     
Vario-Elmarit-R ASPH 28-90mm 2.8 - 4.5
11 365
2004
2009
   
Vario-Elmar-R (I) (Minolta) (Filter E60) 35-70mm 3.5
11 244
1983
?
     
Vario-Elmar-R (II) (serial 3393301 or greater) (Filter E67) 35-70mm 3.5
11 244
1983
1996
 
450 g
 
Vario-Elmar-R (Kyocera) 35-70mm 4.0
11 277
1997
2009
 
400 g
Vario-Elmarit-R ASPH (only were 200 made) 35-70mm 2.8
11 275
1998
2002
 
1,000 g
Angénieux-Zoom-R 45-90mm 2.8
11 930
1969
1982
     
Vario-Elmar-R (Minolta) 70-210mm 4.0
11 246
1984
1995
 
720 g
 
Vario-Apo-Elmarit-R 70-180mm 2.8
11 279
1995
2009
 
1,870 g
Vario-Elmar-R (Minolta) 75-200mm 4.5
11 226
1978
1984
 
725 g
 
Vario-Elmar-R (Minolta) 80-200mm 4.5
11 224
1974
1978
 
780 g
 
Vario-Elmar-R (Kyocera) 80-200mm 4.0
11 281
1996
2009
 
1,020 g
Vario-Elmar-R 105-280mm 4.2
11 268
1996
2006
     

 

Leica R adapters

Leica R adapters to other systems as RED, Nikon, Blackmagic, Canon, 4:3, etc

 

         

Leica R-Adapter M  
14 642
2014
-
   
3rd part R to M adapters are available as well      
2014
       
Leica R to RED adapter      
2011
     
Leica R to Blackmagic or Blackmagic Pocket      
2014
     
Leica R to Nikon adapter (rebuild of Leica lenses by Leitax)      
2007
     
Leica R to Canon adapter      
2003
     

 

Leica R Extenders

Ways to make tele lenses more tele

 

           

Extender-R X2 (exist as 1-cam or, 3-cam)
(for use with Leica R lenses of 50mm focal length and longer and for lens speeds from f2.0. Vignetting is to be expected with 400m and longer lenses. The 50mm f1.4 and 80mm f1.4 can also be used. Thus says the manual; however, in practical use this older 2X extender reduces quality of the picture, mainly light surfaces will 'glow' (or simply: This 2X extender will blur your shots to some degree. The newer APO-extenders below here does not).

minus 2
f-stops
11 236
1980
1994
   
Apo-Extender-R X1.4 (exists with or withour ROM contacts)
(for use with 180mm f2.0 APO, 180mm f2.8 APO, 280mm f2.8 APO, 280mm f4.0 APO, 400mm f2.8 APO, 400mm f4.0 APO, 560mm f4.0 APO, 560mm f5.6 APO, 800mm f5.6 APO 28-90mm f2.8-4.5 and 105-280mm f/4.2).
minus 1
f-stop
11 249
1986
2007
   

Apo-Extender-R X2 (exists with or withour ROM contacts)
(for use with 50mm f1.4. 50mm f2.0, 60mm f2.8, 80mm f/1.4, 90mm f2.0 APO ASPH, 100mm f2.8 APO, 180mm f2.0 APO, 180mm f2.8 APO, 280mm f2.8 APO, 280mm f4.0 APO, 400mm f2.8 APO, 400mm f4.0 APO, 560mm f4.0 APO, 560mm f5.6 APO, 800mm f5.6 APO and 28-90mm f2.8-4.5, 35-70mm f4.0, 70-180mm f2.8 APO, 80-200mm f4.0 and 105-280mm f2.4).

 

minus 2
f-stops
11 262
1992
2007
   

 

Leica L-mount (SL) autofocus lenses and
Leica TL '1.5x crop' autofocus lenses

The Leica L-Mount lenses are full-frame lenses for Leica SL, Leica SL2, Leica SL2-S, Panasonic S and Sigma fp cameras.

The Leica TL lenses are APS-C "1.5x crop" lenses that fits the above mentioned cameras, as well as Leica T/TL/TL2 and Leica CL, but will only show the APS-C area.

 

TL lenses (ascts as APS-C cropped lenses on SL):        
 
 
Summicron-TL 23mm f/2 ASPH 18mm 2.0
11 081
-
 
154g
E52 filter
Summilux-TL black 35mm 1.4
11 084
2015
-
 
128g
E60 filter
Summilux-TL silver 35mm 1.4
11 085
2015
-
 
128g
E60 filter
Macro-Elmarit-TL ASPH black 60mm 2.8
11 086
-
 
320g
E60 filter
Macro-Elmarit-TL ASPH silver 60mm 2.8
11 087
-
 
320g
E60 filter
SL lenses:        
 
 
APO-Summicron-SL 28mm f/2 ASPH 28mm 2.0
11 183
-
 
700g
E67 filter
APO-Summicron-SL 35mm f/2 ASPH 35mm 2.0
11 184
-
 
750g
E67 filter
Summilux-SL 50mm f/1.4 ASPH 50mm 1.4
11 180
-
 
1065g
E82 filter
APO-Summicron-SL 50mm f/2 ASPH 50mm 2.0
11 185
-
 
740g
E67 filter
APO-Summicron-SL 75mm f/2 ASPH 75mm 2.0
11 178
-
 
720g
E67 filter
APO-Summicron-SL 90mm f/2 ASPH 90mm 2.0
11 179
-
 
700g
E67 filter
Zoom lenses TL:    
-
 
 
Super-Vario-Elmar-TL 11-23mm f/3.5-4.5 ASPH 11-12 mm zoom 3.5-4.5
11 082
-
 
368g
E67 filter
Vario-Elmar-TL 18-56mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH 18-56 mm zoom 3.5-5.6
11 080
-
 
256g
E52 filter
APO-Vario-Elmar-TL 55-135mm f/3.5-4.5 ASPH. 55-135 mm zoom 3.5-4.5
11 083
-
 
500g
E60 filter
Zoom lenses SL:    
-
 
 
Super-Vario-Elmar-SL 16–35 f/3.5–4.5 ASPH 16-35mm zoom 3.5-4.5
11 177
2019
-
 
990g
E82 filter
Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-70mm f/2.8 ASPH 24-70mm zoom 2.8
11 189
2021
-
 
856g
E82 filter
Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-90mm f/2.8-4.0 ASPH 24-90mm zoom 2.8-4.0
11 176
-
 
1140g
E82 filter
APO-Vario-Elmarit-SL 90–280 f/2.8–4 ASPH 90-280mm zoom 2.8-4.0
11 175
2018
-
 
1,710g
E82 filter

 

Leica S autofocus lenses

S-lenses for Leica S2 and Leica S.

To be updated...

(CS= Central Shutter)

 

  S-system mm Aperture
Filter
Year
Model
Equiv in FF
 
Super-Elmar-S ASPH autofocus 24mm 3.5
95mm
2011
11054
18mm
f/2.8
Elmar-S TILT-SHIFT S autofocus 30mm 2.8
82mm
2011

 

24mm
f/2.2
Elmarit-S ASPH S autofocus 30mm 2.8
82mm
2011
11073
24mm
f/2.2
Elmarit-S ASPH CS autofocus 30mm 2.8
82mm
2011
11074
24mm
f/2.2
Vario-Elmar-S ASPH autofocus zoom 30-90mm 3.5 - 5.6
95mm
2011
11058
24-70
f/2.8-4.5
Summarit-S ASPH S autofocus 35mm 2.5
82mm
2011
 11064
28mm
f/2.0
Summarit-S ASPH CS autofocus 35mm 2.5
82mm
2011
11050
28mm
f/2.0
Elmarit-S ASPH S autofocus 45mm 2.8
82mm
2013
11077
35mm
f/2.2
Elmarit-S ASPH CS autofocus 45mm 2.8
82mm
2013
11078
35mm
f/2.2
Summarit-S ASPH S autofocus 70mm 2.5
82mm
2009
11055
56mm
f/2.0
Summarit-S ASPH CS autofocus 70mm 2.5
82mm
2009
11051
56mm
f/2.0
Elmar-S ASPH autofocus 100mm 2.8
82mm
2011
80mm
f/1.5
Summicron-S ASPH autofocus 100mm 2.0  
2014
11056
 
APO-Macro-Summarit-S S autofocus 120mm 2.5
72mm
2011
11070
96mm
f/2.0
APO-Macro-Summarit-S CS autofocus 120mm 2.5
72mm
2011
11052
96mm
f/2.0
TS-APO-Elmar-S   manual focus (Tilt Shift lens) 120mm 5.6
95mm
2013
11079
96mm
 
APO-Elmar-S S autofocus 180mm 3.5
72mm
2010
11071
144mm
f/2.8
APO-Elmar-S CS autofocus 180mm 3.5
72mm
2010
11053
 
ELPRO-S 180mm Close Focus Adapter
Shortens the working range of the 180mm to 1.1 – 2.7m
180mm adapter  
 
 16032
 
APO-Tele-Elmar-S autofocus 350mm 3.5  
?
   
Leica S camera to Leica R lens adapter            
Leica S camera to Leica SL lens adapter            
Leica S camera to Hasselblad HC and HCD lens adapter            
Leica S camera to V Hasselblad CF and FE lens adapter        
16024
 
Leica S camera for C to Contax 645 lens adapter            
Leica S camera for M645 for Mamiya 645 lens adapter        
16025
 

 

Leica 4:3 lenses

Leica 4:3 "Four Third" bayonet lenses for Leica Digilux 3, Panasonic Lumix DMC-L1, Olympus E-1, E-300, E-500, E-330, E-400, E-410, E-510, P-1

 

Leica D Vario-Elmarit ASPH 1450mm 28 - 100mm 2.8 - 3.5  
2006
       
Leica D Vario-Elmarit ASPH 14150mm 28 - 300mm 3.5 - 4.5  
2007
       
Leica D Summilux ASPH 25mm 50mm 1.4  
2007
   
525 g
 

 

Leica lenses on Panasonic

Leica lenses on other brands

 

           
Panasonic video camera recorders use Leica branded lenses.            
Panasonic projectors uses Leica lenses            
Panasonic digital cameras use Leica lenses,which means Leica specified them, delivered the grinding machines to be used, and Panasonic does the production and quality control. In cases where Leica make a similar model of the lens (as in Leica D-Lux), those same lenses on the Leica bodies are made by Leica with Leica quality control.            
           
Leica projector lenses            
To be updated at a later point            
Leica enlarger lenses            
To be updated at a later point            
           
Leica Loupes
To be updated at a later point            

 

Leica Cine lenses

Leica C lenses for cine cameras. Produced by CW-Sonderoptic (Cine Wetzlar) in Wetzlar

 

Leica Summicron C cine lenses 24mm 3.5  
2011
 
Leica Summilux C cine lenses 30mm 2.8  
2011
 
Adapter C to M (third party) 30-90mm 3.5 - 5.6  
2011
 
Read article for more lens versions. Also some of the M-lenses has been made available for Cine use.            
 

 

 

             

 

More Leica lens litterature

 

       

If you are looking for the Leica Lens Compendium (2001) or the Leica Compendium (2012 print edition and 2014 digital edition) by Erwin Puts, please wisit his website for more info, or try search eBay for his books (usually sold out from the publisher rather fast, so they become collectors items).

      You may download a free PDF version of the 2002-version of the
Erwin Puts: "Leica M Lenses Their Soul and Secrets"
from overgaard.dk
             
Erwin Puts: Leica Compendium 2014   Erwin Puts: Leica Compendium 2014   Erwin Puts: 
Leica Lens Compendium
2001   "Leica M Lenses 
Their Soul and Secrets" 
2002

Erwin Puts:
"Leica Compendium"

Limited Print Version
2012
The Company - The Cameras - The Lenses

Available from Erwin Puts website, eBay or Amazon.com

 

Erwin Puts:
"Leica Compendium"
Digital Version Compact
PDF/eBook
2014
The Company - The Cameras - The Lenses

Available from Erwin Puts website
as download

 

Erwin Puts:
Leica Lens Compendium
2001
The Lenses 1925 - 2000.

Available from eBay
or Amazon.com

 

Erwin Puts:
"Leica M Lenses
Their Soul and Secrets
"

2002
You may download a free PDF version of the 2002-version of this from
from overgaard.dk

It was originally written by
Erwin Puts and made available
by Leica Camera AG

             
        Leica M-System Brochure Leica MP, Leica M7, Leica M8   "Leica M Lenses 
Their Soul and Secrets" 
2002
        Leica M System
Digital version
2007
Leica MP, Leica M7, Leica M8
Leica a la carte
Lenses & Acessories
Free download from overgaard.dk
  Leica Lens Book
Digital version
2005
Leica M system, Leica R system
Leica brochure of lenses as 2005
Free download from overgaard.dk
             
             
             

 

 

 

Leica Lens Serial Number vs. Production Year
     

This is the list of Leitz and Leica lens serial numbers and which year that lens was approximately produced.

You may also look up a specific lens serial number at the French Summilux.net

Start S/N

End S/N

Production year

156 001

195 000

1933

195 001

236 000

1934

236 001

284 600 

1935

284 601

345 000  

1936

345 001

416 500   

1937

416 501

490 000    

1938

490 001

538 500

1939

538 501

565 000

1940

565 001

582 294

1941

582 295

593 000

1942

593 001

594 880

1943

594 881

595 000

1944

595 001

601 000

1945

601 001

633 000

1946

633 001

647 000

1947

647 001

682 000

1948

682 001

756 000

1949

756 001

840 000

1950

840 001

950 000

1951

950 001

1 051 000

1952

1 051 000

1 124 000

1953

1 124 001

1 236 000

1954

1 236 001

1 333 000

1955

1 333 001

1 459 000

1956

1 459 001

1 548 000

1957

1 548 001

1 645 300

1958

1 645 301

1 717 000

1959

1 717 001

1 827 000

1960

1 827 001

1 913 000

1961

1 913 001

1 967 100

1962

1 967 101

2 015 700

1963

2 015 701

2 077 500

1964

2 077 501

2 156 300

1965

2 156 301

2 236 500

1966

2 236 501

2 254 400

1967

2 254 401

2 312 750

1968

2 312 751

2 384 700

1969

2 384 701

2 468 500

1970

2 468 501

2 503 100

1971

2 503 101

2 556 500

1972

2 556 501

2 663 400

1973

2 663 401

2 731 900

1974

2 731 901

2 761 100

1975

2 761 101

2 809 400

1976

2 809 401

2 880 600

1977

2 880 601

2 967 250

1978

2 967 251

3 013 650

1979

3 013 651

3 087 000

1980

3 087 001

3 160 500

1981

3 160 501

3 249 100

1982

3 249 101

3 294 900

1983

3 294 901

3 346 200

1984

3 346 201

3 383 200

1985

3 383 201

3 422 890

1986

3 422 891

3 455 870

1987

3 455 871

3 478 900

1988

3 478 901

3 503 150

1989

3 503 151

3 540 467

1990

3 540 468

3 583 830

1991

3 585 831

3 610 680

1992

3 610 381

3 644 475

1993

3 644 476

3 677 030

1994

3 677 031

3 730 290

1995

3 730 291 3 770 920 1996
3 770 930  3 818 624 1997
3 818 625 3 857 849 1998
3 857 850 3 882 996   1999
3 882 997  3 912 247 2000

3 912 248

3 941 497

2001

3 941 498 3 970 748 2002
3 970 748 3 999 999 2003
4 000 000 4 010 600 2004
4 010 601 4 025 900 2005
4 025 901 4 034 900 2006
4 034 901 4 057 000 2007
4 057 001 4 080 000 2008
4 080 001 4 100 000 2009
4 100 001 4 115 000 2010
4 115 001 4 130 000 2011
4 130 001   2012
circa 4 400 xxx   2013
    2014

 

             

 

             
        Definitions
        Courtesy of Oxford American and www.nemeg.com
       

 

See my more complete list of definitions at my article Leica Definitions

 

anastigmat an anastigmatic lens system (Leitz Anastigmat (Leitz I) from 1920 with a fixed 50mm f3.5 lens. Produced again as a retro camera in 2000-2002).

anastigmatic (of a lens system) constructed so that the astigmatism of each element is canceled out.
ORIGIN late 19th cent.: from an- 1 [not] + astigmatic (see astigmatism):

astigmatism a defect in the eye or in a lens caused by a deviation from spherical curvature, which results in distorted images, as light rays are prevented from meeting at a common focus.
DERIVATIVES
astigmatic
ORIGIN mid 19th cent.: from a-- [without] + Greek stigma 'point' + -ism.

Aperture
The f/ stop on the camera that regulates how much light passes through the lens. On a f/1.4 lens the lens is fully open" at f/1.4, at f/2.0 the aperture inside the lens make the hole through the lens smaller so only half the amount of light at f/1.4 passes through. For each f/-step you halve the light.
The aperture is basically the focal length divided with the f/-stop = size of the hole (90mm divided with f/2.0 = the hole is 45 mm).
ORIGIN late Middle English : from Latin apertura, from apert- ‘opened,’ from aperire ‘to open.’

APO
stands for "apochromatically corrected" lenses. In most lenses, optical design concentrates the focus of blue light and green light into a single plane, but red light falls slightly into another plane of focus. Red subjects, therefore, would be ever so slightly out of focus compared to blue and green subjects in the same frame. In APO lenses, the design and expense has been put in to making red light focus on the same plane as blue and green. Under a microscope you would see that all light subject is now in focus, creating a sharper image overall. Many manufacturers offer APO designs, but in most of these only the very center of the lens is APO corrected. Leica prides itself on making most of the frame APO corrected.

ASPH
… stands for "aspheric design". Most lenses have a spherical design - that is, the radius of curvature is constant. These are easy to manufacture by grinding while "spinning" the glass. This design however restricts the number of optical corrections that can be made to the design to render the most realistic image possible. ASPH lenses, however, involve usually 1 element that does *not* have a constant radius of curvature. These elements can be made by 1) expensive manual grinding, 2) molded plastic, 3) Leica's patented "press" process, where the element is pressed into an aspherical ("non-spherical") shape. This design allows the manufacturer to introduce corrections into compact lens designs that weren't possible before. Practically, the lens performs "better" (up to interpretation) due to increased correction of the image, in a package not significantly bigger than the spherical version.

There is another Aspherical lens manufacture technique: an uneven coating layer is applied to a spherical lens. The coating is thicker on the edges (or on the center, depending). Canon "Lens Work II" calls these "simulated" aspherical lenses. Simulated and Glass-Molded (GMo) asphericals show up in non-L Canon lenses, while the L lenses have actual ground aspheric elements.

Beam Splitter
Describes the way light travels when it enters the R series Leica SLR bodies when viewing and composing. The light beam is split into two - one part goes through the semi-silvered mirror to the light meter at the base of the mirror box, the rest is reflected upwards through the pentaprism to the viewfinder.
It is because of this "beam splitting" that you have to use Circular Polarizing filters on R cameras in order to obtain correct light meter readings. With regular linear pol. filters, phase cancellation effects occur when the light travels through the mirror, resulting in inaccurate and unpredictable readings.

Bokeh
the visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image, especially as rendered by a particular lens : It's a matter of taste and usually photographers discuss a 'nice' or 'pleasant' bokeh (the out-of-focus area is always unsharp why the quality discussed is if one likes the way it renders or not by a particular lens).
ORIGIN from Japanese 'bo-ke' which mean 'fuzziness' or 'blur.'
Here is an example of bokeh:

Bokeh with 50mm Summicron-M (II) f/2.0 @ f/2.0 on Leica M9

Compur
Curently no origin known. Leica I Compur camera (1926-1941) and Leica Summicron (II) Compur 50mm f2.0 lens(1959).

CS
Central Shutter, as in the Leica S lenses for the Leica S2 where a shutter is located in the lens itself.

DOF (Depth of Field)
How big a distance in an image that is acceptable sharp. The DOF is determined by the subject distance (the farther away, the larger area is sharp; the closer the focus is, the less of the lage is sharp), the lens aperture (the depth of field is narrow at f/1.4 and larger at f/5.6) and the focal length of the lens (tele lenses has very narrow depth of field whereas wide angle lenses has a wide depth of field) and film or sensor size (small-sensor cameras has a wide depth of field wheras medium format or large format cameras has a very narrow depth of field).
The DOF is usually indicated on the lens by the focus barrel where one can see how large the DOF will be at different f/-stops for that lens.
As an example, a Leica 21mm Super-Angulon-M f/3.4 lens is sharp all over the focus field from 2 meter to infinity when set at a distance of 3 meters at f/3.4.
Here is an example of narrow DOF where only a few milliemeters are sharp:

Leica 50mm Noctilux-M f/1.0 example of depth of field on a Leica M9 sample image
Leica 50mm Nictilux-M f/1.0 @ f/1.0 on a Leica M9.

Elcan
Ernst Leitz Canada, established 1952, was and still is the military/industrial branch of the old "Ernst Leitz Canada". In 1998, the ELCAN plant was sold to Raytheon (USA), who bought it from its previous owner, Hughes Aircraft Co.
Elcan-R is also the name of s series of lenses made in the 1960ies and early 1970ies, as the U.S. Navy High Resolution Small Format Camera System during the Viet Nam war.

Elmar
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f3.5 . Historically derived from the original 1925 50mm f3.5 Elmax lens, which was an acronym of Ernst Leica and Professor Max Berak, designer of the original lenses. Later that year the 50mm f3.5 Elmar superceded the Elmax, which was discontinued due to its complexity and high cost of manufacture.

Elmarit
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f2.8 . The name is obviously derived from the earlier (and slower) "Elmar" designation. Not every f2.8 lens is called an "Elmarit" though, the most obvious current exception being the 50mm f2.8 Elmar-M collapsible lens which for nostalgia and marketing reasons has kept the original 1930's Elmar name (the 50mm f3.5 collapsible Elmar, manufactured 1930-59, was one of Leica's most famous and popular lenses).

Elmax
Elmax = E. Leitz + Max Berak. Ernst Leitz was the founder of Ernst Leitz Optical Industry which later became Leica. Professor Dr. Max Berak was employed at Leica in 1912 and was the architect of the first Leica lens which Ernst Leitz asked him to design for the "Barnack's camera" (the 1913-prototype named after Oscar Barnack who invented it). The lens was a f/3.5 50mm and was known as the Leitz Anstigmat and later the Elmax.

f/
the ratio of the focal length (for example 50mm) of a camera lens to the diameter of the aperture being used for a particular shot. (e.g., f8, indicating that the focal length is eight times the diameter: 50mm/8 = 6,25 mm).
ORIGIN early 20th cent.: from f (denoting the focal length) and number

f-stop
One f-stop is a doubling or halving of the light going through the lens to the film, by adjusting the aperture ring. Adjusting the f-setting from f 1.4 to f.2.0 is halving the light that goes through the lens. Most Leica lenses has half f-stops to enable the photographer to adjust the light more precisely.

Focal length
The distance between the nodal point of a lens and the focal plane (the film or sensor in the camera). That is the construction definition based on simple lens systems where a 400mm lens would be 400mm long and a 50mm lens would be 50mm long. Today one call it effective focal length (EFL) as a 400mm lens is not nessesarily 400mm long due to optical constructions that can make it shorter. The 35-420mm zoom on the Leica V-Lux 1 is for example only ca. 135 mm long.
For photographers it's more interesting that focal length indicates if it is a wideangle lens (ex. 35mm), normal lens (50mm) or tele lens (ex. 400mm).
A 35mm lens is a ca. 54° viewing angle horizontal, a 400mm lens is ca. 5° viewing angle horizontal, etc. This is the practical, usable information about focal lengths a photographer can use.

Four Thirds
The Four Thirds System is a standard created by Olympus and Kodak for digital SLR camera design and development.
The system provides a standard which, with digital cameras and lenses available from multiple manufacturers, allows for the interchange of lenses and bodies from different manufacturers. Companies developing 4:3 cameras and/or lenses are Fuji, Kodak, Leica (Leica Digilux 3), Olympus, Panasonic, Sanyo, Sigma. See www.4-3system.com
A further development in this was Micro Four Thirds Systems.

FF (Full Frame)
In sensors full frame usually refers to sensors the size of a full 24x36mm frame where one capture the same frame size as with 35mm film. The "full frame" technically deifinition thouhg is a sensor that camtures the full frame in one go (as the early sensors as in Leica S1 scanned the image/senor over a period of time).

Hektor
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - usually f2.5 . The name was apparently taken from the name of lens designer Professor Max Berek's dog. See Leica History article.

Kyocera
Sub-manufacturer of lenses. Has made certain lenses for Leitz, Carl Zeiss, etc.

Leica
LEItz CAmera. Founded 1849 in Wetzlar, Germany

Lens hood
a tube or ring attached to the front of a camera lens to prevent unwanted light from reaching the film.
ORIGIN Old English hod; related to Dutch hoed, German Hut 'hat,' also to hat .

M
(as in "M3", "M6", "M7" etc.)
… stands for "Messucher", which is German for "Viewfinder". The "3" in M3 was chosen because of the three bright line finders for the 50, 90 and 135 mm lenses. Later the numbers of the M cameras were more or less chosen to follow each other.
"Meßsucher". It is always correctly written with the "ß". There are technically not three "s", rather the "ß" and one "s" because it is a word constructed by the combining of two precise words.
M-body evolution in chronological order:
M3 - MP - M2 - M1 - MD - MDA - M4 - M5 - CL - MD-2 - M4-2 - M4-P - M6 - M6 TTL - M7 - MP - M8 - M8.2 - M9 - M9-P - MM - ME (Type 220) - Leica M (Type 240) .

Mandler, Dr. Walter (1922 - 2005)
Legendary Leica lens designer. Read more in Leica History.

MP
Stands (also) for Mechanical Perfection (Leica MP).

MF (Medium Format)

No.
Number, on this site Leica catalog numbers or order numbers. Some the numbers changed depending on the number of cams in the lens: The Elmarit-R f2.8/135mm started life as No. 11 111, however when fitted with 2 cams for the SL became No. 11 211, yet another No. for the 3 cams lens and a fourth number for 3 cam only at the end of its life. Number changes also applied to M lenses depending on whether they were screw-thread, bayonet or for M3 with “spectacles”.
Thus the No. in this list is a guideline but not a comlete list of existing catalog numbers.

Noctilux
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f1.0 . "Nocti" for nocturnal (occurring or happening at night; ORIGIN late 15th cent.: from late Latin nocturnalis, from Latin nocturnus ‘of the night,’ from nox, noct- ‘night.), "lux" for light. The Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 was famous for enabling the photographer to take photos even there is onl candlelights to lit the scene and was replaced by the f/0.95 Noctilux-M ASPH 50mm in 2009.

Shoulder Stock
A Leitz mechanism attached to the (tele-) lens and held against one's shoulder when photographing, so as to stabilize the tele lens when using handheld without a tripod or monopod. The shoulder stock is attached to the lens same way as a tripod or monopod.

SLR abbreviation for Single-Lens Reflex; the lens that forms the image on the film also provides the image in the viewfinder via a mirror.

Summar - (or a story of name development)
The 1933 lens 50mm f2.0 Summar: It started out as Summar (f2.0), then the Summitar (f2.0 in 1939), then the Summarex (f1.5 in 1948), then the Summaron (35mm f.2.8 in 1948, then later f2.0, f3.5 and f5.6 lenses), then the Summarit (f1.5 in 1949 and used again for the 40mm f2.4 on the Leica Minilux in 1995, then again for the 35mm, 50mm, 75mm and 90mm Summarit f2.5 in 2007) then the Summicron (f2.0 in 1953 for the collapsible 50mm) and finally the Summilux (50mm f1.4 in 1959).
However, Leitz in Wetzlar made the Mikro-Summar 42mm f4,5 around 1910 for their Leitz microscopes (Leitz was orignally a microscope producer, see history site). Leitz also made a Mikro-Summar 35mm F:4,5.
ORIGIN of Summar is unknown.
Leitz Wetzlar Mikro-Summar 42mm f4.5
Leitz Wetzlar Mikro-Summar 42mm f4.5 lens anno 1910 might be the first lens carrying the name Summar.

Summarit
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f1.5 .

Summicron
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f2.0 . There are many guesses how this name came about, a popular one being that the "summi" came from "summit" (summit means the highest point of a hill or mountain; the highest attainable level of achievement) while the "cron" came from "chroma" (ie. for colour). Not so: The name (Summi)cron was used because the lens used Crown glass for the first time, which Leitz bought from Chance Brothers in England. The first batch of lenses were named Summikron (Crown = Krone in Deutsch). The Summi(cron) is a development from the original Summar (the 50mm f2.0 lens annoy 1933)

Summilux
Refers to the maximum lens aperture - here f1.4 , "-lux" added for "light" (ie. the enhanced light gathering abilities).

Telyt
Lens nomenclature - short-hand for " telephoto " (tele- is a combining form, meaning to or at a distance and used in names of instruments for operating over long distances : telemeter.
ORIGIN: from Greek tele- ‘far off.’

Televit
rapid-focus device from Leitz that was made from 1966 through 1973, in both R and Visoflex. It was originally designed for use with the 400mm f5.6 Telyt and 560mm f5.6 Telyt. Beginning in 1970 (with serial 2340953) the Televit could also be used with the 280mm f4.8 Telyt-V by using adapter 14138.

Thambar
Origin of name currently unknown. Leitz Thambar 90mm f.2.2. At most about 3000 were made, probably in eight batches, starting with 226xxx (actually built in 1934) and going through 283xxx, 311xxx, 375xxx, 416xxx, 472xxx, 511xxx, and 540xxx (about 1939/1940).
Today they are staggeringly rare and extremely expensive: you would be lucky to get away with much less than $1500 for the lens without accessories (center spot, shade, cap), and you could easily pay twice that for a good, complete example with clean glass.
Known to be a legendary soft-focus portrait lens that 'make a woman look 10 years younger.' A glass filter with a black spot in the middle, about 13mm (1/2”) in diameter cuts out the central (sharpest) part of the image and makes everything even softer.
(Source: Roger W. Hicks)
Here are some advice from a Thambar user, Theodor Heinrichsohn, who have used it mainly for portraits using an Leica M5 and Leica M6:
1. The results are more or less unpredictable. Best practice is to shoot many times and pick the one you like best.
2. Shots against the light are generally more effective than with the light behind you.
3. The most pleasing results to my taste were with center filter at medium apertures. With luck portraits took on the "dreamy" look that the lens is famous for.
4. I never used the Thambar for anything except portraits.
The lens has been rumored to be slightly radioactive due to the process of producing the glass.
Here are some sample photos of Koichiro Itamura Photography.
Here are some more sample images from Blue Penguin.
Here is my article and test photos of the Thambar

Viewfinder a device on a camera showing the field of view of the lens.
1) A built-in viewfinder in a camera that simply show the frame you get when you look through the viewfinder.
2) A rangefinder viewfinder which is also used to focus the lens. In Leica M cameras two pictures has to meet and lay 'on top of each other' for the picture to be in focus.
3) An external viewfinder, usually on top of the camera in the flash shoe, so as to show the field of view of lenses vider than what the built-in viewfinder can show (15mm, 21mm, 24mm, 28mm etc viewfinders exist)
4) Very simple "aiming-devices" on top of a camera that is simply a metal frame without any optics. Just a frame, as for example very old cameras (the original Leica), or when using cameras in diving where you can't look through the camera.

Visoflex
A device mounted between the Leica M camera and a lens, containing a mirror mechanism like in a SLR camera, thus allowing the M user to 'preview' a picture using a tele lens larger than 135mm which is the maximum covered by the frame lines in the Leica viewfinder.

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
        Comments?
If you have further information, please send an e-mail to thorsten@overgaard.dk and I'll try to incorporate it.
           
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